ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down

Author Topic: Help needed to set up a Behringer FBQ1000 feedback destroyer to my DJ controller  (Read 14577 times)

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

Greetings,

I will be receiving the Behringer FBQ1000 feedback destroyer in about a week so I went on YouTube to find a setup tutorial for this unit because I'm not an audio engineer. I couldn't find any so I'm reaching out to find out if anyone knows of a tutorial video or or something that can guide me step by step with easy language.

My sound system consists of the following:

Turbosound ip2000 speakers
Poineer DDJ-SR2 controller
Mackie Mix12FX mixer
Sennheiser dynamic mic

I'm not sure exactly where to place the feedback destroyer between the part of my sound system. Should it be connected between the mixer and the DJ controller or between the DJ controller and the speakers?

I also tried to read the user manual and it was above my head and didn't help in any way.

Please go easy on me.

Truly,
Emad-ud-deen
« Last Edit: October 31, 2018, 10:44:12 am by Emad-ud-deen Leiman »
Logged

Lance Hallmark

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 261
  • Tampa Bay, FL
    • Hallmark Events & Entertainment

Greetings,

I will be receiving the Behringer FBQ1000 feedback destroyer in about a week so I went on YouTube to find a setup tutorial for this unit because I'm not an audio engineer. I couldn't find any so I'm reaching out to find out if anyone knows of a tutorial video or or something that can guide me step by step with easy language.

My sound system consists of the following:

Turbosound ip2000 speakers
Poineer DDJ-SR2 controller
Mackie Mix12FX mixer
Sennheiser dynamic mic

I'm not sure exactly where to place the feedback destroyer between the part of my sound system. Should it be connected between the mixer and the DJ controller or between the DJ controller and the speakers?

I also tried to read the user manual and it was above my head and didn't help in any way.

Please go easy on me.

Truly,
Emad-ud-deen

I really don't see the need for having this piece of equipment, return it and save your money for subs. Connect your DDJ-SR2 to a stereo input on the Mackie. Connect the speakers to the Mackie main outputs. If you have enough headroom, you can connect the mic to the DDJ-SR and you might not even need the Mackie, just connect the speakers to the main outs on the DDJ-SR2.
Logged
----------------------------------------------------
Lance Hallmark
Hallmark Events & Entertainment
Chamsys, Crown, Danley, EV, JTR, Powersoft, Yamaha

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

I really don't see the need for having this piece of equipment, return it and save your money for subs. Connect your DDJ-SR2 to a stereo input on the Mackie. Connect the speakers to the Mackie main outputs. If you have enough headroom, you can connect the mic to the DDJ-SR and you might not even need the Mackie, just connect the speakers to the main outs on the DDJ-SR2.

Hi Lance,

Before purchasing the feedback destroyer, I tried setting up the mixer and controller as you have described. I can get by without feedback only at low volume levels but I need to get the mic louder. I was thinking the feedback destroyer would allow me to increase the mic volume without any feedback if the feedback destroyer was set in auto mode which I need to find out how to do.

Truly,
Emad-ud-deen
Logged

Jeff Lelko

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1143
  • Cape Canaveral, FL

I was thinking the feedback destroyer would allow me to increase the mic volume without any feedback if the feedback destroyer was set in auto mode which I need to find out how to do.

Hi there, this can be accomplished in a number of different ways - all superior to and without the use of a feedback destroyer.  Speaker placement and microphone selection come into play here, and I'd take a basic GEQ and/or PEQ any day over a feedback destroyer to reduce ringing, humming, and feedback.  I'd vote to return the Behringer unit, buy a basic 31-band GEQ, and learn how to ring out a system (along with how to place speakers and choose microphones).  All a feedback suppressor does is pull back certain frequencies or boost others, which in moderation might help but usually just ends up ruining your sound.  I prefer the manual approach in which I know exactly what's going in or coming out.  Hope this helps!   
Logged

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

Hi there, this can be accomplished in a number of different ways - all superior to and without the use of a feedback destroyer.  Speaker placement and microphone selection come into play here, and I'd take a basic GEQ and/or PEQ any day over a feedback destroyer to reduce ringing, humming, and feedback.  I'd vote to return the Behringer unit, buy a basic 31-band GEQ, and learn how to ring out a system (along with how to place speakers and choose microphones).  All a feedback suppressor does is pull back certain frequencies or boost others, which in moderation might help but usually just ends up ruining your sound.  I prefer the manual approach in which I know exactly what's going in or coming out.  Hope this helps!   

Hi Jeff,

Thanks for the reply. I always have been placing my speakers out around 15 feet in front of me and to the right and left sides. The mic is placed about 10 feet away from the speakers and I'm seated around 4 feet behind the mic which is pointed out away from me.

I would like to first try the feedback destroyer and find out how to set it up. If I have problems with the sound I will start looking for the 31-band GEQ. If I go with the GEQ, can you direct me to a video tutorial on how to ring out my system?

Truly,
Emad-ud-deen
Logged

Geert Friedhof

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 472

Why are you 4 feet behind the mic, which is pointing away from you?
Logged

Mac Kerr

  • Old enough to know better
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6398
  • Audio Plumber

I always have been placing my speakers out around 15 feet in front of me and to the right and left sides. The mic is placed about 10 feet away from the speakers and I'm seated around 4 feet behind the mic which is pointed out away from me.
Why are you 4 feet behind the mic, which is pointing away from you?

I would expect, in a DJ environment, that the vocal mic would be within an inch of your lips, and as far upstage of the speakers as possible.

Mac
Logged

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

Why are you 4 feet behind the mic, which is pointing away from you?

Hi Geert,

It's pointing away from me and I have it 4 feet in front of me so the party host can make announcements. I thought 4 feet should be enough for the host to get behind it.

For the speakers, if you draw an imaginary horizontal line between them, they are at least 15 feet in front of the mic. Horizontally they are also at least 20 feet apart.

Truly,
Emad
Logged

lindsay Dean

  • Classic LAB
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 615

??. You need a mic for yourself close Within  2 inches, pointed towards your mouth .
     a separate mic for announcers that you can turn up and down you're creating the issue by your setup.
Logged
"A mans got to know his limitations"
     and Pray for higher guidance

Jeff Lelko

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1143
  • Cape Canaveral, FL

I'm seated around 4 feet behind the mic which is pointed out away from me.

That's your problem.  As others have already said, the mic should be no more than an inch or two away from your mouth.  You're also using the mic backwards - it needs to point towards you, or should I say towards the source of the audio.  Most microphones will, by design, reject audio that comes from unexpected directions such as to the sides or behind.

No amount of equipment will fix the problem you're having when the microphone is set up such as how you describe it, especially when playing at DJ volumes.   
Logged

David Allred

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1673

Hi Geert,

It's pointing away from me and I have it 4 feet in front of me so the party host can make announcements.

Truly,
Emad

The party host should face the audience, so the mic should face away from the audience and face toward you.
Logged

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

The party host should face the audience, so the mic should face away from the audience and face toward you.

Hi Everyone,

Sorry for the confusion.  ::)

I'm actually facing the audience and so is the party host and the mic is facing the host who does the announcements. I also make sure the host gets an inch or 2 from the mic and keeps it on the mic stand.

Truly,
Emad
Logged

Luke Geis

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1714
    • Owner of Endever Music Production's

I think the biggest problem is that you are asking for the mic to get much louder than the PA is capable of allowing. Feedback is a curable disease, but it also a necessary evil too. With your level of skill and likely grade of equipment, you could probably eek out 3-6 more db of SPL before feedback, but I am not sure that will be enough for you? DJ's tend to run systems pretty hard and making vocals have the same SPL and impact as the music is very difficult. At some point, you have to work with what you have and come to terms that it can't do everything you want.

This may mean being diligent at keeping a certain SPL so that the vocal mic can have a chance at having the impact or volume difference you wish. If you simply need that much level to the back of the room, you will have to get more speakers and spread them about. What you want and the reality of what you can have will have to come to a point of equilibrium. A graphic EQ will get you 7/10ths of the way to where you want, the last three 10ths are a matter of skill and equipment quality.
Logged
I don't understand how you can't hear your self

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

I think the biggest problem is that you are asking for the mic to get much louder than the PA is capable of allowing. Feedback is a curable disease, but it also a necessary evil too. With your level of skill and likely grade of equipment, you could probably eek out 3-6 more db of SPL before feedback, but I am not sure that will be enough for you? DJ's tend to run systems pretty hard and making vocals have the same SPL and impact as the music is very difficult. At some point, you have to work with what you have and come to terms that it can't do everything you want.

This may mean being diligent at keeping a certain SPL so that the vocal mic can have a chance at having the impact or volume difference you wish. If you simply need that much level to the back of the room, you will have to get more speakers and spread them about. What you want and the reality of what you can have will have to come to a point of equilibrium. A graphic EQ will get you 7/10ths of the way to where you want, the last three 10ths are a matter of skill and equipment quality.

Hi Luke,

Yes, I'm trying to get more loudness from the mic without it causing feedback. I will using the mic mostly for the host to make announcements. I normally turn the music all the way down for the announcements.

Soon my feedback destroyer will be arriving and I would like to know how to set it up. If I can't get it working, I plan to purchase a 31 band GEQ and try to learn how to separate offending frequencies. Any help figuring out how to set up the feedback destroyer or GEQ will be appreciated.

Truly,
Emad
Logged

Scott Holtzman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5225
  • Ghost AV - Avon Lake, OH
    • Ghost Audio Visual Systems, LLC

Hi Luke,

Yes, I'm trying to get more loudness from the mic without it causing feedback. I will using the mic mostly for the host to make announcements. I normally turn the music all the way down for the announcements.

Soon my feedback destroyer will be arriving and I would like to know how to set it up. If I can't get it working, I plan to purchase a 31 band GEQ and try to learn how to separate offending frequencies. Any help figuring out how to set up the feedback destroyer or GEQ will be appreciated.

Truly,
Emad

You were given sound advice from experts in the field.  You were also told where you can connect it in the signal chain.  The concepts of equalization, speaker location and gain staging are foreign to you and you appear to be hoping for an automated solution. 

I think you are going to be disappointed in the results.  Just stick it between the board and amplifier and watch it hack away.
Logged
Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman
River Delta Audio is now:

Ghost Audio Visual Solutions, LLC
Cleveland OH
www.ghostav.rocks

David Allred

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1673

123db max spl and 120 deg coverage is contributing to the problem.
Logged

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

Hi Everyone,

Sorry for not writing back sooner. I've been quite busy.

I returned the Behringer because the unit was as bad as the user manual. It made no sense. I did some more research and found the manual for a dbx unit. The manual was written in plain English, made sense and had a lot of diagrams that shows where to place the unit. I also got an Android app that lets me know the sound frequency for each feedback sound so I can set fixed filters for those particular frequencies. It's almost like a GEQ except it's menu controlled and has no faders. After I finished setting up the fixed filters it went into an automatic mode that monitors for additional feedback and cuts them out if the party host takes the mic and walks around with it.

Thanks everyone for telling me about ringing out a system. Now I don't have to worry about feedback any more.

Truly,
Emad
Logged

David Allred

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1673

A dbx unit?
Logged

Emad-ud-deen Leiman

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8

A dbx unit?

Hi David,

Yes. It's the dbx AFS2.

Truly,
Emad
Logged

Scott Holtzman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5225
  • Ghost AV - Avon Lake, OH
    • Ghost Audio Visual Systems, LLC

Hi David,

Yes. It's the dbx AFS2.

Truly,
Emad

So it improved the gain before feedback?  The results exceeded your expectations?
Logged
Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman
River Delta Audio is now:

Ghost Audio Visual Solutions, LLC
Cleveland OH
www.ghostav.rocks

Ray Aberle

  • Classic LAB
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3413
  • Located in Vancouver, WA (and serves OR-WA-ID-BC)
    • Kelcema Audio

So it improved the gain before feedback?  The results exceeded your expectations?
Stay tuned for next month's post: "My system sounds like mud."
Logged
Kelcema Audio
Regional - Serving Pacific Northwest (OR, WA, ID, BC)
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.062 seconds with 21 queries.