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Author Topic: Cables through the crowd area  (Read 3699 times)

Taylor Hall

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2018, 10:26:51 am »

On a scale of 1-10...5.  I have some Pyle ramps too and they're not up to par when compared to the higher-dollar ramps.  My biggest gripe is that the tabs used to connect multiple pieces aren't dovetailed...so one kick and it comes apart.  This isn't a big deal when crossing a simple sidewalk (which can be done with one or two segments), but for longer runs across grass you'll drive yourself crazy trying to keep it all together.  At the same time, I believe they're still the cheapest option for "real" cable ramps, and I wouldn't use anything less.  Hope this helps!
That's about my exact sentiments for these as well. We only use them as covers in areas that we know will be infrequently traveled (or only by our techs) or where an after the fact scenario comes up where we have to adapt on the fly to a client request or other unforeseen circumstance. There's not much you can do about keeping them together over uneven terrain apart from taping the joints, but we found that heating the piss out of them to remove all warping went a long way along with heating the joints while they were connected to one another, it made them fit together better and not want to pop loose as easily. I guess the molds have long since been out of spec, but not enough to warrant reproducing them...
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Mal Brown

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2018, 10:27:42 am »


I guess you like the Pyle.  Recommended?  They all look to be made by the same firm, then branded and sold.



Yes. You are both right. Up-to-date liability ins, and due diligence.  Due diligence includes seeking out best presentative practices.   


frank

like is too strong a word...   They are a complete but necessary evil.   Heavy, smelly to start - plan on an extended air out.  Subject to the complaints above.  Still, Ill add another 40 during the off season.  The checkmate locking stuff is just way too expensive at my level.
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Riley Casey

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2018, 10:54:41 am »

Rent some cable ramps. You really aren't making enough on this gig to defend the lawsuit you may incur.  Even your own insurance vendor will bail on you if they can find that you didn't follow industry standard practices for safety.

Rob Spence

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2018, 11:44:41 am »

To the OP
Could you elaborate on the physical arrangement . What gear is near tree? What cables need to cross audience area?

A generator for near tree and a wireless link for getting audio to the tree area if needed?


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Doug Johnson

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2018, 04:36:52 pm »

I have about 75 feet of cable ramps similar to what you link to an they have worked well for me.  They have come in especially handy for that one cord across the street that is suppose to be closed to vehicles.  I don't think they would hold up to heavy traffic.  I did leave them out for about a month to gas off after I got them.  I also had an issue with the wire that is used for the hinge falling out. I filled the end of the holes with epoxy.  For your gig, I would probibly use heavy rubber backed carpet.
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2018, 05:45:31 pm »

I also have some of the Pyle ramps.  Obviously not the full standard thing but I also look at it as due diligence for my level.  And more legit than laying carpet runners over the cables.

Previously I had built some wooden ones which had much steeper angles, someone in a wheelchair would have definitely had a problem.  Then I was doing a municipal music in the park thing and some kid was driving his RC car over it at speed, launching it into the air.  I was really concerned that he was going to hit someone and I would be blamed for providing the launch ramp. 
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frank kayser

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #16 on: October 22, 2018, 06:03:10 pm »

To the OP
Could you elaborate on the physical arrangement . What gear is near tree? What cables need to cross audience area?

A generator for near tree and a wireless link for getting audio to the tree area if needed?


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Hi Rob,


Small oddly shaped area in front of a new development, specifically there a restaurant entrance most nearby.


The area is maybe 50x50' narrowing to a sidewalk wrapping around the building. There is a very small "green space" between the site and the street.


Tree is set maybe 10' from that green space.  Around the tree - call that narrow spot facing the green space/street, 0 degrees.  Nothing there.  90 degrees clockwise is where the performers will be.  Some lights on the talent, and some blinders facing that direction,
Another 90 degrees (now 180) is the restaurant door and wall.  Last year, I set up along this wall.  There is maybe 30' between the tree base to the wall - this is a major walking thoroughfare. Last year, it was through this area that I ran power and an 8x4 snake. Power for the lights and speakers, snake - well what snakes do.
At 270 degrees, essentially the back of the tree.  Still a fair amount of folks -still along the wall not quite 270 degrees is the warming station with beverages, and a bit farther down, the radio station booth.
As I remember, I had to run a pretty long power cable to the table where the mixer sat, and then to the tree. My power paralleled the cord for the tree lights.  Theirs was light gauge cord, taped down - no chance os sharing.


If I move the mixer to the tree stand at 315 degrees, then it is strictly power.  A genny there would eliminate all cables in the foot paths.


Then all that's left is lights.  Blinders can come from between the tree and the acts, and there could be one stand in the green space to light the performers faces from stage left.



Rent some cable ramps. You really aren't making enough on this gig to defend the lawsuit you may incur.  Even your own insurance vendor will bail on you if they can find that you didn't follow industry standard practices for safety.


Thanks, Riley.  I had not considered that the ins vendor could bail.  Serious food for thought.


Using a generator is the best way to go in limiting your liability.
I assume that your event is outdoors so a genny would not be a problem.
(I have never had a client balk at the idea of me using a generator instead of wires all over.)
Just explain your rationale to the people in charge.  You should not have a problem....as long as it doesn't rain..

I will always assume that if I had one foot of exposed cable on a football field, some 80 YO lady will find it and stumble on it...

Why stress yourself over it??

My local Home Depot rents Honda 2000 generators at $50.00 per 24 hour period.  Totally worth it for peace-of-mind.

I need to make sure client will accept that as a solution.


Frank,

I've done a lot of tree lightings, probably 15 or 16. I know every area and situation is different, but I have found that heavy duty rubber-backed rugs work the best in situations like tree lightings.  They lay lower thereby providing less of a trip hazard and are heavy enough that they don't move. If it rains or if you have wet snow they really don't move, but become heavier than crap.

The biggest obstacle I've had to deal with at those things is power. I always have the city electric company test the "weather-proof" outlets and then test them myself later but before the event. I usually end up using 1 amp and daisy chaining several speakers  just because of the cable hazard/power thing.

Also, if it is really cold, have warm, fresh batteries. And have an extra wireless on stand by. Have a helper if you are going to have groups sing, especially kids and place the mics after they get into position and move them as soon as they are done. Talk to all the people involved including the local police to ask about parking, loading, unloading because a lot of times these things involve  streets being closed and all the happy horse crap that comes up with these things.

Good Luck.

Scott


I've seen carpets over cables in more paces than I care to count, including every carnival for their heavy power runs.  IMO, that provides the lowest profile for folks to walk over.  To Riley's point, good enough, and standard enough?  I advance the site, and test the power.  Last year, I thought I was golden during advance, only to find the tree and snow making machine, and me vying for the same outlet.  The snowmaker was rated at 20a.  Another reason for the genny.


And thanks for all the feedback on the Pyle (and other) ramps.  I heard they need quite a bit of "seasoning" outside. (as in Spring Summer Fall and Winter).  I had looked at pictures of them and I thought I was missing something not seeing any locking mechanism on the tabs. 


thanks guys!


frank
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Aaron Maurer

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2018, 03:22:50 pm »

https://unimattraffic-us.com/2-channel-industrial-cable-protector.html

What is the thoughts on this cable ramp?  Seems like they have a much more robust way of connecting them together. With shipping they are $50 a piece. 
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Kevin Maxwell

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2018, 06:16:48 pm »

https://unimattraffic-us.com/2-channel-industrial-cable-protector.html

What is the thoughts on this cable ramp?  Seems like they have a much more robust way of connecting them together. With shipping they are $50 a piece.

People will trip on them.
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Debbie Dunkley

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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2018, 06:24:27 pm »

I have a few that look similar  - different supplier on eBay - but same connecting lugs and I like the way they lock in.
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Re: Cables through the crowd area
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2018, 06:24:27 pm »


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