ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Active Monitor for Guitar  (Read 1006 times)

Jay Marr

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 500
Re: Active Monitor for Guitar
« Reply #20 on: October 11, 2018, 09:00:14 am »

As particular as guitarists are about " their " sound, I had always found it odd that which FRFR speaker they used was so complicated. My brain is already saying that playing the guitar through a digital unit and hearing it back as if it was already miced and in a room is wrong. Forget what it sounds like sonically, it is just a little weird. I have been doing it so long the conventional way that anything else is foreign. My thought process of which FRFR speaker to buy is more a matter of practicality more so than the sound. Conceptually, if you play through a speaker that is not like the one you are using, it will not sound the same. So ideally you would desire to use a speaker that is the most like the one you're using. The preamps have full parametric EQ in them that can dial in the desired sound from there, so owning a speaker that sounds meh before any EQ work is sort of trivial really.

Dialing in tones on a modeler (if you want the most consistent results) should be done on flat studio monitors.  You use an IR (Impulse Response - from a guitar cab) that is closest to your preferred cabinet for the tone you are dialing.
This gives you the best starting point for a FOH engineer to work from.  If his system is dialed well, they often use zero Eq.

So the best way to now monitor yourself on stage is with a flat speaker (ideally close to studio monitor quality) so that you are hearing exactly what YOU dialed in.
If you are monitoring through a mixer and have PEQ to 'fix' your monitor, then you can certainly go with a monitor that is not ideal sounding, and just apply corrective Eq, to get close to the sound you dialed in.  But most modeling guitarists are plugging right into their speaker.  So if you dial in a perfect tone on studio monitors, but your gig monitor is a scooped-mid Mackie Thump....then your modeler may sound like crap.  You now Eq your modeler to fix what you are hearing out of that Mackie Thump, and now you are sending a signal with way too much mid range, to the FOH engineer.  If you had that running through the RCF NX12, it would sound excellent.

I personally run through my mixer, and into (most nights) a crappy JBL JRX12 (even though I own RCF NX12, Atomic CLR, Yamaha DSR112)....why?  Because my monitor is a $100 beer rag.  It gets destroyed by drunk idiots every night.  So I use the PEQ on my mixer to get that JBL sounding 'acceptable'. 
The big difference may be - where you are putting that wedge on stage.
I put mine in front of me (and I'm the singer), so it's covered in 'people' every night.
If I am at a room that has in house PA, I may still put a wedge behind me....and that is the night I bring the RCF.
Logged

Mike Pyle

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 868
  • Santa Rosa, CA
Re: Active Monitor for Guitar
« Reply #21 on: October 11, 2018, 01:04:47 pm »

I have clients using both the NX12 and NX10 with great success. As noted earlier the tone is very similar other than a little more low response from the NX12. The 10 might also have a little wider sweet spot due to the cone diameter.

For lower budget applications the DXR10 has worked out okay.
Logged
Mike Pyle  Audiopyle Sound  707-315-6204
Dealer For: JBL, Soundcraft, Crown, dbx, AKG, Yorkville, EV, QSC, RCF, FBT, Danley Sound Labs, Tannoy, Lab Gruppen, Powersoft, VTC, EAW, Allen & Heath, Ashly, APB, Denon, Rane, Audix, One Systems, OnPoint Audio, Presonus, K&M, Ultimate, Global Truss, Road Ready, SKB, Gator, Radial Engineering, Turbosound, Midas, dB Technologies, American DJ, Odyssey, ProCo, Rapco, CBI, Elation, Mipro, Chauvet, Blizzard, Shure, Whirlwind, BenQ, Bassboss, Yamaha, Line 6, Behringer, Whirlwind, On-Stage, more...
Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Up
 


Page created in 0.084 seconds with 22 queries.