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Author Topic: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?  (Read 2051 times)

Jean-Pierre Coetzee

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #30 on: October 11, 2018, 11:04:26 am »

I would say it depends.

With modern Dante/Ravenna/AES networks I would say that the actual console is 100% digital. You don't need to control the pre from the console and in some situations it isn't controlled from the console and likewise you don't need to convert to analogue from the console you could very well be sending a digital stream somewhere else and the converts to analogue.

Pre-amps are digital but a RIO is really not part of the CL5 console, it will operate without a CL5 no problem so it is a dedicated stage box, the CL5 is the console and save for the omni in/out there are no analogue ports on there. Going back to the RIO once again it isn't part of the console.
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Daniel Rugotzke

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2018, 03:27:01 am »

Technically, the encoders (faders, knobs, and possibly buttons) on most digital mixer control surfaces are analog.  These encoders are converted to digital values that then control manipulation of the audio data.  All the audio processing is digital.
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Mac Kerr

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2018, 11:38:05 am »

Technically, the encoders (faders, knobs, and possibly buttons) on most digital mixer control surfaces are analog.  These encoders are converted to digital values that then control manipulation of the audio data.  All the audio processing is digital.

Is my understanding of encoders mistaken? I think the only thing analog about them is that they have a linear sliding knob. Instead of a constantly variable resistance they create a string of pulses, a digital output.

Mac
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2018, 11:46:40 am »

Is my understanding of encoders mistaken? I think the only thing analog about them is that they have a linear sliding knob. Instead of a constantly variable resistance they create a string of pulses, a digital output.

Mac
This pedantic inspection of minutiae related to the glue components and circuitry around a digital mixer is not very informative (IMO).

Indeed digital encoders deliver a digital code output (duh) that digital processors can accept directly. Analog pots and faders used to control digital consoles generate a varying analog voltage, that gets digitized by A/D convertors for use controlling the digital signal inside the digital domain.

JR

 
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Don Boomer

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #34 on: October 13, 2018, 12:01:22 pm »

if you think about it a power switch is on/off so kind of digital   ;D   

So you are making a big assumnption that the power switch is an on/off switch. It might not actually be so.

Just poking at you bro  ;)
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Don Boomer
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #35 on: October 13, 2018, 02:11:46 pm »

So you are making a big assumnption that the power switch is an on/off switch. It might not actually be so.

Just poking at you bro  ;)

Power switches are generally two state... either on or off... the definition of binary (digital).

I have designed on/off switches in battery powered products that both provide analog voltage to boot up the processor, and a digital switch input for the processor to use alternately depending on previous state. When it's time to turn off this digital input tells the processor to stop holding the power supply on.

This is the way most web discussions go, too much info only vaguely related to the OP's question.  ::)

JR
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David Allred

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2018, 03:50:15 pm »

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Jay Barracato

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2018, 06:40:26 pm »

Very George Costanza of you. ;D
https://youtu.be/-cYpEsY_WGY
How's this for pedantic:

Devices aren't analog or digital, signals are.

Using electricity to transfer a signal is different from using electricity as a power source.

Is my bedroom light analog or digital?

When noise is superimposed on a digital signal, does the circuit suddenly become analog?

If my m32 takes in an analog signal and outputs a predictable analog signal, can I consider it an analog device? ( From the standpoint of system design, yes).

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

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Jay Barracato

Steve Loewenthal

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2018, 07:24:44 pm »

This pedantic inspection of minutiae related to the glue components and circuitry around a digital mixer is not very informative (IMO)...

IMO, the OP was an invitation for pedantic inspection of minutiae. Something this forum is often very good at. While some parts of this discussion may or may not be informative, it has certainly provided enjoyment for myself and hopefully others. Please continue with the inspection of minutiae.


Devices aren't analog or digital, signals are.

Yes

Power switches are generally two state... either on or off... the definition of binary (digital).

Just because something is binary does not make it digital. The British measurement of volume and weight is basically binary (OK Base 2 for some) (2 teaspoons to a tablespoon (ignoring some history) 2 table spoons to an ounce, a couple of forgotten antiquated intermediate measurements, 2 cups to a pint, then quart, another forgotten intermediate, gallon)
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Steve Loewenthal

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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: What parts of a digitial mixer are digital?
« Reply #39 on: October 13, 2018, 08:41:53 pm »

IMO, the OP was an invitation for pedantic inspection of minutiae. Something this forum is often very good at. While some parts of this discussion may or may not be informative, it has certainly provided enjoyment for myself and hopefully others. Please continue with the inspection of minutiae.
you asked for it...
Quote

Yes
this is an old conceit, but yes individual circuitry inside digital ICs are linear analog*** components configured to perform digital functions.
Quote
Just because something is binary does not make it digital.
I stand corrected... just messing...

on/off switches are "bi-state".  Digital math is binary, or hex, or octal, or...
Quote
The British measurement of volume and weight is basically binary (OK Base 2 for some) (2 teaspoons to a tablespoon (ignoring some history) 2 table spoons to an ounce, a couple of forgotten antiquated intermediate measurements, 2 cups to a pint, then quart, another forgotten intermediate, gallon)
huh...  maybe?

JR

*** if we drill down to individual electrons and holes it becomes almost digital again, but we don't get down that small, yet.
 
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