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Author Topic: Peavey Illuminator 600 - Use of LEDs Question  (Read 165 times)

Paul Boos

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Peavey Illuminator 600 - Use of LEDs Question
« on: October 08, 2018, 08:47:05 am »

I recently picked up a Peavey Illuminator 600. I've been testing things out on it and the microphone doesn't seem to work. That's ok as I really don't plan to use the chase or pulse pattern, but to use it for swapping around between static colors using the channel overrides. These work perfectly.

My thought was to swap to LED lights from incandescent to reduce the heat produced and power consumption. I bought some nice Phillips LEDs. What I noticed though was that the LEDs don't go off entirely and the ones where the controls go in flicker strobe like. They do go out entirely if I do blackout.t

Anyone have any idea if the reason the LEDs won't go out is interference or bleed power that perhaps incandescent isn't sensitive to? Recommendations? I had really hoped not to use incandescents.

Thanks in advance,
Paul
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Paul Boos

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Re: Peavey Illuminator 600 - Use of LEDs Question
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2018, 06:58:53 am »

I've learned that it is a potential bleed in power that causes the LEDs to not go fully off. Evidently they are more sensitive. If someone can shed some additional light on how to solve this (no pun intended or is there?), I would appreciate it. For example, are some vendor bulbs more or less susceptible? Is there a way to lower the bleed?

Thanks in advance (again),
Paul
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Taylor Hall

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Re: Peavey Illuminator 600 - Use of LEDs Question
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2018, 10:18:31 am »

LEDs operate on a MUCH narrower voltage range than incandescent bulbs (somewhere between 1-3V for various color diodes). This is the reason that you see LED bulbs for home use clearly labeled as dimming or non-dimming. They have built in circuitry that translates the wider voltage sweeps coming from standard in-wall dimmers into something the LEDs can handle.

Just swapping an LED bulb into your fixture will cause the issues like you're seeing now. Ideally, you would need to redo the circuitry that controls the voltage output to the bulbs to work within the LED's operating range. You could try using bulbs that support dimming, but they will probably still have issues.

Given the age of these things, you might be better off just upgrading to something newer.
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Peavey Illuminator 600 - Use of LEDs Question
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2018, 08:40:47 pm »

If someone can shed some additional light on how to solve this (no pun intended or is there?), I would appreciate it.

Hi Paul, the heart of the matter comes down to the type of load each device places on a circuit.  An incandescent lamp is a purely restive load.  LEDs are well, diodes.  They behave very differently when it comes to placing them in circuits (one is AC, the other is DC at the element level, for starters).  Since your light was designed for incandescent lamps, the switching circuitry in the unit may not completely cut the voltage to each lamp when it is supposed to be off.  A triac control circuit would be an example of this, whereas a relay control circuit should be a complete "off".  Adding a dummy load in parallel with an LED light source can sometimes fix this issue when connecting things to dimmers, but it's still dicey as to whether or not it'll work.  It's also considered bad practice, among other things.  Since your light is an integrated unit, I don't think this is a practical idea here since the load needs to be downstream of the control circuity.

Dimming LED bulbs is a completely different can of worms despite having a similar end result.

Honestly, either use your unit as it was intended or go buy what you need - there's really no sense in trying to modify it.  They make LED versions of this exact same effect that can be had for probably less than you spent on your 4 LED bulbs...certainly if you buy more LED bulbs to experiment!  Good luck!       
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