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Author Topic: Large Screen Video  (Read 6809 times)

StJohn Gill II

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2006, 07:07:39 am »

We have a 3 screen set-up at church with 2 video mixers and 4 cameras. 16:9 is cool but if you are on a budget fairly unrealistic. all our stuff is still 4:3 even though the cameras are all capable of HD 16:9. Anyway, most stuff is still in 4:3. for HOW stuff i think 4:3 is still better because you have more room above words for camera image if that is what you are going to do or may want to get into in the future. If the projection system is only for words, you might as well save some money and stay in 4:3 anyway.

How big is your church? Chances are that a 16x12 screen with a widescreen video in the middle will be fine on the odd occasion anyways.

Easiest way to work out what lens you need. Most lenses  will come with a zoom factor like 3-5 or so. What this means is that the lens will focus and zoom to the size if the screen from a distance of 3 to 5 times the width of the screen. Pretty easy. i.e your projection point is 3.75 times as far away from the screen as the screen is wide, so a 3-5 lens will do you just fine.

To work out brightness: it depends on a lot of things. The way i buy a new projector is to ring up a couple of companies, mark out the size of the screen if i dont have the screen and get them to bring projectors with the right zoom from about $500 below my "budget" to about $1000 above my "budget' and see if i can get one of the "too expensive" ones into my price bracket. Never failed yet!!!! Also, sometimes the cheaper ones will bring a brghter image at a lower quality that may not even be a problem with your set-up, it has happened at a couple of installs i've been helping people out with. Anwyay, just try a few and work out what you want - just make sure you have all the stage lighting that could throw onto the acreen on if possible when testing to make sure you get an accurate representation of what is going on.
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Brian Kent Tennyson

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2006, 12:32:57 pm »

Kent Clasen wrote on Tue, 10 January 2006 08:38

Hi Brian!

Are there higher power/lower cost 16:9 native projectors available now, or are you resizing native 4:3 projectors?  Is there a decrease in quality in using 16:9 mode on a native 4:3 projector?

Thanks for the info.


Christie has the LW40U 4500 ANSI for around $10,000. They also have the LW25U with 2200 ANSI for around $6,000. Both are OEM products from Sanyo so they are basically the same. The PLV-WF10 and the PLV-80 respectively.
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Brian Kent Tennyson
Visitec Inc.
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Kevin Maxwell AKA TheMAXX

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2006, 01:01:08 pm »

I don’t remember where I found this but a standard television (tube type) is equal to 45-foot lumens. So if you want your screen to be equal to a TV you divide the projector lumens by the square footage of the screen. So if you have a 9-foot by 12-foot screen, that is equal to 108 square feet. If the projector output is 5000 lumens then take that number and divide it by the 108 and you get about 46.3 foot lumens, just a tiny bit brighter then a standard TV. Now this doesn’t take into account the type of screen used. If you have a high gain screen it will be a bit different and should be able to be calculated. But the real killer is how much light is hitting the screen. Whatever is brightest wins.

I hope this is of some help.  
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Kevin Maxwell
Freelance Audio Eng. QBE

Roy Richards

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2006, 09:32:21 pm »

I have a Christie DS30 at work that developed a problem requiring factory service, it took 4 weeks to get it back. It was only 18 months old, but they said it was already discontinued so they could not expedite.

Brian, what kind of support have you had from Christie? I have been less than impressed, as they will only deal with the vendor I purchased the unit through. I prefer to cut the vendor out of the equation once I own the item.
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Brian Kent Tennyson

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2006, 11:25:42 am »

All of my support issues have been delt with through the vendor. Since Christie protects their line (you can't buy it at a knocked off price from an internet dealer in North Dakota) their whole system is probably set up to serve their vendors. I have found that most of the more reputable vendors have protected lines, it keeps much tighter control over what clients are promised, how service is handled and who is trained to handle field service.

Of course, on any forum, we will find exceptions to every rule, good or bad. I'm sure Christie's service satisfaction isn't 100%. Nor do I have any vested interest in Christie as a company.

My suggestion, to anyone who cares, is to find a good vendor and let them do the dirty work on warranty. You pay a higher price for a Christie projector, or Wolfvision Doc Camera or Bi-Amp audio processor, but a lot of what you are paying for is service from you vendor, don't be afraid to rely on them for service.

My three issues have been with out of box or during installation, and they may have been delt with quicker because I'm a consultant (I never really thought about it that way before), one issue was fan noise, they replaced the unit, one issue was color matching with two other LCD projectors, they replaced the unit and one was from me pushing the lens adjustment beyond the acceptable range in a 10k Rodie and damaging the light engine, they flew a guy out and replace the light engine the next day and apologised to me for not making the instruction manual more clear.

I have contractors that swear by Eiki (i don't like their processing) Some that love NEC. I just looked at a $3000 3500ANSI single chip DLP form Optoma yesterday that looked awesome.

Anyway, I would give your vendor a chance, you might get farther that way.
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Brian Kent Tennyson
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David Hadfield

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2006, 04:57:17 am »

We are currently running 2 16x12 rear projection screens using NEC MT1050 2100 lumen LCD projectors. We paid $10,000 (Aus) each for them 4 years back and are looking to upgrade to 16x9 format. We upgraded our camera system in July to Sony cameras (SD) and have been running 16x9 on the 4x3 screens. This photo gives you an idea of how it looks and/or will look when we make our existing screens wider (front projected with Mitsubishi 3900 lumen proj.)

index.php/fa/4009/0/

We are looking at getting the brightest projector we can for the best price and will still go rear projection as it works better for us - the only problem is the extra expense of short throw lenses as to get the width we would lose to much space backstage (looking at $16,000 Aus, each for NEC 6000 lumens with lens). We blank out the area so no ambient light gets onto the back of the screen. Going front projection wouldn't work for us with our current PA - but even a new PA (hopefully sooner than later, line array???) wouldn't allow such. We also use smoke regularly which would impede the front option.

I have also found that as far as auto screens, 4x3 is far cheaper than 16x9 (like half the cost) and you can still do 16x9 just without a pretty black border.

We use a local (Aus) product called Presenter for word overlays and have found it to be easy to use and almost fool proof.


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Roy Richards

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2006, 02:29:58 pm »

Interesting that Powerpoint was originally called Presenter before Microsoft bought it. Wonder if the Aus version is related.
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Roy Richards

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2006, 02:37:29 pm »

Have you checked into using a mirror or two to increase your distance? I have a system at work that fills an 8 foot wide screen rear projected in a 36 inch deep case that uses two mirrors to bounce the signal making the depth 3 times actual. Works nicely.
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Brian Kent Tennyson

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2006, 05:58:33 pm »

Also, beware of anything below a 1.3 lens as you will start to get a hot spot in the middle of your image.
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Brian Kent Tennyson
Visitec Inc.
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David Hadfield

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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2006, 12:14:32 am »

Interesting that Powerpoint was originally called Presenter before Microsoft bought it. Wonder if the Aus version is related. Roy Richards NRBC Media


I think you will find it is somewhat different - made specifically for churches. Have a look

http://www.discoverysystems.com.au/presenter/default.htm

We haven't used/seen any of the other stuff available but this works well for us.
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Re: Large Screen Video
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2006, 12:14:32 am »


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