ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Classical Trio reinforcement  (Read 1825 times)

Weogo Reed

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 263
  • Western NC,
    • LiveEdge
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2018, 10:54:30 pm »

Hi Wes,

A mic like the Rode NT4 would work nicely.
If mixing to mono, this would minimize multi-element phase issues.
Also, you get left/right level control.  For center control, you have to move the mic forward or back a bit.
Mics like this are very nice as a Drum overhead, and quite a few other applications, like
rotating it in the clip 90 degrees for close-micing a Clarinet going to wedges.

Olsen Windtech has the big furry windscreens, and Rycote.

Good health,  Weogo



Hey, folks!

I'm doing a local summer concert series and bumped into an act that I'm not sure how to reinforce. I usually do big band, rock, country, singer-songwriter, etc acts.

This is a trio, consisting of flute, bassoon, and clarinet.  They sit close together, facing inward at each other.  Bassoon in the middle/back, facing the audience.  The "room" is an outdoor gazebo built about a hundred years ago with an interesting roof shape...it sounds VERY good and projects quite well for what it is.

My instinct is to throw up a pair of mics in front of the group and 4' off the ground  (above the level of the flute tone hole -- maybe above the bassoon bell as well?). I suspect that close-mic'ing would be a mistake for this group, since they should be able to balance their mix on their own.

Next is the other issue - I own the usual dynamics, but my only condensers are pencils for drum overheads.  Should I be looking at picking up a pair of LDCs?   I could potentially budget, maybe 400 US for this..but I don't know if I'd ever use them again.

Maybe something like a pair of PGA27As?  (I stay away from the PG series for dynamics...same rule for condensers?) .... Rhode NT1s seem to be out of my budget... maybe AT2035s?

Or maybe I should use a pair of MD421s or e902s?  Is there are a reason folks are using LDCs in this application?

And where do I get dead cats for big mics like these?
Logged

Chris Grimshaw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1557
  • Sheffield, UK
    • Grimshaw Audio
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2018, 03:58:09 am »

I use a pair of older AKG C3000B, equivalent to the newer C4000B.  Either of those have cardioid and hyper cardioid settings as well as LPF.  The newer C3000B do not.

I use them in ensemble or choral or taiko settings.  In taiko, due to the movement I supplement with a pair of Omni reference mics in XY center stage and actively mix.  I have done some trad bluegrass with 1 centered too.  (in my case I take the bass separaty, unless the artist objects - almost never.)  Mostly I see David Gage Realist pickups installed or the ear trumpet condenser wedged in at the bridge anyway.

I bought a stereo pair of the older c3000B AKGs used around $300.  They have proven quite useful

https://www.ebay.com/itm/AKG-C4000B-condenser-microphone/123182366495?hash=item1cae3dbf1f:g:IZ4AAOSwVxtbHVQj

Here is an eBay link to a used C4000B.

Mal, I think you're referring to the original C3000 mics - black body, green stripe and three red switches on the back.
I have a couple of those, too, and like them.

Not sure how you're using omni mics in an X-Y configuration. That implies they're coincident and at ~90 degrees to each other, which won't make a lot of difference between the two mics. For omnis, I find a spaced pair to be useful for recording larger ensembles. An X-Y configuration should be done with directional mics, or it won't work.

Chris
Logged
Sheffield-based sound engineering.
www.grimshawaudio.com

John Daniluk (JD)

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 69
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2018, 11:37:32 am »

try a sm58 overhead from the back over the flute and a sm58 on the floor between the bassoon and clarinet.  The 58 will remove some of the crowd noise.   You should get good gain before feed back.     You may have to invert one of the mics.  It is not great but it works.....

jd
Logged

Wes Garland

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 145
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2018, 06:25:08 pm »

Jeez, John - that's an interesting idea.  I have tried close-miking flutes before in big band contexts and it's always been a giant PITA coming in from the front. Thanks!  That's a trick I will keep in my back pocket for sure!
Logged

Wes Garland

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 145
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #14 on: June 29, 2018, 05:56:01 pm »

How does the Rhode NT5 compare to the AT PRO37 for this application?  They are only 12.7% more expensive, and have a 10 year warranty.

The NT5 appears to have a much flatter response curve than the PRO37 (thanks, BTW, for the EQ starting point!)...both on-axis and off-axis, looking at the polar pattern.  Sensitivity seems to be better for the PRO37, but I have good enough preamps (X32).  I don't know how to compare self-noise / noise floor.

Something about this mic I'm missing?

Wes
Logged

Stephen Kirby

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3006
Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2018, 08:56:27 pm »

Jeez, John - that's an interesting idea.  I have tried close-miking flutes before in big band contexts and it's always been a giant PITA coming in from the front. Thanks!  That's a trick I will keep in my back pocket for sure!
Similar to micing a drummer or acoustic guitar over the shoulder.  The mic hears what the musician hears.
Logged

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Classical Trio reinforcement
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2018, 08:56:27 pm »


Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.026 seconds with 23 queries.