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Teaching Lighting Class

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Nathan Riddle:
Couldn't decide which subforum (lighting, church sound, HOW); mods move as you see fit.

Referencing this post:
http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,167699

I'll be teaching two classes.

1) "Moving Lights & Worship" (using moving lights in worship)
2) "Enhance Worship with Color" (using color to enhance worship)

Wanted to get some ideas/thoughts you experts might have.

1)
I'd go over the types of lights briefly (par, fresnel, leko, etc)

Lamps/temp (LED, Arc, Halogen, Incandescent)

Then types of moving lights in depth (wash, spot, beam).

Tempo = Movement speed FX

etc.

2)
Types of color producing lights (LED vs gel)

Field & beam angle

Colors to produce (purple doesn't exist)

Look at the lyrics, not just colors in the words (fire = red, light = white) , but also look for symbolism: King = Royalty = Purple or Envy/Money = Green)

Listen to the mood/timber of the music = color

etc.

Erik Jerde:
The music flows from the lyric, the lyric from the scripture.  The music creates emotion which helps the congregant connect to God via the lyric.  The lighting needs to reinforce and/or enhance the emotion already present in the music.  Is the music introspective, quiet, personal or is it big, celebratory, shout it out?  It could be both and the lighting should help emphasize each mood.

At the core of it technology in worship should serve the sole purpose of supporting the mission and the vision of the organization.  Tie it back to that, give it great purpose rather than just a means of lighting the platform.  If you legitimately do that it gives you a much stronger position when people accuse you of rock concert/entertainment worship.  Not that worship shouldn't be fun at times, it should!

In my experience new/young lighting designers in church want to use all the toys all the time.  Less is more!  I know of churches that have rented in some really cool effects and used them at one moment in one song.  Because of the discipline in that programing choice the effect had great impact when used.  It's completely ok to have one look for an entire song if it's the right look.

The lighting designer/operator should know the music as well as the musicians (maybe better depending on your musicians!).  They should know it cold!  Color theory is super important for lighting people, that's why I'd rather train a visual artist to do lights than train an engineer in the visual arts.

Just a few thoughts, laundry needs folded and I gotta go keep my wife happy.  :)

Nathan Riddle:

--- Quote from: Erik Jerde on June 19, 2018, 08:45:34 pm ---At the core of it technology in worship should serve the sole purpose of supporting the mission and the vision of the organization.  Tie it back to that, give it great purpose rather than just a means of lighting the platform.  If you legitimately do that it gives you a much stronger position when people accuse you of rock concert/entertainment worship.  Not that worship shouldn't be fun at times, it should!

The music flows from the lyric, the lyric from the scripture.  The music creates emotion which helps the congregant connect to God via the lyric.  The lighting needs to reinforce and/or enhance the emotion already present in the music.  Is the music introspective, quiet, personal or is it big, celebratory, shout it out?  It could be both and the lighting should help emphasize each mood.

In my experience new/young lighting designers in church want to use all the toys all the time.  Less is more!  I know of churches that have rented in some really cool effects and used them at one moment in one song.  Because of the discipline in that programing choice the effect had great impact when used.  It's completely ok to have one look for an entire song if it's the right look.

The lighting designer/operator should know the music as well as the musicians (maybe better depending on your musicians!).  They should know it cold!  Color theory is super important for lighting people, that's why I'd rather train a visual artist to do lights than train an engineer in the visual arts.

Just a few thoughts, laundry needs folded and I gotta go keep my wife happy.  :)

--- End quote ---

I love where you started at. Definitely going to incorporate that into my presentation, thanks!

I might also add, that the pastor, worship leader, and LD are in a triangle not a hirearchy. They three ALL cast a vision for the church and come to an agreeance upon the lighting. The LD might execute, but they establish the goal from the churches' value.

For isntance, our creative team's mission is: "Using our God-given gifts in the arts to create engaging environments for worship"

Nathan Riddle:
The seminars got combined into one: "enhance worship with lighting." So we'll see where I take it haha. I do plan on recording mine somehow just for my own benefit and maybe to put on YouTube.

I definitely plan on bringing some of my lights and incorporating them into my session! I think I'll have access to an older fresnel and then I have S4 parnels & leko's. (In addition to moving lights: LED zoom wash RGBAW+UV & Beam/Spot/Wash hybrids)

I'm imagining a dark (controlled lighting) good sized room with high dark ceilings. A bit of haze. A projector to show what I'm doing on the lighting board (Jands Vista). TV's for the actual presentation. Have an outline for people to follow along with, and have some statements/questions with one word answers so they can be actively engaged. Then call on people to answer questions throughout.

Intro:
I'll start with an intro about myself, say I'm nervous about things. Been awhile since I've "publicly spoken," but my mom forced me to take 4H presentation classes, so I'm not quite a fish out of water ;) Give some background on my experience and how I got started.

Body 1:
Then move on into the core mission of a church with tech & lights. Establishing a line of communication between pastor, worship leader, LD to execute the church's vision.

Body 2:
Then move to technical. Talk about fixture types, lamp types, specific automated fixtures. Talk about beam/field angle. Talk about color theory.

Body 3:
Talk about music, tempo, timber, mood, etc. How lyrics affect colors. How instrumentation & speed affect the effects/speed of lights.

Demo:
Move on to actual demo time. Play a song, get some colors & tempo callouts from the crowd.

Conclusion:
Demo some colors I like, some effects I like, etc.

Questions:

---

Might be a bit of a squeeze for 1.25hrs, but If I write it out and practice it a lot I think I can do it.

Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: Nathan Riddle on June 22, 2018, 09:55:18 am ---The seminars got combined into one: "enhance worship with lighting." So we'll see where I take it haha. I do plan on recording mine somehow just for my own benefit and maybe to put on YouTube.

I definitely plan on bringing some of my lights and incorporating them into my session! I think I'll have access to an older fresnel and then I have S4 parnels & leko's. (In addition to moving lights: LED zoom wash RGBAW+UV & Beam/Spot/Wash hybrids)

I'm imagining a dark (controlled lighting) good sized room with high dark ceilings. A bit of haze. A projector to show what I'm doing on the lighting board (Jands Vista). TV's for the actual presentation. Have an outline for people to follow along with, and have some statements/questions with one word answers so they can be actively engaged. Then call on people to answer questions throughout.

Intro:
I'll start with an intro about myself, say I'm nervous about things. Been awhile since I've "publicly spoken," but my mom forced me to take 4H presentation classes, so I'm not quite a fish out of water ;) Give some background on my experience and how I got started.

Body 1:
Then move on into the core mission of a church with tech & lights. Establishing a line of communication between pastor, worship leader, LD to execute the church's vision.

Body 2:
Then move to technical. Talk about fixture types, lamp types, specific automated fixtures. Talk about beam/field angle. Talk about color theory.

Body 3:
Talk about music, tempo, timber, mood, etc. How lyrics affect colors. How instrumentation & speed affect the effects/speed of lights.

Demo:
Move on to actual demo time. Play a song, get some colors & tempo callouts from the crowd.

Conclusion:
Demo some colors I like, some effects I like, etc.

Questions:

---

Might be a bit of a squeeze for 1.25hrs, but If I write it out and practice it a lot I think I can do it.

--- End quote ---

I would pass on the self deprecating humor.  Just talk about yourself conversationally.

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