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Author Topic: Snare mics processing  (Read 1673 times)

Geert Friedhof

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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2018, 06:14:15 am »

And what is the sound the drummer is after?

The kit will sound different in every room.

Last night the drummer brought 3 different snares. He/we decided on a vintage 3-ply Slingerland.
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Jean-Pierre Coetzee

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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2018, 11:47:37 am »

Sorry, but I don't see how inverting almost everything makes sense

You hit a drum, you get a negative pressure travelling towards your ears.
Your mic picks that up, and produces a voltage that starts out negative.

That sounds like an ideal situation. Why would you screw that up by reversing the polarity on most of your mics?

Chris

You are mixing from the perspective of the drummer, I doubt 90% of the audience has ever sat behind a drum kit never mind play it as an instrument. I setup from the audiences perspective which is normal for most of the people, whether you invert 3 mics or all the other mics is irrelevant you can invert those I leave normal and get exactly the same results.

I'm mixing for the audience not the drummer, I want a compression to hit the audience first from the drum kit instead of a rarefaction, I feel it makes a better experience for the audience YMMW and I thought that the point of this forum is to give different approaches so people can try different ideas to see what works for them.

I would say try it, I've tried your method before, I don't like it, it's not wrong, I just don't like it. You might try my method and hate it and that's fine too were creative people and have the knowledge to justify either approach.
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Robert Lofgren

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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2018, 12:03:31 pm »

An important fact is that what sounds good acoustically many times doesn’t translate well to the speakers when you close mic audio sources.
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Jean-Pierre Coetzee

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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2018, 12:34:51 pm »

An important fact is that what sounds good acoustically many times doesn’t translate well to the speakers when you close mic audio sources.

This, tonight(it's tonight now) I dropped the snare mics and used the overheads alone because I like the effect more (and the drummer player the snare to death but the muso is never wrong).

I've also found with some times I asked the drummer to retune the second snare to get a specific effect we need for some songs, it sounded great through the system. Afterward the drummer asked me if it sounded good and he played the snare so that I can understand his perspective, acoustically it sounded like ass but it's exactly what was needed thought the system.
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Wayne Smith2

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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2018, 03:27:15 pm »

With a polarity inversion, you get an exaggerated bottom end, and the rest of the harmonic structure is screwed up, too. It doesn't sound like the snare drum that's being played.
[snip]
1ms is about 13", yes. It was the smallest time division I could get easily to try the concept. [snip]
I applaud experiments like this and delving into the 'how and whys of it. I'm glad I've gone round and around myself through the processes in my long humble home recording years.

But I would offer that this -a rather random inches' in arrival time turning out well, is but an example that demonstrates the any number of phase and difference combinations that may sound good, but not necessarily 'more true at all.
:>)

One of the 'perspectives I like -and approaches 'natural tone -depending, would be the snare mic away from the top skin, down towards the side.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 03:30:04 pm by Wayne Smith2 »
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Re: Snare mics processing
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2018, 03:27:15 pm »


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