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Author Topic: Changing plug from 220 to 110  (Read 4355 times)

Kevin Graf

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2018, 09:46:38 am »

Also be aware that US line voltage may be as high as 125V. A power transformer designed for 110V could be unhappy with 125V.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2018, 10:21:29 am »

Also be aware that US line voltage may be as high as 125V. A power transformer designed for 110V could be unhappy with 125V.
If the power amp can accept 220V it is unlikely to be bothered by 125V.

JR
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Geert Friedhof

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2018, 08:27:09 am »

European (IEC) colorcoding is

green/yellow=earth
blue=neutral
brown=hot/line/phase, you know: the one that hurts when touched...

Brown can also be black, if it is a switched, mobile or 3 phase (+grey) application.

Standard voltage here is 230V/50Hz. Used to be 220 on main land, 240 in the UK, but now all of Europe has 230V, -6% +10%.

All equipment has to be designed for +/- 10%

Some (most?) european power plugs can be inserted in 2 ways, like up or down, so the equipment is designed to accept phase at either pole. We can switch blue and brown at the powerplug. Earth always stays earth of course.

About the K10: The K10 should have a AWG10 cable, rated at 52A, with a AMP CPC 45A connector. It pulls 22.6A@1/4 power, according to the manual. It accepts 100-240 V @ 50-60Hz, +/- 10%, so you should be good.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2018, 09:13:02 am by Geert Friedhof »
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2018, 04:25:03 pm »

I havenít used this model powersoft amp but if itís at all like the x4 Iíve worked on the manual will have your answers.

Aaaand... it does. See the attached image, taken from the manual, specific to the K10.

You can see that it has a universal switch-mode power supply rated for any voltage from 100V to 240V, 50-60Hz AC. So no need for transformers and little need for voltage regulators.

Why, I'll bet that if you contacted Powersoft support, they'd be happy to sell you a cord appropriate for your region with all the proper safety listings.
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Kevin Graf

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2018, 08:36:53 am »

Also be aware that US line voltage may be as high as 125V. A power transformer designed for 110V could be unhappy with 125V.
If the power amp can accept 220V it is unlikely to be bothered by 125V.
JR
For 220V operation, it has two 110V coils connected in series (for 110V operation they are in parallel).
It's not about insulation breakdown, it's about core saturation.
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #15 on: March 02, 2018, 12:25:20 pm »

Except that with most modern "universal" power supplies that are rated from 90-240 VAC there are no transformer coils being switched from series to parallel.  If there is a 110-220 V selector switch that would be the case-but those are becoming few and far between.
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Ed Hall

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2018, 06:52:21 am »

...As stated, I'm new to the power side of things, the plug that is attached is actually a 120-30amp plug, an L5-30 locking plug. ...

Slightly off topic but related, isnít the L5-30 rated for 120V only and not 220V? If it were in use for 220V service shouldnít it have the L6-30?
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2018, 07:48:32 am »

Slightly off topic but related, isnít the L5-30 rated for 120V only and not 220V? If it were in use for 220V service shouldnít it have the L6-30?
You are correct.
They are mechanically different as well, so can't be used in the wrong outlet.
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Lance Hallmark

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2018, 04:37:10 pm »

Thank You everyone for the input & education.
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Kevin Graf

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2018, 05:34:43 pm »

Except that with most modern "universal" power supplies that are rated from 90-240 VAC there are no transformer coils being switched from series to parallel.  If there is a 110-220 V selector switch that would be the case-but those are becoming few and far between.
Of course.
But I was referring to legacy power amplifiers.
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Speedskater

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Re: Changing plug from 220 to 110
¬ę Reply #19 on: March 05, 2018, 05:34:43 pm ¬Ľ


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