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Author Topic: Sennheiser battery load.  (Read 2623 times)

Al Rettich

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Sennheiser battery load.
« on: January 26, 2018, 03:19:11 pm »

Quick question...

Sennheiser 2000 series wireless receiver, with a G3 transmitter. Will it eat the battery up almost twice is fast?
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2018, 05:38:22 pm »

Quick question...

Sennheiser 2000 series wireless receiver, with a G3 transmitter. Will it eat the battery up almost twice is fast?

Twice as fast as what? The transmitter is just transmitting, it doesn't know what equipment is receiving its signal. Why do you think it would use the battery faster? With few exceptions, the link between an RF mic transmitter and receiver is one way.

Mac
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Al Rettich

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2018, 10:00:59 am »

Normally Id agree, but we did a test yesterday.  Took the 2000 receiver and at 4 hours still had two bars of battery.  Replace them with a G3 transmitter and at the end of four hours it was flashing battery light.  We tried three different G3 transmitters with all the same issue. 
Twice as fast as what? The transmitter is just transmitting, it doesn't know what equipment is receiving its signal. Why do you think it would use the battery faster? With few exceptions, the link between an RF mic transmitter and receiver is one way.

Mac
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Andrew Broughton

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2018, 02:12:49 pm »

Normally Id agree, but we did a test yesterday.  Took the 2000 receiver and at 4 hours still had two bars of battery.  Replace them with a G3 transmitter and at the end of four hours it was flashing battery light.  We tried three different G3 transmitters with all the same issue. 
You're not making sense, Al.
You took a receiver and replaced it with a transmitter?

You can take any transmitter and have a receiver or not. If you power the transmitter on, the battery will die at the same speed regardless of the receiver. Did you think there was some sort of communication between the receiver and transmitter?

Now, if you are asking if the g3 transmitter sucks through batteries faster than the 2000 transmitter, then sure, there could be a difference, they're different products! Changing the transmission power settings will affect battery life as well.
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-Andy

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Brian J Holder

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2018, 02:38:06 pm »

If it was the receiver that you changed, then the difference seen would be in the two receivers method of interpreting the battery voltage. The easiest way to check the battery condition is to measure its terminal voltage under a realistic load, say 15 ohms for an AA cell. You would then have a base
line to check that the receiver battery indicator is making sense.
Brian
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Andrew Broughton

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2018, 03:59:44 pm »

Tell you one thing, I can get about 4x the battery life out of the Sennheiser receivers over the Shures.

First pic is a Sennheiser EK2000 powered by a pair of Imedion rechargables.
2nd pic is a Shure P10R powered by Procell vs Imedion.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 05:20:47 pm by Andrew Broughton »
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-Andy

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Al Rettich

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2018, 08:52:26 pm »

Andy, yes the G3 transmitters are sucking the life out of a set of batteries.  The upper line 2000s you could easily go almost a dozen hours before getting a dead battery.  Not so with the G3s.  So I was wondering if anyone had experience this before.  Same set of Procells when you meter them before are almost exactly the same. Im wondering if with the G3 transmitter if there is something that puts a heavier strain on the batts. 
You're not making sense, Al.
You took a receiver and replaced it with a transmitter?

You can take any transmitter and have a receiver or not. If you power the transmitter on, the battery will die at the same speed regardless of the receiver. Did you think there was some sort of communication between the receiver and transmitter?

Now, if you are asking if the g3 transmitter sucks through batteries faster than the 2000 transmitter, then sure, there could be a difference, they're different products! Changing the transmission power settings will affect battery life as well.
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Al Rettich

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2018, 08:54:44 pm »

How are you getting accurate info like this? Are you taking the batts out and metering them? I know how Shure gets their info for their rechargeables.  Just wondering. 
Tell you one thing, I can get about 4x the battery life out of the Sennheiser receivers over the Shures.

First pic is a Sennheiser EK2000 powered by a pair of Imedion rechargables.
2nd pic is a Shure P10R powered by Procell vs Imedion.
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Andrew Broughton

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2018, 12:03:29 pm »

How are you getting accurate info like this? Are you taking the batts out and metering them? I know how Shure gets their info for their rechargeables.  Just wondering. 
I have a data logger which I can connect to a beltpack. I've measured voltage, current draw, lots of things on my beltpacks while sitting at multi-day runs...

I've never measured the g3, but in terms of what affects battery life, the only thing is volume level and headphone load.
Once they're powered on, they draw the same regardless of the signal being sent to them. The 2000 series has a DC-DC converter so the beltpack keeps working even when the batteries are low. Maybe they don't have that in the G3?

[edit]My measurements are on the IEM receivers, btw. I missed that you were speaking about handheld/beltpack TRANSMITTERS. My bad.[/edit]

Ok, well, check the RF output setting. Maybe you have the g3 set to 100mW and the 2000 to 10?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2018, 12:07:23 pm by Andrew Broughton »
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-Andy

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Jay Marr

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Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2018, 12:51:02 pm »

Quick question...

Sennheiser 2000 series wireless receiver, with a G3 transmitter. Will it eat the battery up almost twice is fast?

Just so I'm following.
Can you confirm - you question has nothing to do with the receiver.  You are asking if the 2000 series transmitter has better battery life than the G3 transmitter (which are both being sent do a 2000 series receiver).

Curious about this thread because I have a 2000 series and I've debated getting an additional G3 transmitter (for back up), and I'd like to know if the G3 transmitters do in fact eat batteries faster.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Sennheiser battery load.
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2018, 12:51:02 pm »


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