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Author Topic: Rack mountable surge protectors  (Read 5825 times)

Lyn Gillean

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Rack mountable surge protectors
« on: January 23, 2018, 11:48:26 pm »

I would first like to say thank you for creating this form. There's a great amount of information.
I would like to ask what everyone is running for a rack mountable surge protector for their main equipment.
Thank you.
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2018, 12:00:29 am »

I would first like to say thank you

Please go to your profile and change the "Name" field to your real first and last name as required by the posting rules displayed in the header at the top of the section, and in the Site Rules and Suggestions in the Forum Announcements section, and on the registration page when you registered.

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Weogo Reed

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2018, 10:38:32 pm »

Hi Lyn,

SurgeX is good stuff.

Are you protecting any digital equipment
If so, a UPS is suggested so the digital pieces don't re-boot if you lose power for a short period of time.

Make sure any load and protection are reasonably matched.

Good health,  Weogo


I would first like to say thank you for creating this form. There's a great amount of information.
I would like to ask what everyone is running for a rack mountable surge protector for their main equipment.
Thank you.
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2018, 09:05:15 am »

I have Surge-X at FOH,  on the platform, and on the big screen TVs.

BTW Don't put other brands of surge protection on interconnected equipment. Many dump the surge to ground and can do more harm then good.
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Kevin Graf

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2018, 03:37:55 pm »

..............................................
BTW Don't put other brands of surge protection on interconnected equipment. Many dump the surge to ground and can do more harm then good.
Not only can they dump noise onto the Safety Ground in day-to-day operation, in the event of nearby lightning strike, each can go into protection mode at a different high voltage, creating a large voltage difference between circuits.
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Steve Litscher

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2018, 08:32:56 pm »

Follow-on question...

We just purchased a dLive system and I'd like to have a good UPS and quality surge protector in the rack along with the CDM32.

Was looking at the APC SMC1000 for a UPS but am not sure what to do in terms of a surge protector or power conditioner... I like the Furman 1800 PF C, but am not certain about its surge protection capabilities.

Thoughts? Suggestions?

« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 11:28:35 pm by Steve Litscher »
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2018, 09:11:23 pm »

Thoughts? Suggestions?

I'll admit that I'm not a huge expert on the topic (and honestly don't know at what pricepoint the generic Furman units become useful), but I use online double conversion UPS on my rigs - specifically the rackmount offerings from Eaton.  Their stock fans are a bit noisy, but otherwise they're solid units that provide true clean power.  I'm sure someone with more knowledge can fill in the gaps, but the double conversion units generally do a much better job in terms of providing consistent clean power than the line-interactive types of UPS since there's a factor of isolation between the input and the output. 
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2018, 10:26:25 pm »

Follow-on question...

We just purchased a dLive system and I'd like to have a good UPS and quality surge protector in the rack along with the CDM32.

Was looking at the APC SMC1000 for a UPS but am not sure what to do in terms of a surge protector or power conditioner... I like the Furman 1800 PF C, but am not certain about its surge protection capabilities.

Thoughts? Suggestions?

Surge = lightning.  If you're in a place where this has been a problem for your area, I seriously suggest looking at SurgeX models to protect the branch circuit(s) that power FOH/the tech world.  If you're not in a locale where lighting is a common issue you probably don't need additional surge protection beyond what is provided by the UPS.  I don't seen surge protection on touring rigs from Clair, Ratt or Clearwing.  The video guys tend to have very big UPS units but I don't recall any outboard surge protection.

You mention "power conditioner" and I can only surmise that is used after a "power shampoo."  There is NO SUCH THING if it's a passive device.  We can blame Furman for conjuring up this bullshit description 25 years ago (like Mackie and "unity" as if it were something special) and it won't go away... but if the device doesn't isolate the load neutral from the line neutral, all the harmonics that end up on your neutral will still be there.  Lather all you want, but unless you do a double conversion UPS like Jeff mentions (which is not a passive device), there ain't no such thing.

Also your URL link is broken.  You need to go back and edit the "quote" marks out of it.

As for the APC model it links to, I think it is suitable for your use; we use the Tripp-Lite equivalent "smart" UPS.  Replace the batteries every couple of years and you'll get a decade+ of service from it.
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Steve Litscher

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2018, 11:34:46 pm »

Surge = lightning.  If you're in a place where this has been a problem for your area, I seriously suggest looking at SurgeX models to protect the branch circuit(s) that power FOH/the tech world.  If you're not in a locale where lighting is a common issue you probably don't need additional surge protection beyond what is provided by the UPS.  I don't seen surge protection on touring rigs from Clair, Ratt or Clearwing.  The video guys tend to have very big UPS units but I don't recall any outboard surge protection.

You mention "power conditioner" and I can only surmise that is used after a "power shampoo."  There is NO SUCH THING if it's a passive device.  We can blame Furman for conjuring up this bullshit description 25 years ago (like Mackie and "unity" as if it were something special) and it won't go away... but if the device doesn't isolate the load neutral from the line neutral, all the harmonics that end up on your neutral will still be there.  Lather all you want, but unless you do a double conversion UPS like Jeff mentions (which is not a passive device), there ain't no such thing.

Also your URL link is broken.  You need to go back and edit the "quote" marks out of it.

As for the APC model it links to, I think it is suitable for your use; we use the Tripp-Lite equivalent "smart" UPS.  Replace the batteries every couple of years and you'll get a decade+ of service from it.

Thanks, Tim - this is incredibly helpful.

So... lighting = no issue. As most everyone else here would likely do, we will shut-down production at the first hint of an electrical storm, so it sounds like the SurgeX may not be a necessary item.

What I do worry about is surges from generators and/or dodgy local power.

Would the Eaton UPS be our best, single bet? I've also been looking into the Furman P-1800 AR (voltage regulator) with the thought that it would provide consistent 120V and hopefully that would be a "clean" 120V... I believe the 1800-AR provides regulation whereas the 1800 PF C may not.

If we went with something like the Eaton 9PX700RT in the rack, would there be any need for any other power conditioner/regulator? My only goal is to protect the CDM32 while allowing for a semi-graceful "mute" of all mains in the event of a major power issue.

There's also the SurgeX SU1000LI which is a UPS/surge protector... I wonder if that would be worth looking into?
« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 11:38:12 pm by Steve Litscher »
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Rack mountable surge protectors
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2018, 01:30:41 am »

Would the Eaton UPS be our best, single bet? I've also been looking into the Furman P-1800 AR (voltage regulator) with the thought that it would provide consistent 120V and hopefully that would be a "clean" 120V... I believe the 1800-AR provides regulation whereas the 1800 PF C may not.

If we went with something like the Eaton 9PX700RT in the rack, would there be any need for any other power conditioner/regulator? My only goal is to protect the CDM32 while allowing for a semi-graceful "mute" of all mains in the event of a major power issue.

A "double conversion" UPS works by converting the power to DC to charge the battery and power an inverter. The inverter takes its power from the converter/charger when utility power is available, and from the battery when utility power fails. Because the output of the charger, the battery, and the input of the inverter are all connected in parallel, there is no switchover time when utility power fails (because there is no switch).

The equipment connected to the UPS is clean power, immune to external power issues, because it is being created by the inverter from the DC power source (charger or battery). The cleanliness of the output power depends on the waveform. Some cheap inverters output a square wave (very undesirable); others put out a "modified sine wave" (which amounts to a coarsely stepped sine wave). The best ones will put out a clean sine wave.

As for a suitable model, I can't help you make that decision. I just wanted to make sure you understood how a double-conversion UPS works, and how it provides clean power.
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!
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