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Author Topic: Subwoofer limiting  (Read 4237 times)

duane massey

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2017, 06:22:20 pm »

What does it sound like? Can you hear anything distorting, clipping, or otherwise concerning? If not, maybe the limiter is just doing it's job and you are fine.
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Duane Massey
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Jonathan Betts

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #11 on: July 17, 2017, 06:41:52 pm »

I wouldn't worry too much unless it is constantly lit with EDM or heavy, double kick metal.
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TimHackford

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2017, 06:44:02 pm »

What does it sound like? Can you hear anything distorting, clipping, or otherwise concerning? If not, maybe the limiter is just doing it's job and you are fine,

Can't hear anything distorting or clipping sounds nice a clear to be honest i just didn't expect to be activating the limiter at a relatively low volume..I'd be able to understand more if it was ran hotter but it's not..
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Brian Jojade

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2017, 07:10:56 pm »

If you don't want to see a limit light, and have enough kick out of a sub, you're going to need far more than a 15" 1000 watt box, especially for anything outdoors. 

Flickering of the limit light is not likely to damage your sub.  It's doing its job to limit the peak that the kick is delivering.  Your overall average power is but a fraction of the hit of the kick, since that's only asking the speaker to make sound for a fraction of a second.

If you were running a bass line through the subs, and were seeing the limit light on constantly, then you can increase your overall average power and are asking for troubles.
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Bob Faulkner

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2017, 08:14:13 pm »

What you may want to try (at least to narrow down if it's a frequency thing... or something else), set the high-pass filter on your crossover a lot higher - maybe at 120 hz., and then have someone hit the kick drum, if the limit light still turns on, try the HP filter an octave higher, then repeat with the kick.  If the limit light still comes on, there could be an issue with the crossover or with how the "computer" in the sub amp interprets levels... i.e. maybe the limiter light is incorrectly set... to sensitive... (not sure how to say that - I'm not electronics engineer like many on this board are!)

Though, if it sounds good (like others have commented) it may be ok.  But, as was said, 1000 watts in a 15" sub outdoors is not really that loud.
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Paul G. OBrien

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2017, 09:13:52 pm »

There is nothing wrong with your setup or the speakers, the processing in the sub is doing exactly what it is supposed to do protecting the driver so you can safely ignore it. The only time you worry about a limiting indicator is if it is constantly lit.. solid on with little or no off duty cycle, if it's just flashing on the big hits it's telling you you are just starting to get to the limits of what the box is capable of.
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Chris Grimshaw

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2017, 03:23:02 am »

I would also try zeroing all your channel settings and listening again. There are many ways to mess up a comp + gate + EQ combination. For example, you might find you've set the gate to open too slowly, which just letting a 50Hz woof through, without the rest of the impact that goes up much higher in frequency.

Bob, I believe the problem is that the subs are limiting, not the tops. Taking the highpass would give the subs even more work to do.

Chris
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Gordon Brinton

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2017, 04:23:17 am »

Where is the ATTACK setting on your kick drum compressor? Your compressor needs to act quickly to reduce the initial transient peak, but beware, there is also desired sound within that transient peak. It should be set as short as possible, but without ruining the sound of the kick. Tweak it by ear. It can be a compromise.

I prefer to run mine near zero or 1 ms, but then I add a narrow peak on my EQ somewhere between 4K and 7K for click.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 04:26:27 am by Gordon Brinton »
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Bob Faulkner

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2017, 06:54:07 am »

I would also try zeroing all your channel settings and listening again. There are many ways to mess up a comp + gate + EQ combination. For example, you might find you've set the gate to open too slowly, which just letting a 50Hz woof through, without the rest of the impact that goes up much higher in frequency.

Bob, I believe the problem is that the subs are limiting, not the tops. Taking the highpass would give the subs even more work to do.

Chris
Yes, the problem is with the subs.  My thought was to move the high-pass (for the lows) forward, via the crossover, to the point where low frequencies would be nearly (or completely) filtered out of the signal; then after testing, if the subs still show to be "limiting", then maybe there's something wrong with the crossover (i.e. it is allowing the lower, and more, frequencies to pass through even though it was set not to).
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Mark Oakley

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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 12:06:40 pm »



In all honestly I wouldn't know if one was out if phase or not I've tried to phase switches on the back but never noticed a big difference is there a way to tell or something I would notice?

Make sure both Polarity switches on the subs are in the "0" or "Normal" position. Play some music, and stand exactly in between both subs. You should hear a decent amount of bass (summation). If there is a Polarity issue with one of the subs (or cables going to it) all the bass will disappear in the centre (cancellation).

Another trick would be to cluster both subs together in the centre in front of the stage. This would give you smoother coverage out on the dance floor and a 3 db boost for free.

-Mark
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Re: Subwoofer limiting
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 12:06:40 pm »


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