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Author Topic: Which microphone  (Read 13562 times)

Tim McCulloch

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2017, 07:27:10 pm »



Exactly.

If a sound system owner needs* these mics for vocals to be audible, there is something wrong with the system.  If a singer thinks he/she needs a Beta to "cut through" then there is something wrong on stage, either with the band's lack of ensemble playing or the monitor rig.

Beta vocal mics suck.

As Frank Zappa said "and here comes the ice pick in the forehead!"
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Geert Friedhof

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2017, 07:41:03 pm »

So, Justin,

If i were you i would get a brand spanking new SM58, if the current one has served you well all these years.

PS: I don't like the beta either.
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Scott Bolt

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2017, 08:11:23 pm »

Discontinued now but I really like my EV ND767's - Dick turned me on to these. For the money (retail) they can go up against anything else.  GC still have some stock at $49 which is silly money............wish I needed some more myself.
Another vote for the (now) silly inexpensive ND767a.  I have my whole band on them and have for over 15 years.

My thoughts on other microphones in the same market:

SM58: 

The good:  Every sound man knows how the mic works, few vocalists will complain about using them, they are forgiving on vocalists that don't know how to stay close to the mic.

The bad:  Since they have a more broad pickup than some other mics, they tend to make the system feedback earlier than some other microphones.  For the same reason, they pick up more stage noise that some other microphones.  The clarity is not as good as some other microphones, but it isn't bad either.

Sennheiser e835: More clarity than the SM58, but because of the cardioid pickup pattern, they also have lower feedback prevention than other microphones and pickup more stage noise.  I personally like these microphones a little more than the SM58, but YMMV.

OM7:  Great feedback rejection, great mic for reducing stage noise pickup, but I don't care for the sound as much as the above 2 microphones.

Beta 58:  Good clarity (better than the SM58), but as a few others have pointed out, they just seem to get that "ice pick in the ear" thing too easily for my taste.  I recently guest sang in a band where the other lead singer was using one and after only 1 week of hearing my ND767a, he replaced his Beta 58 with it.  While I don't personally care for the mic, I know lots of local lead vocalists that swear by them.

ND767a:  Warmth, clarity, and good feedback / stage noise rejection (Hyper cardioid pattern).  They sound good on male and female singers.  The only time I have ever had an issue with them was with a female vocalist that liked to pull her head way back off of the mic when she hit power notes, and was very inconsistent with her mic placement.  In this capacity, the sound is much thinner when they pull away than it is close up.  The proximity effect on the mic makes it so that you really need to stay within a reasonable distance consistency for it to sound really good consistently.  Of all the microphones that I have worked with, this one is my favorite.  They also look really cool on stage ;)
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #23 on: March 08, 2017, 08:43:36 pm »

I also like the ND367 for female singers who have a high or sharp voice.  In contrast I worked with a female alto who the 835 helped her cut through.  But a sharp soprano on that mic (or worse a Beta 58) will take your head off.  I know an Ethel Merman type who insists on using a 945 because she hears herself cutting though more.  Just don't be in the pattern of the HF horns.  8)

The presence peak on an SM58 isn't in too obnoxious a place and usually doesn't result in problems.  An inventory of those is always a good place to start.  After that you're tuning for a particular voice.
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John Ferreira

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Which microphone
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2017, 09:45:53 pm »

Exactly.

If a sound system owner needs* these mics for vocals to be audible, there is something wrong with the system.  If a singer thinks he/she needs a Beta to "cut through" then there is something wrong on stage, either with the band's lack of ensemble playing or the monitor rig.

Beta vocal mics suck.

As Frank Zappa said "and here comes the ice pick in the forehead!"

I tried the Beta 58, thinking that being a more recent mic than the SM58, it would sound better on vocals, and that Sure had done some sort of quality upgrade; it sounded bad to us compared to the SM58 and several other mics mentioned in my previous post.

I know that you can use different mics for different sounds, but for the vocals we tried, I agree, the Beta just sucks.
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John Ferreira

John Rutirasiri

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2017, 10:08:11 pm »

Did I miss where the OP said dynamics only? So far no one has mentioned the SM86, which I think is a good sounding vocal mic and a step-up from the SM58 in clarity.  Doesn't cost an arm and a leg either.

BTW, the Beta 58A is popular in the "high end" home karaoke market, where folks like the extra PSSTTTZZ and brightness.

I like it for rental inventory -- the grill doesn't come back dented like the SM58.  Just can't keep the blue Beta rubber band on though.

John R.



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Roland Clarke

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2017, 03:26:58 am »

The nd767 is in deed a bargain, seems to have a very directional pick up and consequently can go relatively loud if you are doing amateur night and trying to avoid feedback, ( great for events with withering violets having to make speeches), but sounds artificial alongside a 58.  The Beta 58 sounds just fine if your rig is good (try them on a pair of y or v series d&b audiotechnik), just roll off the bottom a little. 

I agree with the poster above who mentioned the Audix om7, I know they are very directional, but I've never liked the sound.  I worked with another engineer on a gig a few years back and his French band were sponsored with Audix vocal mic's and it just didn't sound very good.  They were all good singers so that wasn't the problem.
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Richard Penrose

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2017, 07:02:50 am »

Discontinued now but I really like my EV ND767's - Dick turned me on to these. For the money (retail) they can go up against anything else.  GC still have some stock at $49 which is silly money............wish I needed some more myself.

Wow for $49 I don't think you can go wrong! The N/D767a is a really good mic. Other mics I really like are the Audio Technica ATM710 condenser and Sennheiser E9xx series. My current dynamic mic of choice is the Telefunken M80 which go for around $150 secondhand.
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Helge A Bentsen

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2017, 09:12:50 am »

I actually disagree.  In my experience, a whole load of mic's that people think sound better, generally don't under close scrutiny.  Listening to mic's individually often will lead to preferences that don't work as well when sat in a mix.  I can think of many great liver recordings I've heard where 58's and beta 58's are used along with a whole host of studio recordings where the lead vocal was recorded on a 58.

I work with a load of vocalists from those that are truly top class to those that are rough local talent.  In my experience, I've never had a problem getting a great vocal sound with a great vocalist on a 58.  Of course using great vocal mic's like a ksm9, Neumann 104, DPA, Sennheiser, etc, may sound even better, but these are all a good deal more expensive and not necessarily suitable for all stage situations.

If you start to compare the 58 with things like the ev Debbie mentioned above (I know that it is cheaper), and other mic's like the Sennheiser 835's and Audix om5, I genuinely find that they don't work as consistently well.

The fact that top live engineers and big pa companies that can afford to have any of the above sitting around still use the 58.  It's too simplistic to blame it on industry apathy.  In my experience better options do gain traction quickly in our industry as proven by dpa's penetration in theatre sound, Behringers X32 (particularly with their previous reputation), and a few other products to boot.

YMMV

I'd rather have a high quality microphone capable of reproducing the artist and decide how it should sound in the mix than artificially limiting myself by choosing a microphone that does the coloring for me.

I don't think the SM58 is "good enough" , there is no reason to use one unless the artist request one.
I use my d:factos in any stage situation from local acts to known talent, so far no issues :)

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Corey Scogin

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Re: Which microphone
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2017, 11:04:02 am »

Did I miss where the OP said dynamics only? So far no one has mentioned the SM86, which I think is a good sounding vocal mic and a step-up from the SM58 in clarity.  Doesn't cost an arm and a leg either.

+1 to this. The SM86 is my go-to because it's not as boomy up close. Great for singers who like to eat the mic. Not bad at a distance either.

Unlike some others on this thread, I'll often use a different mic for every person on stage. I'm not usually in a scenario where everything is so close to feedback that changing the mic is a problem.

As some have mentioned, the best mic for one vocalist may not be the best for another. Picking one by listening to them solo on your voice may not be perfect but it's better than just arbitrarily picking one. Listening to them all in context is best but not everyone has time or access to that many mics.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Which microphone
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2017, 11:04:02 am »


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