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Author Topic: Building an Equipment Shop  (Read 6759 times)

Tim McCulloch

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2017, 01:06:08 pm »

Perchloroethylene in industrial settings is frequently found with related (and nastier) things like carbon tetrachloride.  One of perchlor blooms here was from a dry cleaning plant that served numerous "drop shops" (clothes were taken to the plant for cleaning and returned to the storefront where the customer dropped them off), another is from a variety of factories that turned out aviation-related goods and from a former Coleman plant that used perchlor and carbon tet as degreasers.  The City of Wichita took on the monitoring and remediation responsibilities in order for lawsuits to be dismissed (and removed from the federal Superfund list) and the area to be redeveloped into a retail/entertainment/restaurant district.
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"Practicing an art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow, for heaven's sake. Sing in the shower. Dance to the radio. Tell stories. Write a poem to a friend, even a lousy poem. Do it as well as you possible can. You will get an enormous reward. You will have created something."  - Kurt Vonnegut

Jeff Lelko

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2017, 07:52:11 pm »

A pic is worth a thousand words.

Very nice!  Thanks for sharing, and the pics show up on another computer of mine but not this one (weird).  The overhang you have is very similar to what I'd like to do with my shop on the outside as another place to store my tractor or trailer.  I really like what you've done with the upstairs too.  That's definitely beyond my needs, but it's neat to see how others make the most of their space!  Did you build with a kit or hire a company to do the entire installation?

Check these guys out for insulation.

That's interesting.  How would this compare to 4" or 6" of the standard metal building insulation, both in terms of acoustic properties and cost?

My advice is to plan your farm equipment layout first (it's the real reason to build) and then see what you have left.  How you utilize the remaining space determines how you load your van or trailer; how you store, handle and package your speakers, amps, cables, stands, etc.

I second the recommendation for a lounge/break room and, if you can swing it, a rest room (with a shower) would be nice, too.

Don't forget you'll want internet and you should consider some kind of security system/access control.

All good ideas Tim, thanks!  The nice part with my farm equipment is that most of it's on wheels, and all of it can be rearranged without too much trouble.  I guess I can say the same about my sound and light equipment too...  I get what you're saying though.  I'm definitely planning with loading a trailer in mind and what would need to move around it during the process. 

My advise is to make sure you have outlets everywhere including one outside the door in case you need to run a power tool to fix a vehicle.

I agree.  This is one of the reasons I kind of want to work in the shop a bit first using portable power just to see where I actually use it first before hiring the electrician to do the permanent drops.  As mentioned though, I'll have to plan on emptying the entire shop when the time comes.  I'm waiting to hear back on a few estimates and that'll determine how much budget I have for additional phase one activities.

Strategically placed windows to allow for good cross breeze during those typical hot Florida days.

Roof vents. The ones I have on my shop can be closed during the winter months. Make sure they have good heavy duty screens to prevent birds from entering. I have an owl problem in my shop. I have no mice but they make a mess. 

I agree about the roof vents and screens.  This property boarders a wildlife refuge, so I have everything from eagles and owls to bobcats and wild pigs roaming around.  Last week when mowing the lawn a neighboring farmer drove up to ask if I'd spotted a calf that got loose, so I imagine the occasional farm animal might pay a visit too.  The property is enclosed with appropriate livestock fencing, but I'm sure things will still find a way in. 

I do want to avoid windows though.  Not only will they be one more thing to break during a hurricane (or from my general clumsiness), but I feel they also help with security.  That, and I'll finally be able to program my lights in the middle of the day! 

Finally, I have one go-back question regarding a previous comment about heat and humidity damaging sensitive equipment...  What all is susceptible to such damage?  I thought about this previously but can't see the shop conditions being any worse than the back of a van or trailer.  All of my equipment is in proper road cases with the exception of speakers, which are just under covers.  Is there anything in particular that needs special attention? 

Thanks again!
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2017, 10:28:15 pm »

Having been an electrical contractor for several years a couple more comments come to mind.

If you decide to finish the ceiling, either wire before you sheet it or be OK with conduit on the surface below.  Typical pole buildings in this area use 8' spacing on trusses and those attics are a real pain to work in.

On receptacle spacing, there really is some method to the madness in the NEC.  In residential, receptacles are required to be installed so that no place along a wall is more than 6' from an outlet (so a 12' spacing on an uninterupted wall.)  That is to try and eliminate the need for extension cords since most things you want to plug in will have 6' cords on them.  If you did that in a 60 X 40 building, a 25' extension cord will get you to any place in the building comfortably-and anything along the wall should plug directly in.  How many circuits you divide them into depends entirely on how much stuff you plan to plug in where.
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Steve Swaffer

George Powell

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2017, 07:05:26 am »

Very nice!  Thanks for sharing, and the pics show up on another computer of mine but not this one (weird).  The overhang you have is very similar to what I'd like to do with my shop on the outside as another place to store my tractor or trailer.  I really like what you've done with the upstairs too.  That's definitely beyond my needs, but it's neat to see how others make the most of their space!  Did you build with a kit or hire a company to do the entire installation?

I first talked to a contractor to put it up and I think he came in around $140k.  Then I saw an add in our Bargain Sheet/shopper rag from an Amish builder that had a 40x60 starting around $16k.  I call them up and told them what I wanted and they worked up an estimate with the doors/windows/insulation/attic trusses/finished with metal on the inside/etc The quote was $62k!  That didn't include concrete or electrical.  I would use someone that specializes in these buildings.  Cheaper and quick.  They had it mostly finished in 9 days!   20 min after they show up the first day the had the first hole drilled.  There is nothing quite like the Amish when it comes to building barns.

I did the sewage, ditch to put it in and pex and bathroom.  Had the electrician rough everything in and put the lights up and I finished it with the outlets and switches.  I also finished the upstairs about a year later. 



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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #34 on: March 01, 2017, 11:35:50 am »

I first talked to a contractor to put it up and I think he came in around $140k.  Then I saw an add in our Bargain Sheet/shopper rag from an Amish builder that had a 40x60 starting around $16k.  I call them up and told them what I wanted and they worked up an estimate with the doors/windows/insulation/attic trusses/finished with metal on the inside/etc The quote was $62k!  That didn't include concrete or electrical....

It can be beneficial to cast your net far and wide when looking for contractors. Last summer, my brother-in-law needed to build a shop at a feedlot he manages in Wyoming (near Scottsbluff, Nebraska). A contractor he knew from the east side of SD was cheaper than any local contractors -- by far. (I don't remember the prices he was quoted.) When I was there last summer, the shop had just been built but no electric installed yet. Local electricians were quoting $60K for installing three-phase service -- just the service -- and over $20K for single phase. Three phase service (inc. the transformer bank) is already on the property, a hundred yards away from the building. He hadn't made a decision  on what to do about that at the time; I haven't asked him what the outcome was.
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #35 on: March 01, 2017, 12:31:57 pm »

how large a service (ampacity?)  Maybe I should drive to Nebraska for a week....
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Steve Swaffer

Jeff Lelko

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Re: Building an Equipment Shop
« Reply #36 on: March 01, 2017, 05:44:02 pm »

I first talked to a contractor to put it up and I think he came in around $140k.  Then I saw an add in our Bargain Sheet/shopper rag from an Amish builder that had a 40x60 starting around $16k.  I call them up and told them what I wanted and they worked up an estimate with the doors/windows/insulation/attic trusses/finished with metal on the inside/etc The quote was $62k!  That didn't include concrete or electrical.  I would use someone that specializes in these buildings.  Cheaper and quick.  They had it mostly finished in 9 days!   20 min after they show up the first day the had the first hole drilled.  There is nothing quite like the Amish when it comes to building barns.

I did the sewage, ditch to put it in and pex and bathroom.  Had the electrician rough everything in and put the lights up and I finished it with the outlets and switches.  I also finished the upstairs about a year later. 

Thanks for the details.  Right now my quotes are shaping up right around 20-25k for the building itself, another 12-15k for the foundation, and about the same for labor.  I'm still working specifics and options, but so far everything seems pretty reasonable.  This doesn't include utilities or insulation yet though.  I know I need to get the rough ins done when pouring the foundation. 

The electrical is still the big question mark.  I've been working with the local electric company but haven't gotten a number yet.
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