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Author Topic: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware  (Read 5053 times)

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2017, 12:27:55 pm »

My recent experience with UL was very expensive for the possible value returned (because I was going where nobody had gone before.)

Where UL shines is with these common appliances or fixtures.

Lack of UL marking is not only a comment on the design, but the factory discipline (or not) that assembled the product. Finding both questionable, it seems that fixture should end up in a land fill...

JR
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2017, 03:11:13 pm »

Our experience with "almost direct from China" lighting is this: if you order a sample there's an 80% chance your eventual order will not match the sample, either in some physical way that affects usability, or in the match of the LEDs.

If anyone decides to order some, order 25% more than you need because a re-order is 100% certain to NOT match.  There will be no parts availability, either.  When you finally burn through enough units you can sell the remainder off to local bands or donate them to your favorite community theater group (who will eventually hate you for it).

We consider them expendables.

Where the money goes with even the lower priced brands like Chauvet, AMDJ, or Blizzard is that those folks have an engineer or 2 in China, holding the factory accountable for the quality of what is shipped, to insure there are no unauthorized parts substitutions, and to help with service parts.....

The smile of cheap price fades faster than an LED can with a blown PSU...
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Jeff Lelko

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2017, 06:03:02 pm »

Our experience with "almost direct from China" lighting is this...

When you say "almost direct from China", are you talking about brands like Artfox that supposedly have American distribution centers, or the ebay listings that claim to ship from a US warehouse?  I agree with you though that the price difference between the ebay LED Pars and the lower end of ADJ/Chauvet/Blizzard is small enough to justify the added cost of the name brand purchase, especially when reliability is important and that you want the fixtures to stay in inventory for a while.  I'm tempted to try an order of the Sharpy knock-offs, more as an experiment than anything else...
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2017, 10:31:34 am »

If not UL approved, I wouldn't use these...

JR
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David Allred

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2017, 01:21:39 pm »

If not UL approved, I wouldn't use these...

JR

They may be as "UL Approved"  ::) as any of the other no brand Chinese lights.  With or without a sticker.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2017, 01:42:20 pm »

They may be as "UL Approved"  ::) as any of the other no brand Chinese lights.  With or without a sticker.
The sticker is supposed to be evidence that UL both tested and approved the design, and periodically visits the factory to confirm that the units are built to approved plan.

It is possible to copy a UL approved design and still get it wrong. The tear down recap suggests it may not even be a good copy.

I've had more than a little exposure to human safety factors in product design, and while UL can be a little pedantic, they serve a valid purpose.

Of course do whatever floats your boat, I just said what I would do.

JR
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David Allred

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2017, 07:35:48 am »

The sticker is supposed to be evidence that UL both tested and approved the design, and periodically visits the factory to confirm that the units are built to approved plan.

It is possible to copy a UL approved design and still get it wrong. The tear down recap suggests it may not even be a good copy.

I've had more than a little exposure to human safety factors in product design, and while UL can be a little pedantic, they serve a valid purpose.

Of course do whatever floats your boat, I just said what I would do.

JR

I was saying that a Chinese cloner plant can easily print their own "UL" stickers.  Like they can print their own "Shure" logos on a fake 58.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2017, 10:12:59 am »

I was saying that a Chinese cloner plant can easily print their own "UL" stickers.  Like they can print their own "Shure" logos on a fake 58.
It's not that easy by design, but attempts to fake UL approval raises the level of fraud.

JR

PS: One very old trick was to put a UL approved line cord on a non-UL appliance. The UL sticker on the line cord does not mean the entire product is kosher.
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Re: Cheap lights from China: buyer beware
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2017, 10:12:59 am »


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