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Author Topic: Receptacle Cover Plates  (Read 14190 times)

Frank DeWitt

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2017, 11:36:30 pm »

I read a bit of it.  Someone pointed out that "No one makes a audiophile outlet BOX yet"

I,m thinking polymer concrete is the way to go with stainless steel threaded inserts for the outlet.
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Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2017, 01:23:20 am »

I read a bit of it.  Someone pointed out that "No one makes a audiophile outlet BOX yet"

I,m thinking polymer concrete is the way to go with stainless steel threaded inserts for the outlet.

What is this "stainless steel" insert nonsense?  Silly boy!  You hear less noise and get cleaner power if the inserts are Ti (titanium).
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2017, 01:27:45 am »

I read a bit of it.  Someone pointed out that "No one makes a audiophile outlet BOX yet"

I,m thinking polymer concrete is the way to go with stainless steel threaded inserts for the outlet.

While we're on the subject, I was wondering if you'd be interested in some audiophile-quality soil to drive your ground rod into?
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2017, 07:28:46 am »

While we're on the subject, I was wondering if you'd be interested in some audiophile-quality soil to drive your ground rod into?

Well, when I worked at a facility with an isolated grounding system in a pit we had to add electrolytes (essentially salt water) every month and test the ground rod impedance. It wouldn't be a big stretch to sell these audiophiles a special electrolyte solution made with water from an underground spring that included "happy ions" or whatever.  Audio Aide?
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Kevin Graf

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2017, 09:17:18 am »

There is one pro-audio/audiophile AC power system contractor/provider that is very big on installing chemical grounding systems.
Ad if the grounding system had anything to do with day-to-day AC power quality.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2017, 12:32:03 pm »

Well, when I worked at a facility with an isolated grounding system in a pit we had to add electrolytes (essentially salt water) every month and test the ground rod impedance. It wouldn't be a big stretch to sell these audiophiles a special electrolyte solution made with water from an underground spring that included "happy ions" or whatever.  Audio Aide?

The ground rod for the electric fence on my brother's farm is inside the barn, 10 feet from the outside wall. A few times a year he dumps a bucket of water on the soil around it. I don't think he adds any salt. Maybe he should?
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2017, 12:34:07 pm »

No wonder we didn't hear a difference in the expensive audiophile receptacle cover plates, we weren't torquing them correctly!

Well, I suppose the screw could work loose from vibration from the audio. Then the cover plate might start vibrating and color the sound. So you definitely want to torque them tight enough so they don't vibrate loose!

But make sure you use an audiophile-quality torque wrench.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2017, 03:21:47 pm »

The ground rod for the electric fence on my brother's farm is inside the barn, 10 feet from the outside wall. A few times a year he dumps a bucket of water on the soil around it. I don't think he adds any salt. Maybe he should?

You just need to pee on the ground around the ground rod. It's got all the electrolytes you need.  ;D
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frank kayser

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2017, 07:59:46 pm »

You just need to pee on the ground around the ground rod. It's got all the electrolytes you need.  ;D
New use for "barn cats".
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2017, 08:10:51 pm »

You just need to pee on the ground around the ground rod. It's got all the electrolytes you need.  ;D
New use for "barn cats".

They'll only do that once.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Receptacle Cover Plates
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2017, 08:10:51 pm »


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