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Author Topic: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas  (Read 2039 times)

Michael T Casey

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Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« on: January 28, 2017, 08:22:29 pm »

Hello all,

I've got an array of antennas for Shure UHF mics and BTR800 installed in a baseball stadium.  RF performance is fine, but currently there are a couple active Shure LPDAs for the mics, and Telex LPDAs for the comms that aren't holding up to the rain and sun, and I'm also concerned about the wind load. 

I've been looking at the Lectrosonics skeletal shark fins as a replacement.  Any thoughts on how they would fare in a fixed outdoor install? 

Also, it looks like the ALP620 is the passive version?  Would that be acceptable for the BTR800 Tx?
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Henry Cohen

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Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2017, 08:51:51 pm »

Hello all,

I've got an array of antennas for Shure UHF mics and BTR800 installed in a baseball stadium.  RF performance is fine, but currently there are a couple active Shure LPDAs for the mics, and Telex LPDAs for the comms that aren't holding up to the rain and sun, and I'm also concerned about the wind load. 

I've been looking at the Lectrosonics skeletal shark fins as a replacement.  Any thoughts on how they would fare in a fixed outdoor install? 

Also, it looks like the ALP620 is the passive version?  Would that be acceptable for the BTR800 Tx?

Yes, the passive ALP620 is the correct antenna to use for transmit applications, as well as receive unless a preamp is required for significantly long coax runs (though you'd be better off moving to a larger, lower loss coax).

The Lectro ALP6 skeletal series are a terrific outdoor antenna; I have several in outdoor installations a number of years old with no problems. The key factor will be to properly weatherize the BNC connection: Ensuring the entire area is dry and clean, use electrical tape around the BNC connection, up the connector housing as best as possible, and down the coax about 2" past the ferrule. Then encase the taped area with mastic pad or tape and then hand work to meld the mastic material. Finally, spray the entire antenna with a silicone spray to minimize capillary water action and thus ice build up.

Given the new crop of rubberized spray coatings on the market, that maybe an easier application than the mastic material and just as effective.
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Henry Cohen

CP Communications    www.cpcomms.com
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2017, 06:50:56 am »

Yes, the passive ALP620 is the correct antenna to use for transmit applications, as well as receive unless a preamp is required for significantly long coax runs (though you'd be better off moving to a larger, lower loss coax).

The Lectro ALP6 skeletal series are a terrific outdoor antenna; I have several in outdoor installations a number of years old with no problems. The key factor will be to properly weatherize the BNC connection: Ensuring the entire area is dry and clean, use electrical tape around the BNC connection, up the connector housing as best as possible, and down the coax about 2" past the ferrule. Then encase the taped area with mastic pad or tape and then hand work to meld the mastic material. Finally, spray the entire antenna with a silicone spray to minimize capillary water action and thus ice build up.

Given the new crop of rubberized spray coatings on the market, that maybe an easier application than the mastic material and just as effective.
For waterproofing the connector, there is heat shrink available that has glue inside.
As you heat it up, the glue melts and forms a very good seal.

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Daniel Levi

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Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2017, 07:20:57 am »

another tip for waterproofing is to wrap the connection in silicon self fusing tape, that is what is used for terrestrial antenna installs in the uk.
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Henry Cohen

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Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2017, 12:42:52 pm »

For waterproofing the connector, there is heat shrink available that has glue inside.
As you heat it up, the glue melts and forms a very good seal.

Encapsulating shrink will not cover the connector housing of the Lectro antennas. But even if referring to an open connector design as on the Sennheiser and Shure antennas for example, mastic pads/tape, or the silicon based versions of the same, can provide full coverage over the entire connector assembly and mounting regardless of shape.
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Henry Cohen

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Michael T Casey

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Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2017, 01:53:42 pm »

Awesome, thanks for the advice!
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Outdoor Installation UHF Antennas
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2017, 01:53:42 pm »


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