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Author Topic: When did receptacles become outlets?  (Read 7291 times)

Tim McCulloch

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #30 on: December 28, 2016, 03:19:59 pm »

My definition -- which may not be your definition -- of jalousie is an operable louvered window, where the panes of glass open and close much like the louvers in a shutter or heater vent. Mr. Kerby's definition appears to also apply to the light-blocking louvers placed over the windows.

Or, as my sister called them when she lived in an old trailer house: "jalopy" windows, due to their notorious draftiness.

It's a floor polish! No, it's a desert topping!

I'm familiar with both jalousies and transoms as both were common in Southern California but from my childhood experience it seemed like Steve was using them interchangeably.  I have seen a jalousie-style transom, too, so that kind of paved the way for my post...

Carry on with outlets and receptacles!
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Steve M Smith

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2016, 05:15:12 pm »

Which may be behind the Hawaiian pidgin vernacular to "close the lights".
My grandmother used to say "out the light" meaning to turn it off.  I think that was originally used for putting out candles.


Steve.
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2016, 05:54:31 pm »

My definition -- which may not be your definition -- of jalousie is an operable louvered window, where the panes of glass open and close much like the louvers in a shutter or heater vent. Mr. Kerby's definition appears to also apply to the light-blocking louvers placed over the windows.

Or, as my sister called them when she lived in an old trailer house: "jalopy" windows, due to their notorious draftiness.
Jalousie is the proper term but we always called them louvers.  Given the weather in Hawaii, it was basically a matter of light and airflow.  Most of the houses have louver windows (easy for the kids to sneak in and out at night  ;) ) and you open them to the degree you want outside air.  Usually a combination of wood on the bottom and glass up higher.  The ones in the classrooms were usually all wood.  Sometimes a few glass ones up top so there was always some light.  With a screen outside of the louvers, you just turned them to the compromise of light and fresh air you wanted.  Usually pretty much wide open except for movie time.
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Jerome Malsack

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2016, 08:05:17 am »

Same with the navy statement  The Smoking Lamp is out.   This applied to smoking cig's, Welding, Cutting, or burning of trash.   So still in use and tradition. 
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2016, 12:35:34 pm »

Which may be behind the Hawaiian pidgin vernacular to "close the lights".  As in "Eh brah, try close the lights".  Meaning to turn them off.  When I was a kid I thought it was derived from the use of wooden jalousies on the windows of most schoolrooms.  Before we could watch a movie, we had to "close the lights".  Which meant both turning off the electric lights, and closing the jalousies.

I have a customer that seems pretty simple minded (not derogatory-just truthful-I have a great deal of respect for him as he runs a farming operation and owns much more land than I d, he appears to be making a comfortable living).  Not sure he has ever been far from home, but he threw me the first time he used the terms "open" and "closed" to refer to his outside security light being "on" or "off" respectively. I've wondered for some time where the terms came from.
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2016, 04:51:14 pm »

In Spanish: ciera la luz.  Literally close the light.
Also, in Spain the first floor is not the ground floor, but the next one up.
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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2016, 04:51:14 pm »


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