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Author Topic: When did receptacles become outlets?  (Read 7274 times)

Kevin Graf

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2016, 11:10:34 am »

So I think you are saying that there is a receptacle behind the Ice Box and the Davenport but a outlet behind the Frig and the Couch.
I'm old enough to remember the Ice Box and the Ice Man.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #21 on: December 24, 2016, 11:42:41 am »

They are called sockets over here.


Steve.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2016, 02:20:12 pm »

They are called sockets over here.


Steve.

Allen & Heath consoles have "sockets" rather than XLR jacks....
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2016, 03:29:57 pm »

Allen & Heath consoles have "sockets" rather than XLR jacks....

A fun (And necessary) page in the Haynes auto manuals is the English American translation page.
http://totalcarmagazine.com/features/2013/11/17/words_don_t_come_easy/
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David Buckley

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #24 on: December 25, 2016, 04:26:13 pm »

I read that in Ireland it is also a socket.

That thing is called a socket everywhere in the world except those countries that have adopted the NEC in  whole or in part.  Murica - you're out of step :) 
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2016, 06:10:41 pm »

It's kind of the same reason we "turn on" the lights, even though the switches we use don't actually turn. Back in the days of gas lighting, you had to turn a valve handle to release the gas so you could light the lamp. (And, perhaps, the same reason the term "light" applies to "lamps": from the action of lighting them.) The oldest lighting fixtures ("luminaires") were equipped with rotary switches, because that was the style of interface users of gas lamps were used to.
Which may be behind the Hawaiian pidgin vernacular to "close the lights".  As in "Eh brah, try close the lights".  Meaning to turn them off.  When I was a kid I thought it was derived from the use of wooden jalousies on the windows of most schoolrooms.  Before we could watch a movie, we had to "close the lights".  Which meant both turning off the electric lights, and closing the jalousies.
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Jerome Malsack

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2016, 08:44:45 am »

"Cap" or "cord cap". Do I get a prize?

I see Cap or cord cap as a child protective device to stick in an outlet. 

and the consumer phrase, Plug this into the wall ?
 
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2016, 11:30:12 am »

Which may be behind the Hawaiian pidgin vernacular to "close the lights".  As in "Eh brah, try close the lights".  Meaning to turn them off.  When I was a kid I thought it was derived from the use of wooden jalousies on the windows of most schoolrooms.  Before we could watch a movie, we had to "close the lights".  Which meant both turning off the electric lights, and closing the jalousies.

So can a jalousie be a transom?  Is a transom a jalousie?

I grew up (mostly) in Los Angeles, and our schools had double hung windows on the exterior and transoms over every classroom door.  It was possible to get decent ventilation except on the days when there was a Level 3 SigAlert (smog).  We couldn't go outside for PE and the teachers were supposed to keep the exterior windows closed.  Hot, stuffy boxes for classrooms...
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Frank Koenig

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2016, 01:12:05 pm »

Which may be behind the Hawaiian pidgin vernacular to "close the lights".  As in "Eh brah, try close the lights".  Meaning to turn them off.

My friend from the Philippines says the same thing, which amuses me as "closing" the circuit "turns on" the lights. He also insists on calling seats, as in cars, airplanes, theaters, "chairs", and the floor, as in a building, "ground". Isn't language wonderful? I just wish it weren't so damn hard (for me). -F
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2016, 03:15:30 pm »

So can a jalousie be a transom?  Is a transom a jalousie?

My definition -- which may not be your definition -- of jalousie is an operable louvered window, where the panes of glass open and close much like the louvers in a shutter or heater vent. Mr. Kirby's definition appears to also apply to the light-blocking louvers placed over the windows.

Or, as my sister called them when she lived in an old trailer house: "jalopy" windows, due to their notorious draftiness.

EDIT: Apologies to Mr. Kirby for misspelling his name in a prior draft.

« Last Edit: December 29, 2016, 01:50:30 am by Jonathan Johnson »
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Re: When did receptacles become outlets?
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2016, 03:15:30 pm »


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