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Author Topic: Black Light Sun  (Read 8931 times)

Mike Sokol

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #30 on: December 31, 2016, 03:15:28 pm »

Actually I think it was a single transistor but could be wrong.

You are correct, just a single transistor. Pretty simple circuit....
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Kevin Maxwell

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2016, 03:31:13 pm »

I assembled the poster and mounted it on the wall while listening to In A Gadda Da Vida. Seemed like the right thing to do. I wonder how much UV exposure is TOO much?

Arenít those black lights supposed to be mounted so you arenít staring at the bulbs? Or at least put something on the front so they are just lighting up the poster and not the whole room. Are the tubes white or dark when they are off? I remember at one time being told that one had a filter in them and was ok to look at the other didnít and was bad to look at. 
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2016, 03:35:54 pm »

Arenít those black lights supposed to be mounted so you arenít staring at the bulbs? Or at least put something on the front so they are just lighting up the poster and not the whole room. Are the tubes white or dark when they are off? I remember at one time being told that one had a filter in them and was ok to look at the other didnít and was bad to look at.

I mounted them exactly as in the instructions. And they look black when turned off, so I assume there a filter involved. However, it would be simple to make a little plastic shield in front of them to block direct exposure.
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Mike Sokol
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2016, 04:19:11 pm »

You are correct, just a single transistor. Pretty simple circuit....
I also seem to remember (it has been a few years------) that it was just point to point wiring-no circuit board.
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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2016, 09:04:58 pm »

Yep, the LPB1 was just a single transistor hanging in the air in a small rats nest of parts.  No where near as sophisticated as the 741 things Craig Anderton put in Electronic Musician.  Just a simple gain boost that would help overdrive the front end of an amplifier.

They made them in both genders, as it were.  You could get ones that plugged into the amp like mine (which still works) or that plugged into the guitar like Mike's pic.  Which seemed more in the way to me.  When I finally got a wah pedal, I found that putting the boost in front of it helped exaggerate the effect a bit.  At least until I moved from the Univox thing I had to a real (made in Italy) Vox (which I still have).

Gain into overdrive leads to compression which usually makes the guitar easier to play.  At least it's more forgiving.  Until the Klon Centaur and folks cloning Dumbles, substantial compression came with any amount of distortion.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2016, 10:41:29 pm »

You are correct, just a single transistor. Pretty simple circuit....

Man oh man that's a lot of feedback for one little transistor.

Wouldn't it just saturate and make square waves? 
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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2016, 11:36:18 pm »

You are correct, just a single transistor. Pretty simple circuit....
Ironic perhaps but the 2n5088 was called a low noise transistor back then... by the 70's we had transistors that were really low noise.

Seems like just decades ago.... 8)

JR
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Black Light Sun
« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2017, 01:41:18 am »

I mounted them exactly as in the instructions. And they look black when turned off, so I assume there a filter involved. However, it would be simple to make a little plastic shield in front of them to block direct exposure.

If there's nothing between the tube and your eyes, then your eyes aren't protected from UV.

Think about it: if the tube had a built-in filter that blocked UV, then the poster wouldn't glow.

Stare too long at an unshielded blacklight tube, and you'll notice that your eyes start hurting, even though it doesn't seem like there's that much visible light coming from it. Your eyes are sensitive to spectra that you can't see.

My understanding is that the black color is an enamel coating that blocks out most of the visible spectrum -- essentially, a  UV band-pass filter.
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Re: Black Light Sun
¬ę Reply #37 on: January 01, 2017, 01:41:18 am ¬Ľ


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