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Author Topic: Twisted pair audio cable.  (Read 1912 times)

Rob Fowler

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Twisted pair audio cable.
« on: August 31, 2016, 04:29:16 PM »

Hi everyone new poster here.

I have a quick question about twisted pair installation microphone cable.

When terminating a single FST type cable as a balanced line on XLR connectors, with a white and a blue conductor, what if any is the conventional connection?

What I mean is would it be normal to use blue as hot (pin 2) and white as cold (pin 3) or vice versa?

Thanks very much to anyone who can help!

Rob.
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2016, 04:30:42 PM »


Thanks very much to anyone who can help!

Rob.

Please go to your profile and change the "Name" field to your real first and last name as required by the posting rules displayed in the header at the top of the section, and in the Site Rules and Suggestions in the Forum Announcements section, and on the registration page when you registered.

Mac
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Mac Kerr

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Re: Twisted pair audio cable.
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2016, 03:33:01 PM »

Hi everyone new poster here.

I have a quick question about twisted pair installation microphone cable.

When terminating a single FST type cable as a balanced line on XLR connectors, with a white and a blue conductor, what if any is the conventional connection?

What I mean is would it be normal to use blue as hot (pin 2) and white as cold (pin 3) or vice versa?

Here in the US the color pair is generally black and white. Most of the commercially built cables I've seen are wired with black on in 2 and white on 3. This sort of follows the US electrical colors where black, red, and blue are the hot conductors and white is the neutral. AFAIK there is no official "standard" of which color is used where, but building your own to match whatever the local supply has standardized on makes sense. It is a PITA when you have to open both ends of the cable in order to rewire one because you don't know the standard that was used on that cable.

The cables that Shure used to supply with their mics were wired white on 2 black on 3, but most I've seen are GBW.

Mac
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Twisted pair audio cable.
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2016, 05:13:45 PM »

I always like to have the lighter color as the + or Hot.

Others feel differently.

The important thing is to make sure it is the same on both ends.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Twisted pair audio cable.
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2016, 05:38:40 PM »

I am not aware of any color code standard for audio twisted pair.

Problems can arise when we make assumptions about what others have done when only working with  one end.

JR   
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Re: Twisted pair audio cable.
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2016, 05:38:40 PM »


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