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Author Topic: A-V graphics standards?  (Read 1304 times)

Craig Hauber

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A-V graphics standards?
« on: September 27, 2016, 04:46:39 pm »

Is there a guide to industry standards for AV drafting?
like standardized sheets, what goes on each sheet, order of sheets and what is actually expected to be drawn out vs just having a schedule list- table etc...

I've seen quite a few examples but they are all different enough that it's difficult to determine what's a standard as opposed to unskilled draftsmanship.

Any readers on this board who run a drafting dept for an AV company?  Or is it just treated like a necessary evil that gets in the way of the actual fun part of  installing sound systems? :)
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Craig Hauber
Mondak Sound Design
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Robert Healey

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Re: A-V graphics standards?
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2016, 10:48:24 am »

Is there a guide to industry standards for AV drafting?
like standardized sheets, what goes on each sheet, order of sheets and what is actually expected to be drawn out vs just having a schedule list- table etc...

I've seen quite a few examples but they are all different enough that it's difficult to determine what's a standard as opposed to unskilled draftsmanship.

Any readers on this board who run a drafting dept for an AV company?  Or is it just treated like a necessary evil that gets in the way of the actual fun part of  installing sound systems? :)

There are plenty of standards out there, including INFOCOMM. In practice, these are rarely followed.  I see a lot of shop drawings from different contractors and each company has its own standard. If you are creating your own, I would start with the US National CAD Standard and modify it from there to meet your needs. That will also give you a leg up on government jobs - the GSA often references the National CAD Standard in its requirements.

When deciding what to include in your drawings, you need to think about your audience. Are these bid spec drawings? If they are they should follow a company standard and be clear and detailed enough for a contractor to create accurate bids. Is there an architect involved? If there is, you should follow the architect's sheet size, numbering, and naming convention. Are the drawings just for your techs to build the thing, and do you trust them to make reasonable inferences about how the system should be installed? Maybe markups of 11x17 PDFs would be fine rather than CADing the whole system at that point. It will cut down quite a bit on your drawing time.

Side note: If you are creating shop drawings for a consultant, it is wise to match the order of the consultant's drawings. It makes the review process quite a bit easier.
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