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Author Topic: Power supply or device fault?  (Read 3459 times)

David Allred

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Re: Power supply or device fault?
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2016, 09:30:39 am »


It sounds like you (David) are familiar with SMPS, but for anybody else, you have to be really careful with these things, since parts are connected directly to the line voltage, and there is a slight chance that a capacitor could stay charged at 170V, even after power has been removed for a while.

GTD

No, but I enjoy learning about things and how they work (and are repaired).  This particular PS is very compact internally.  For example, the cap I suspect, is a 5/8 dia x 100 long with both lead on one end.  It is mounted 90 deg to the board (leads bent 90 deg and the side is flush to the PCB).  The cap ends are sandwiched between two heatsink(?) plate/bars with only enough clearance to not touch the leads.
Self repair is looking more difficult and time consuming than I wanted, just to save $50.
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duane massey

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Re: Power supply or device fault?
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2016, 01:03:12 am »

Yep, it's a trade-off. For me, repairing a sealed PS when I can replace it for less than $50 is an easy choice,especially if it's for a client. The labor invested in repairing the old one, especially if if proves to not fix the problem, is not in the client's best interest. If it's your own gear, might be worth the trouble, but I'd still just buy a new part and move on.
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Duane Massey
Technician, musician, stubborn old guy
Houston, Texas

Steve M Smith

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Re: Power supply or device fault?
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2016, 04:54:24 am »

It sounds like you (David) are familiar with SMPS, but for anybody else, you have to be really careful with these things, since parts are connected directly to the line voltage, and there is a slight chance that a capacitor could stay charged at 170V, even after power has been removed for a while.

It could be twice that.  Most equipment is designed to be dual voltage.  100/230v.  A single link can convert an ordinary bridge rectifier into a voltage doubler.  It is in place for one voltage and removed for the other so something running on 110v could have twice the RMS voltage on its power supply.


Steve.
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Re: Power supply or device fault?
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2016, 04:54:24 am »


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