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Author Topic: Loud Guitar Amps  (Read 20617 times)

David Scoville

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #80 on: April 20, 2016, 03:11:29 pm »

 8)
   Congratulations !!!
    This has got to be a contender for one of the most highly swayed/swerved threads ever!
    That said there are lots of valid points made here from all sides of the question at hand.
   I do find though that some who maybe cross lines by discounting to downright berating others experiences and ideas remember the differences between acrylic shielding and glass houses  ;)
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Scott Olewiler

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #81 on: April 20, 2016, 04:23:26 pm »

My gig last Saturday. Shriners ball. Lots of older folks. We furnished all backline.  The band was very good, not loud at all. Big harmony vocals. Fun to work with. Mix of country, swing and classic rock.

That '65 Fender Super Reverb on stage sounded very good, even at low volume. Drummer was in the pocket and under control. Bass was perfect.  NO issues. Real Pros.

So...it can be done.

Jamin,

That has got to be one of the cleanest stages I've ever seen.  Doesn't even look like you have enough cables.
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We're here to deliver the sound equipment. Who has the check?

Stephen Kirby

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #82 on: April 20, 2016, 11:59:46 pm »

Stephen - i know where I'm going in 2 weeks when I'm back up in San Mateo - there's a TAP plastics right there in town. On yours, is the clear tape flexible enough to fold on itself?

Also Bob and Stephen - with the plexi shield, does that work only if you have monitors for the rest of the band, or is there still enough guitar for the rest of the band? We have some guest members for whom this could be great.  And yes Stephen, agree that there is a leap from playing at home to playing in a band - you've got to become a better listener, and in some cases that means turning down so you can hear what others are doing.

As for heroes, yep, I love the sound of Pete's 60's - 80's live Hiwatt rig, but today that isn't a bar rig, club rig, or even a county fair rig now. Surprisingly (maybe because of tinnitus), his current onstage amps aren't that loud - look at the volume settings down the page:
http://www.thewho.net/whotabs/gear/guitar/fendervibroking.html
Ned, on the tape hinge; I put it across on one side and then folded the two pieces flat and put another piece on the other side, which when I opened it up I pushed into the gap so that the hinge is on the same plane as the other side.  Hope that makes sense.
For extreme volume you have to put it fairly close to the cab to knock it down.  If the level is moderate then it can be further away and the sound spreads more.  Other folks on a quiet stage will definitely hear.  It doesn't drop the level as much as it just keeps it from killing the front row.  And if the cab is open in back the stage will get that.
I did a gig at the Kuumbwa Jazz Center in Santa Cruz with an acoustic piano, horns and a good jazz drummer with light hands.  I was stuck standing almost on top of my amp behind the horns.  I could hear myself as if I was 20' in front of it and the soundperson came up at sound check and put a mic in front of it.  This was a 100W Fuchs ODS with a 1-12 oval open back cab with a 103dB efficient speaker.  In other words, capable of making some noise.  I operate on the premiss that when comping if I can hear myself clearly, it's too loud.  But when soloing, it should be the dominant voice and I shouldn't have to beat the instrument to hear myself.  I want to be able to put dynamic expression into a solo which means not every note is at the same level.  So some headroom is needed.  The other part of playing this way is that it's not a constant stream of noise either.
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #83 on: April 22, 2016, 02:08:03 am »

I don't need to come over to your house. I've seen more than my share of ham fisted drummers in the past 50+ years, but luckily for me I was the guy making the final choices and none of them ever made it past the auditions. Every time I see a ham fisted drummer I'm reminded of a tin wind up monkey and it's drum. One speed, no touch, feel or emotion conveyed through their instrument. Just the same sound at the same volume every time you wind it up.
I'm not a ham fisted drummer. You are wrong about me and your ego is os HUGE that your meekness has been swallowed up by it. You are closed minded and I dont give hoot who you are or how long you have been doing sound nobody knows it all and I can PROVE what I posted, yes I can PROVE it and you cannot officially disprove something you have not investigated. I also have MANY musicians that will tell you I play with feel and emotion, I'm not super fast or a basher. Btw I play Paiste 2002 cymbals that most people break, I never broke one, that outta tell you something. Maybe you have ham lobed ears.
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #84 on: April 22, 2016, 02:15:13 am »

Great tone played at the wrong volume....is still the wrong volume
Thats true !
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #85 on: April 22, 2016, 02:31:33 am »

Bars/small clubs providing e-drums and small guitar amps to counter musician inability to play at appropriate levels reminds me of churches resorting to shields/enclosures for drummers who play too loud.  It's a Band-Aid that doesn't address the actual problem.
It will solve the problem. Are you willing to teach all the drummers you encounter how to play softer ? All the churches I was ever in that had drums had an electronic drum set.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #86 on: April 22, 2016, 06:46:17 am »

I'm not a ham fisted drummer. You are wrong about me and your ego is os HUGE that your meekness has been swallowed up by it. You are closed minded and I dont give hoot who you are or how long you have been doing sound nobody knows it all and I can PROVE what I posted, yes I can PROVE it and you cannot officially disprove something you have not investigated. I also have MANY musicians that will tell you I play with feel and emotion, I'm not super fast or a basher. Btw I play Paiste 2002 cymbals that most people break, I never broke one, that outta tell you something. Maybe you have ham lobed ears.


You've said over and over you have to play/hit drums hard for them to sound good. How's that work out for you playing a song like "Misty" or "Dark end of the street". I have no ego Jeff, and that's what's help through all these years. All those people who have given constructive criticism, and me listening to them. Playing drums hard all the time for the purpose of supposed tone is the equal to setting an amp on 10 in every club or venue played. No feel, no touch, just a crutch. 
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BOSTON STRONG........
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I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Jay Barracato

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #87 on: April 22, 2016, 07:34:08 am »


You've said over and over you have to play/hit drums hard for them to sound good. How's that work out for you playing a song like "Misty" or "Dark end of the street". I have no ego Jeff, and that's what's help through all these years. All those people who have given constructive criticism, and me listening to them. Playing drums hard all the time for the purpose of supposed tone is the equal to setting an amp on 10 in every club or venue played. No feel, no touch, just a crutch.

Submitted without comment

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-X4o8Sht5Ww

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9dY6FM9mVM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiXLIwr7xxg

Ok I will comment. I have a recording of Dom on one of my computers that has a 30 db swell in it. A 30db change in dynamics just through stick control.
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Jay Barracato

Jamin Lynch

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #88 on: April 22, 2016, 08:55:43 am »

I find it a bit ironic that the most of the guitar amps mentioned here are older amps that the "older guys" have been getting good tone out of at lower volumes for decades.

It seems these days the "young kids" can't to get good tone from those same amps unless cranked up.

What changed?  ::)
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"At first you don't succeed, go back to the drawing board."

Josh Millward

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Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #89 on: April 22, 2016, 10:12:17 am »

I find it a bit ironic that the most of the guitar amps mentioned here are older amps that the "older guys" have been getting good tone out of at lower volumes for decades.

It seems these days the "young kids" can't to get good tone from those same amps unless cranked up.

What changed?  ::)

Chops.

The old guys got it, the young guys don't.

Keep working on it, young guys. You'll get there eventually. ;-)

To that end, it is also worth noting that the Reaper has also recently claimed guitar greats Bob Saxton and Lonnie Mack.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2016, 12:32:17 pm by Josh Millward »
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Josh Millward
Danley Sound Labs

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Loud Guitar Amps
« Reply #89 on: April 22, 2016, 10:12:17 am »


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