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Author Topic: 3 vocal mics????  (Read 9560 times)

Curt Sorensen

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2016, 03:08:50 pm »

Hi,
I can only speculate, but I think Bob has the answer. The article mentions separate recordings for broadcast and album release. The upper mic is a standard broadcast vocal mic of the era, the lower looks like a typical add-on (for the time) for recording, but unidentifiable, and the PA(?) mic might be an RE15? I think three different uses begets three mics. Pre-Dante by a more than a little, probably pre split systems as well.
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Curt Sorensen
Madison, Wisconsin

Doug.Jane

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2016, 05:29:39 pm »

Splits were very dodgy in those days, it was very common to do the multimike thing.
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Art Welter

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2016, 06:41:01 pm »

Thanks Bob-but that accounts for TWO mics-live and recording.

I wonder about the THIRD one????????????
Live, multi track recording and 16mm film.

There were lawsuits later when Steve Gold and Jerry Goldstein refused to let former partner Michael Jeffery use anything recorded at the 1969 Royal Albert Hall- he possessed tapes, but Gold and Goldstein had the film, and claimed visual rights.

The multi-million dollar lawsuit was partially resolved in an out of court settlement in 1979, then re-ignited after RAH material was included on the 1982 "Jimi Hendrix Concerts" album.

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Ivan Beaver

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2016, 08:41:49 pm »

Hi,
I can only speculate, but I think Bob has the answer. The article mentions separate recordings for broadcast and album release. The upper mic is a standard broadcast vocal mic of the era, the lower looks like a typical add-on (for the time) for recording, but unidentifiable, and the PA(?) mic might be an RE15? I think three different uses begets three mics. Pre-Dante by a more than a little, probably pre split systems as well.
You are probably right.

I just "assumed" recording meant 1 mic-not 2.

Oh how times have changed
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

PHYSICS- NOT FADS!

Stephen Kirby

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2016, 08:50:55 pm »

Interesting article.  But I think this is another misuse of the term "feedback".  Hendrix's guitar was more than loud enough to create mechanical feedback though his backline.  Which he harnessed to great effect.  I don't know how it could feedback though the PA though.  It would obviously be picked up by the vocal mic and he might have been able to hear it coming though side fills.  But that isn't feed back unless they were trying to turn the mic up enough for him to hear his singing over the amps behind him.  In which case they might be squealing from normal feedback.  But I can't see how it could be coming from the guitar.
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Micheal Schriner

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2016, 09:47:46 pm »

I don't see how you could ever get the monitors loud enough to hear over the guitar amps. They also brought out some bongos.
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TrevorMilburn

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2016, 05:39:08 am »

I don't see how you could ever get the monitors loud enough to hear over the guitar amps. They also brought out some bongos.
Remember, the PA system was probably only 5 or 600 watts and the monitors would have probably been a couple of 50watt 4x12 columns (without horns). The only monitor cab I can see is a WEM 4x12 so it's very likely that the PA was also a WEM system with 5 or six 4x12s or similar a side (with possibly one a side for the seating to the side and behind the stage, all driven by 100watt WEM 'slaves'. These cabs used Goodmans speakers, designed for HiFi, not PA, so no way can the monitors be compared to modern wedges output wise especially with the copious amount of backline on display. I once saw Deep Purple at that venue - I was sitting way up in the gods (it's a 5-5500 seater venue) using a Marshall PA system rated IIRC at 600 watts - the phrase "tinklings at the edge of perception" comes to mind as I have sat next to people with MP3 players where the leakage from their headsets was louder than  Deep Purple was that night. As for the mics, I will go for the PA/Film/Broadcast options - I don't ever remember seeing mic/signal splitters back in those days - the first I ever remember seeing was an HH distribution amp used by the BBC in the mid seventies.
Edit: I have seen pics of some Altec A7s used by Hendrix at the RAH but can't be sure if it was this gig or another as he performed there several times.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2016, 05:46:03 am by TrevorMilburn »
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Steve M Smith

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3 vocal mics????
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2016, 06:45:14 am »

Thanks Bob-but that accounts for TWO mics-live and recording.

I might be wrong but I read Bob's reply as one for PA, one for film recording and one for audio recording.

These cabs used Goodmans speakers, designed for HiFi, not PA

Some WEM 2x12 and 4x12 cabs had Celestion Greenbacks.

Sometimes double vocal mics happen for other reasons. When Bryan Ferry appeared at Wembly as part of the first Live Aid concert, someone handed him a second microphone as he walked on and he did his set singing into two. I think they had a problem getting his mic signal for the TV broadcast so the simplest solution was to give him the second mic.




Steve.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2016, 06:57:02 am by Steve M Smith »
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David Buckley

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2016, 07:47:34 am »

...so it's very likely that the PA was also a WEM system with 5 or six 4x12s or similar a side (with possibly one a side for the seating to the side and behind the stage, all driven by 100watt WEM 'slaves'.

That exact setup was quite common when I started going to gigs as a yoof, and I can assure you half a dozen columns a side at full clip was quite loud in small venues.  It wasn't what one would call "undistorted", but it was loud.  The first device was usually a bandmaster, or an audiomaster for the upmarket folks, and then a stack of the 100W slaves.  Just for vocal mics, and a couple of mics on the kit.

Even louder was the folks who drove the WEM columns with Hiwatt 200W PA tops and slaves, another very popular combination. 
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Steve M Smith

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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2016, 08:44:32 am »

The first device was usually a bandmaster, or an audiomaster for the upmarket folks, and then a stack of the 100W slaves.

The 1970 Isle of Wight Festival used five Audiomaster mixers and all of the WEM cabinets and 100 watt slave amps Charlie Watkins owned together with The Who's WEM PA which was borrowed for the event.  I think Charlie also used it for The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park.


Steve.
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Re: 3 vocal mics????
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2016, 08:44:32 am »


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