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Author Topic: What microphones to use for children in plays and singing performances?  (Read 8798 times)

Jerome Laux

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We have a small theatre (250 seats).  We run a number of plays and concerts through it each year.

Concerts aren't a problem.  We can provide the artists w/ microphone or DI hookups and they sound fine (when they aren't too loud).

The plays are sometimes an issue - some of the actors don't project very well.

The one major problem are children's programs.  Some of the children don't project at all when speaking or singing.  It would be nice to be able to hear them.  We don't have the resources to be able to provide all of them with wireless microphones.

What sort of microphones could we set up before the stage?
Attached is a picture of the house set up for a concert.

As you can see it wouldn't be easy to fly any microphones.


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Scott Holtzman

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Pointing the speakers at the people instead of along the wall would make a huge improvement before you spend a dime.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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g'bye, Dick Rees

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When I was a kid in grade school plays, the directors made darned sure we faced the audience and spoke right out.

Technical solutions should be WAY secondary.  There's just no way anyone should have to bail out whoever is directing with "make-do" tech.

And in a beautiful, intimate theater like that you should not need any amplification. 
« Last Edit: March 22, 2016, 08:35:12 pm by dick rees »
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Jerome Laux

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Pointing the speakers at the people instead of along the wall would make a huge improvement before you spend a dime.

Old picture - but it is what I had.
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Scott Holtzman

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Old picture - but it is what I had.

Ah ok...Sorry for the diversion

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

Ghost Audio Visual Solutions, LLC
Cleveland OH
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David Simpson

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A common theatrical technique is to use floor mics such as Crown PCC160's or the Bartlett Audio Stage Floor Mic on the downstage edge of the stage. Just make sure that people know that when using boundary mics, you will not get that up close micing sound.

~Dave
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g'bye, Dick Rees

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A common theatrical technique is to use floor mics such as Crown PCC160's or the Bartlett Audio Stage Floor Mic on the downstage edge of the stage. Just make sure that people know that when using boundary mics, you will not get that up close micing sound.

~Dave

Boundary mics will NOT work for the OP.  Period.
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Mark Rombouts

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only thing rhat will really work in my opinion: dpa 4066 or something like this.
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John Rutirasiri

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We don't have the resources to be able to provide all of them with wireless microphones.

Do you have ANY wireless bodypack systems at this point?  If you do, this is an excellent mic at a throwaway price:
http://www.amazon.com/Pyle-Pro-PMEMS10-Omni-Directional-Microphone-System/dp/B003D2YRLA

If you can hit up the parents for sponsorship and donation, this is an excellent wireless system to go with the above mic:
http://www.amazon.com/Shure-PGXD14-Digital-Wireless-System/dp/B004K9RT8I

John R.
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"If it ain't broke, make it better."

Erik Jerde

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When I was a kid in grade school plays, the directors made darned sure we faced the audience and spoke right out.

Technical solutions should be WAY secondary.  There's just no way anyone should have to bail out whoever is directing with "make-do" tech.

And in a beautiful, intimate theater like that you should not need any amplification.

Dick is absolutely correct here.  The kids need to come to the show prepared.  The adults need to understand that kids can't always pull off what is needed.  Fact of the matter is you can't beat physics.  2x0=0 no matter what mic you use.

One thing I've seen done successfully with church children's choirs is to use broken mics or mics from those 3 for $30 packs to teach kids how to hold and sing into a microphone.  It must be part of their rehearsal process for their entire time rehearsing (months, not just when they show up at the theater) and the instructor must correct poor usage the same way he or she would correct vocal issues.

We all know mic technique is something which must be learned.  The adults leading these kids need to learn that too.  If they can't then you may as well try pulling a rabbit out of your ass.  You'll have just as much success.
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