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Author Topic: Electrocution?  (Read 3724 times)

Mike Sokol

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Electrocution?
« on: March 16, 2016, 10:49:08 pm »

I just published this article today about the so called "electrocution" of singer Grimes in Dublin last night. Yes, Keith Clark and I move pretty fast for a couple of old guys...

http://www.prosoundweb.com/article/electrocuted/P1/

I just hate when the media gets the words "electrocuted" and "shocked" mixed up.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2016, 12:03:33 am »

I'm shocked.

JR
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2016, 12:21:26 am »

I'm shocked.

JR

Great article, nice job Mike.
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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2016, 12:36:53 am »

In the article you mentioned the Faraday effect of being in a car struck by lightning. That brought to mind this picture. I don't remember where I first saw it, but I had a hard time finding it online. Maybe I saw it in some old science book. The text in the image wasn't in what I originally saw.

P.S. -- Found this interesting page: https://www.bkt-tires.com/around-bkt/blog/post/tire-dangers-after-equipment-lightning-strike
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Mark McFarlane

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2016, 04:42:23 am »

The best I can tell, there was possibly no shock involved.

The news articles talk about being 'electrocuted' by her (battery powered) IEMS, and the video clip shows her holding a battery powered mic and yanking her battery powered IEMS out of her ears while the speakers are emitting loud banging noises.

Just sounds like a poping noise problems, maybe with the IEM limiters set too high,...
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2016, 07:00:39 am »

But don't you want to see this experiment on stage?
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John Fruits

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2016, 07:01:56 am »

Something to consider is that perhaps she was electrocuted and is now.....gasp.....one of the undead.  Yes, I wonder if there is #ZombieGrimes trending now??????
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2016, 10:22:50 am »

The best I can tell, there was possibly no shock involved.

The news articles talk about being 'electrocuted' by her (battery powered) IEMS, and the video clip shows her holding a battery powered mic and yanking her battery powered IEMS out of her ears while the speakers are emitting loud banging noises.

Just sounds like a poping noise problems, maybe with the IEM limiters set too high,...
Getting "electrocuted" by a battery powered IEM seems a little difficult if it is wireless, but if it's hard wired an energized safety ground or external mains voltage path to that ground "could" present a shock hazard.

@Mike is there any kind of data base for music industry electrocution deaths?  Looking at OSHA shows something like 75 total electrocution deaths a year (2014), mostly associated with construction sites. 

The last actual musician death from electrocution I recall was in Argentina around a year ago. Surely hundreds or thousands of sub-lethal shock events since then. We need to keep educating the public, even if they're musicians.  8)

JR
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2016, 07:43:51 pm »

@Mike is there any kind of data base for music industry electrocution deaths?  Looking at OSHA shows something like 75 total electrocution deaths a year (2014), mostly associated with construction sites. 

The reports are all over the map on the number of electrocutions per year in the US. Depending on how you define who is a construction worker, it can be as low as 75 or up to 600 deaths by electrocution per year. See below.

Reducing common injuries and maintaining safety practices

According to the Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety and Health (eLCOSH), exposure to electricity is still a major cause of death among construction workers. Among electricians, the most serious concern is working with or near live wires without enlisting the proper safety procedures. Electrocutions kill an average of 143 construction workers each year. Data from 1992 through 2003 indicates electrical workers suffered the highest number of electrocutions per year (586 or 34 percent of the total deaths caused by electrocution), followed by site laborers, carpenters, supervisors of nonelectrical workers and roofers.

More than half the electrocutions of electrical workers were caused by direct or indirect contact with live electrical equipment and wiring, including lighting fixtures, circuit breakers, control panels, junction boxes and transformers. In other words, those deaths could have been prevented had proper lockout/tagout and de-energizing procedures been followed.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Washington, D.C., estimates there are approximately 350 electrical-related fatalities a year, which roughly equals one fatality per day. In addition, statistics from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Atlanta, show electrocution is the third- leading cause of death at work among 16 and 17-year-old workers, accounting for 12 percent of all workplace deaths.

In addition, The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data indicates 2,726 nonfatal electrical shocks involved days away from work a year, between 1992 and 2001, in private industry.

To the best of my knowledge, there are more than 30,000 nonfatal electrical shock accidents that occur each year, with a lot of incidents going unreported, said Chris Marquardt, safety director and field superintendent at Lemberg Electric Co. Inc., Wauwatosa, Wis. It is believed, he added, that for every 300,000 at-risk behaviors, there are about 300 recordable injuries, 30 lost-time injuries and one fatality. The cost of each major case of electrical shock can average between $1 million and $4 million.

According to OSHA, the occurrence of the most common injuries is increasing as the scope of work performed by the typical electrical contractor and the age of the work force increases.
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Mike Sokol
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Electrocution?
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2016, 07:43:51 pm »


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