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A basic network diagram for sound

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Rob Spence:
Nice diagram Bob

There have been lots of discussion of late as to why only a WAP and perhaps a switch are all that is needed in most cases. I agree.

However, since most consumer wifi devices are, as you say, combination devices with a WAP, switch and router in a box, I thought I would share how I use mine.

I use Netgear WNDR3700 wireless routers. They cost a little under $100 these days.
I like them because they seem to work well. While they are much larger that the apple boxes, I think their size and stand up orientation provides a better wifi signal. I have 2 and never have problems.

On other thing I like is that it easy to turn off the 2.4gHz radio as I like using the 5gHz band which, at this time, is less crowded.

I usually change the network number from the default (often 192.168.1.0) so to not conflict with other gear. I Also change the wifi SSID to something innocuous that does not suggest what the network is used for.

I configure the WAN port (or Internet port) to be DHCP and make sure the firewall is on and set to discard all unsolicited packets from the WAN port. This is often the default configuration.

At shows, I NEVER connect my network to any other network. To do so without knowledge of the foreign network is to invite problems with your network and therefore your show.

However, at home or at the shop, I can simply plug in the WAN port to my internal local network and have easy access to my own computers and easy ability to download updates for my audio gear.

I hope this helps.


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Bob Leonard:
The 3700 is an outstanding device for it's cost Rob. It's very flexible with a ton of features built in. More important though is being able easily modify those features, and Netgear does a nice job with it's Genie software.

Note that there is no modem in the 3700 (N600?). That's supplied by the service provider bringing the line to your house or office, and that's why you can use the port marked WAN. In this case that port is simply another 10/100/1000 switch port, the same as the other four (4) on the box.

If privacy becomes paramount, and it is, you can also turn off the SSID broadcast function. Just remember what you name the wireless network though, because you'll still need the name to authenticate.

Scott Holtzman:

--- Quote from: Bob Leonard on February 07, 2016, 06:21:49 am ---

Note that there is no modem in the 3700 (N600?). That's supplied by the service provider bringing the line to your house or office, and that's why you can use the port marked WAN. In this case that port is simply another 10/100/1000 switch port, the same as the other four (4) on the box.


--- End quote ---

The fact it doesn't have a modem has no bearing on function of the WAN port.  From a layer 2 perspective the WAN port is not in the same network as the LAN ports.  It's the input interface (untrusted to the router) and the router forwards packets to the and from the LAN.  For a router to operate the 2 (or more) ports must all me connected to different networks. 

You can't plug another host into the WAN port.

Rob Spence:

--- Quote from: Bob Leonard on February 07, 2016, 06:21:49 am ---The 3700 is an outstanding device for it's cost Rob. It's very flexible with a ton of features built in. More important though is being able easily modify those features, and Netgear does a nice job with it's Genie software.

Note that there is no modem in the 3700 (N600?). That's supplied by the service provider bringing the line to your house or office, and that's why you can use the port marked WAN. In this case that port is simply another 10/100/1000 switch port, the same as the other four (4) on the box.

If privacy becomes paramount, and it is, you can also turn off the SSID broadcast function. Just remember what you name the wireless network though, because you'll still need the name to authenticate.

--- End quote ---

I know there is no modem. I never ever even referred to one.

Turning off SSID is not valid security. There are lots of tools to see the network anyway. Use WAP security at least. I simply choose an SSID that won't attract people.


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Bob Leonard:

--- Quote from: Scott Holtzman on February 07, 2016, 05:17:36 pm ---The fact it doesn't have a modem has no bearing on function of the WAN port.  From a layer 2 perspective the WAN port is not in the same network as the LAN ports.  It's the input interface (untrusted to the router) and the router forwards packets to the and from the LAN.  For a router to operate the 2 (or more) ports must all me connected to different networks. 

You can't plug another host into the WAN port.

--- End quote ---

I suppose it would have been more correct to state it's not a DSL connector, T1 port or WIC adapter. The fact is that on this particular SOHO device the port is simply another switched port. Any standard patch cable will work.

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