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Author Topic: Router directivity  (Read 14717 times)

Douglas R. Allen

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #60 on: November 08, 2016, 05:24:03 am »

No point to point mode is for connecting two fixed sites, like two buildings.

Sharing is not a router or a WAP function and is in my opinion way out of scope for these all in one devices.  If you need to connect a printer to a LAN you need a print server or a network enabled printer.  To connect a hard drive you need a NAS device.  I can't see why you would burden a production network with either.

Is this a network that will be taken from location to location?

Scott;

Today most if not all Digital mixers have built in Ethernet out jack that plugs directly into a router/WAP. A Ipad/Android/Windows device running the mixers software controls the mixer wireless.

The 2003 Yamaha Digital mixer I have has only has USB out.  This was designed to run StudioManager software in a Windows OS. This gave computer control of the mixer although plugged directly into it. StudioManager has no way to add clients or other devices to it so multiple people can mix. Band members mixing their own monitors as an example.

In 2009 I purchased a Belkin router that has a USB input that would take the usb output from my board and I could , with a windows laptop, use the Studio Manager software and mix wireless from other area's in the room. The SM software is clunky at best and is very difficult to mix monitors with.

Roughly a year ago AirFader offered a O1v96 program that did all I needed.

http://www.airfader.com/support/getting-started.html?faqid=17

To keep it simple with less clutter around the desk I could go USB out , to my belkin , then wireless to a windows device. In my case it was a IBM X41 running the Airfader program.
This was ok to mix wireless as long as I didn't turn the meters section on as this required more cpu power than the IBM has. I upgraded to the Lenovo but again I couldn't turn the meters section on although it was great as it has "touch" screen instead of the "pen" system the old X41 has I felt the belkin wasn't enough to handle the required data with the meters section turned on so I tried a better router but it didn't connect with the desk with its usb system.

Through testing I did find I could have the new Lenovo touch laptop plugged straight into the mixer via usb and go ethernet out to my old belkin and have full meters on my Lenovo and Android tablets. After mixing with the Android's I am used to them enough to use them full time now.

Although it requires having the Lenovo plugged into the mixer I am going this way from now on so I don't need the USB directly into a WAP/router setup anymore. Although there is a little more clutter at the desk it is rock stable , even with the meters section turned on in the laptop and Android tablets.

So now my goal is to upgrade the old 2009 belkin with a better router or a WAP if the WAP will handle the multiple Android clients that I currently can with the older belkin.
Yes , I setup, tear down each night.

I hope this clears it up.

Douglas R. Allen


 
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #61 on: November 08, 2016, 03:18:06 pm »

Get the one with the adapter.  IIRC Ubiquiti uses a 24v PoE scheme instead of the more common 48v.

Most of the Ubiquiti devices that rely on 24V PoE come with a PoE injector and power supply anyway. Some of the higher-end Ubiquiti gear appears to support standard 48V PoE.
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Dave Garoutte

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #62 on: November 08, 2016, 03:48:12 pm »

Please forgive the stupid question.
Could you plug the Ubiqity WAP directly into the ethernet port without a switch and get wifi?
Or is there some function the switch does that's required?
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Josh Millward

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #63 on: November 08, 2016, 04:53:45 pm »

Please forgive the stupid question.
Could you plug the Ubiqity WAP directly into the ethernet port without a switch and get wifi?
Or is there some function the switch does that's required?

Essentially yes, you can do that. The only gotcha in that plan is that you need to plug the Ubiquiti into the power supply first, then plug from the power supply into the Ethernet port of whatever device you want to connect with.

As long as you have the IP address scheme resolved (be it a static IP solution or AutoIP), you should be able to connect right up.

The network switch simply provides the functionality to append more devices to the network so more things can see one another.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2016, 01:59:50 am »

Please forgive the stupid question.
Could you plug the Ubiqity WAP directly into the ethernet port without a switch and get wifi?
Or is there some function the switch does that's required?

As Josh mentioned, you'll need to plug the Ubiquiti UniFi WAP into the power supply, then the power supply to the switch.

But you won't be able to just "log in" to the UniFi. You'll need to run the controller software (downloadable from their website) to configure the UniFi.

For simple configs with a single UniFi, once you've configured the UniFi, you don't need to leave the controller running. If you want some of the advanced features, like roaming between WAPs, or advanced authentication (token, Kerberos, SSO, etc.), then you'll need to have the controller software running with the UniFis connected to it.

The UniFi Controller software can run as userspace application, a Windows, Mac, or Linux service, on a Raspberry Pi, on one of their UniFi Cloud Keys, or some of Ubiquiti's other network hardware.
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Douglas R. Allen

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2016, 07:25:59 am »

Not sure which was the best way to go so I picked up a Black Friday Netgear AC1750 to get by with until next summer. I will say even with this consumer grade netgear my outside range was increased out to 150 feet with very little mbps loss.
I also made my setup / flexibility easier as well. I can now place the netgear where I need it and still take advantage of the larger screen at my desk that AirFader provides.

I go out from my O1v96 hard wired usb to my laptop running AirFader. Wireless 5ghz to the netgear. This lets me put it very close by to have 888 plus mbps transfer but in an area that provides line of sight to the wireless mixing tablets. As an example if I am working side of stage I can still put it 5 to 10 feet away up on the front stage corner. I have it mounted on a adjustable pole with weighted base.
All my mobile tablets are 2.4ghz so they all run in that band from the netgear. The upgrade in signal strength in the 2.4 range from the Belkin I had before was much more than I expected. I do believe the netgear can be setup as a WAP so I am going to look into that as I go along. All in all a good intermediate range device to get me by for now.

https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-AC1750-Router-800MHz-Processor/dp/B00Z0V2NQ8 

Douglas R. Allen

Edit: correct name :-\


 
« Last Edit: November 27, 2016, 07:48:14 am by Douglas R. Allen »
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richard_cooper

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #66 on: November 26, 2016, 05:01:22 pm »

But you won't be able to just "log in" to the UniFi. You'll need to run the controller software (downloadable from their website) to configure the UniFi.

For simple configs with a single UniFi, once you've configured the UniFi, you don't need to leave the controller running. If you want some of the advanced features, like roaming between WAPs, or advanced authentication (token, Kerberos, SSO, etc.), then you'll need to have the controller software running with the UniFis connected to it.

This is only (partly) true for Ubiquiti's UniFi range. The Bullet, I believe we were talking about, has a more traditional web interface as part of the AirMAX range.

Also you can, in theory, set up UniFi devices using the iOS or Android app without a controller in "Easy Setup Mode". I have never done it however.
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Douglas R. Allen

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #67 on: November 26, 2016, 06:53:23 pm »

Netgear mounted on a adjustable pole. I'll paint the wood when it warms up. Around June...?....
On a table it will more than high enough for average gigs. Using 2 screws almost screwed all the way into the wood on top then going into the Netgears wall mounting holes in the bottom sliding them tight. I added some small soft "stick on" foam to keep constant pressure so it is very stable yet easy and quick to remove at night.

Douglas R. Allen

« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 07:28:14 pm by Douglas R. Allen »
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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #67 on: November 26, 2016, 06:53:23 pm »


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