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Author Topic: Router directivity  (Read 14676 times)

Bob Leonard

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2016, 10:19:35 pm »

Not Bob but,
I use one of these:
http://www.linksys.com/us/p/P-WRT1200AC/
Cheap, Reliable, good range, and easy to set up.

Even with the "Beam Forming" it still behaves like an omni for the most part.

And yes it has an evil router in it, but it's a plug in, turn it on, and setup your SSID and password (if you want) affair.


And it can be used as a dedicated WAP. Basic but I'll bet it works every bit as good as the basic WAP I use, and better than most in it's price range.
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richard_cooper

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2016, 05:11:28 am »

Switches;

http://www.linksys.com/us/business-network-switches/c/network-unmanaged-switch/

http://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/switches/

My personal use includes the switch below. Well made, great throughput, easy to hide and mount.

http://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/switches/click-switches/default.aspx

Big +1 for everything Bob has said.

There's just one caveat on switches I want to add that only applies if you need to also use Dante, or may plan on Dante in the future. Maybe you've got a Yamaha TF and might want to add the stage box, or considering the Mackie Axis to go with the DL32R.

The switched Bob lists all feature 802.3az (Energy Efficient Ethernet, or Green Ethernet) which is not compatible with Dante. https://www.audinate.com/sites/default/files/PDF/dante-network-blacklisted-eee-switches-audinate.pdf

For small unmanaged switches with Dante I've had luck with Linksys SE2500 there is also an 8-port version the SE2800 which I've not used.
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2016, 08:15:28 am »

Bob, thanks for taking the time to post this info. It has been instructive for a non IT type guy.
So far, my Airport Extreme home network is working just fine but in the future, I will look at the products you suggest if I want an improvement.
I like the idea of using a WAP and not a router for console remote access. Makes sense.

To review...
 I "could" connect one computer directly to the port of my non WiFi cable router.(not too secure however) but need a router to connect multiple devices that need internet access. (home network)
If I just have a group of network devices that do not need internet access, a switch will work. (RF rack)
I can connect a WAP (no router) to the RF rack switcher for remote wireless access.

Didn't plan on being an IT tech when I started in the audio biz but willing to learn  :)
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Douglas R. Allen

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2016, 09:14:06 am »

Thanks everyone for all the information!  I'm looking hard at the bullet. The only down side is it has no setup for usb as my current device does. Not a deal breaker but it will require the Boards USB out > Windows OS Laptop/netbook>Ethernet cable>bullet ( currently belkin ). This was last nights setup for a unplanned walk in gig.  Currently if needed I can go Boards USB out>Belkin>Tablet with Windows OS if need be.

Any major positive or neg in antenna style? Looking at several different ones currently. I only do 5/6 outside shows a year. Most are inside with side of stage setups now that I have tablet mixing available. I'm thinking omni would fit most of my shows but would antenna with some directional control be better? 

https://www.google.com/search?q=BM2HP&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=BM2HP&tbm=shop&spd=0

Douglas R. Allen

Last night I was called in short notice to mix at a local VFW. Used my yorkville rig with their PV monitor system. This picture was during setup. Boards USB>Netbook>Belkin>Android tablet. A mess around my mix location at first but pressed for time. I was running 72 mbps in this tiny room for the most part even with about 150 people crammed in there cell phones in hand. The guitar players young daughter put a sock on his microphone at home and he didn't noticed until the gig. We "sock it to em" all night....  ::)

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dave briar

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2016, 12:35:23 pm »

Yes kudos indeed Bob -- very helpful. One final question though: Does your WAP setup do DHCP (I'm thinking mainly for performer-controlled IEM mixing) or do you have to hand out IPs for those connections?

  ..dave
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Steve Oldridge

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2016, 01:11:06 pm »

A question for those who are using combined router/WAPs'.
My WRT54G is in use by the band - onstage next to the mixer (X32 producer) for IEM mixing and FOH control - because it was an old one sitting in the garage after I upgraded my home router. So no cost. Bob's recommendations are great, but my band (there's no SR involved on my part) is not about to invest in $1000+ WAP.
So - low cost - as in not much over $100 would be my target price.

And.. my WRT54G has been damaged already (got a broken antenna) because it is connected to the mixer rack via CAT5 and gets stuffed into the back of the case after gigs and it is not securely mounted anywhere. I run it DHCP and WPA to stop random access. It replaced some no-name $20 router the BL bought and works 1000 times better.

I have not been able to find an affordable rack-mount unit and EVERY unit I have researched has external antennas!

What do you guys do to securely mounting these devices (say in a rack), and where do you generally locate them?  Do any of you run external antennas for the router/WAP like we can do for the standard groupings of wireless mics and IEM devices? If so, is the $$ worth it?

 
« Last Edit: February 07, 2016, 01:52:09 pm by Steve.Oldridge »
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Rob Spence

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2016, 04:49:14 pm »

A question for those who are using combined router/WAPs'.
My WRT54G is in use by the band - onstage next to the mixer (X32 producer) for IEM mixing and FOH control - because it was an old one sitting in the garage after I upgraded my home router. So no cost. Bob's recommendations are great, but my band (there's no SR involved on my part) is not about to invest in $1000+ WAP.
So - low cost - as in not much over $100 would be my target price.

And.. my WRT54G has been damaged already (got a broken antenna) because it is connected to the mixer rack via CAT5 and gets stuffed into the back of the case after gigs and it is not securely mounted anywhere. I run it DHCP and WPA to stop random access. It replaced some no-name $20 router the BL bought and works 1000 times better.

I have not been able to find an affordable rack-mount unit and EVERY unit I have researched has external antennas!

What do you guys do to securely mounting these devices (say in a rack), and where do you generally locate them?  Do any of you run external antennas for the router/WAP like we can do for the standard groupings of wireless mics and IEM devices? If so, is the $$ worth it?

I use a Netgear WNDR3700. It is similar in appearance to the on the picture above. I often place it in a similar fashion. No external antenna but apparently a good internal set. Under $100 at many places.
It travels either in a road case with the mics or in the doghouse of the mixer.
My mixers in touring cases have dedicated network switches velcroed down I. The doghouse with the console port and Dante port(s) connected and a 10' cat5 cable to connect to the Netgear box.



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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #27 on: February 07, 2016, 05:32:52 pm »

A small local area network can accommodate up to 253 devices using the internal network of 192.168.1.x (x=.1 to .253) and a class "C" mask of 255.255.255.0


Actually a class 24 bit network is a pretty good size network.  The smallest usable network is a /30 that has two usable IP's. plus a network ID and a broadcast address.

These are important concept.  Usable hosts in a network is the product of a logical AND between the FF FF FF FF (FF is 255 in hex) and the subnet mask less 2.

The network ID is the reference base address used to create the entry in a routing table and the broadcast address is a reserved address that is used to send messages to all hosts (DHCP is a good example of a protocol that makes use of a broadcast message).

The highest numerical address is the broadcast and the lowest is the network ID.

Using this, we can C that in fact a 24 bit network (Class C, decimal subnet mask 255.255.255.) has 254 usable addresses.

x.x.x.0 = Is the network ID and x.x.x.255 is the broadcast.  2^8 = 256

Calling a 24 bit network Class C is common but often incorrect.  A class C network is one that uses the non-routable addresses defined by the IETF for us on private LAN's.  defined in RFC1918.  The reserved space for Class C is 10.x.x.x

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Rusty Stevens

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2016, 05:40:25 pm »

Rack mounted shelf, drill holes in the shelf to match the wall mount holes on your router. Machine screws and nuts in the wall mount screw holes. Strip of double sided tape to keep the router from sliding off the screws. Or just tape it to the shelf... Either way, as long as you aren't blocking vents it will be fine.

Luckily the antennas use a standard connector and are easy to find replacements for and use a standard cable connection. If you want antennas outside the case you can get cables and mount the antennas on a 1U blank plate and stick that in one of your slots, or make a stand to bolt them to. (or now that I think of it, get a shelf that has a plate covering the mounted end, and bolt the antennas in there.)


A question for those who are using combined router/WAPs'.
My WRT54G is in use by the band - onstage next to the mixer (X32 producer) for IEM mixing and FOH control - because it was an old one sitting in the garage after I upgraded my home router. So no cost. Bob's recommendations are great, but my band (there's no SR involved on my part) is not about to invest in $1000+ WAP.
So - low cost - as in not much over $100 would be my target price.

And.. my WRT54G has been damaged already (got a broken antenna) because it is connected to the mixer rack via CAT5 and gets stuffed into the back of the case after gigs and it is not securely mounted anywhere. I run it DHCP and WPA to stop random access. It replaced some no-name $20 router the BL bought and works 1000 times better.

I have not been able to find an affordable rack-mount unit and EVERY unit I have researched has external antennas!

What do you guys do to securely mounting these devices (say in a rack), and where do you generally locate them?  Do any of you run external antennas for the router/WAP like we can do for the standard groupings of wireless mics and IEM devices? If so, is the $$ worth it?
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2016, 05:55:03 pm »

Rack mounted shelf, drill holes in the shelf to match the wall mount holes on your router. Machine screws and nuts in the wall mount screw holes. Strip of double sided tape to keep the router from sliding off the screws. Or just tape it to the shelf... Either way, as long as you aren't blocking vents it will be fine.


Locating the transceiver in the rack may  seem to be a good idea but it is not.

Coax cable has significant loss at the frequencies that wifi operates at.  Since the return path is more often the issue than the transmit path the very weak signals should not be made to travel down the coax back to the receiver. 

You want to use a WaP that support power over Ethernet.  Get the receiver right on the back of the antenna with the shortest length of coaxial cable possible.
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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

Ghost Audio Visual Solutions, LLC
Cleveland OH
www.ghostav.rocks

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Router directivity
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2016, 05:55:03 pm »


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