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Author Topic: Router directivity  (Read 14677 times)

Douglas R. Allen

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Router directivity
« on: February 04, 2016, 07:30:12 pm »

With a basic router such as this as an example.      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833314063&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleKWLess&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleKWLess-_-DSA-_-CategoryPages-_-NA&gclid=CN-liK6s38oCFc6RHwodZd8Cyw&gclsrc=aw.ds

Do these have directivity to them? Is there a correct way to place them? Are they omni spherical or do they have a reduced weak output area? 

Been searching but can't seem to find anything.

Douglas R. Allen
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Rusty Stevens

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2016, 07:39:18 pm »

IT guy in my day job.
Most routers are fairly omni. You start getting reflections off of the environment and obstructions blocking the signal, and that changes the pattern some. Consumer grade WiFi routers are designed to be placed in the center of a service area.
Manufacturing limitations, aesthetic design considerations, and environment will cause your mileage to vary.

With a basic router such as this as an example.      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833314063&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleKWLess&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleKWLess-_-DSA-_-CategoryPages-_-NA&gclid=CN-liK6s38oCFc6RHwodZd8Cyw&gclsrc=aw.ds

Do these have directivity to them? Is there a correct way to place them? Are they omni spherical or do they have a reduced weak output area? 

Been searching but can't seem to find anything.

Douglas R. Allen
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2016, 07:54:10 pm »

IT guy in my day job.
Most routers are fairly omni. You start getting reflections off of the environment and obstructions blocking the signal, and that changes the pattern some. Consumer grade WiFi routers are designed to be placed in the center of a service area.
Manufacturing limitations, aesthetic design considerations, and environment will cause your mileage to vary.

Geez an IT guy should know that a router forwards data packets between network segments.

I am unaware of any RF functionality of routers.

Some routers have built in wifi access points.  It's important not to confuse the roles of these different devices.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2016, 08:02:20 pm »

There are some beamforming WAPs (which may have router functions as well ;) ) as well as a few "smart" beamforming WAPs that find a connected device and then narrow in on that to reduce multipath issues.
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Scott Holtzman

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2016, 08:18:34 pm »

There are some beamforming WAPs (which may have router functions as well ;) ) as well as a few "smart" beamforming WAPs that find a connected device and then narrow in on that to reduce multipath issues.

I am sure there are, and some day they may genetically engineer egg laying milk pigs.

What is important is people know the difference between a layer 2 access point and a layer 3 router.  A consumer router is a crappy router and and a cheap access point all rolled into one.

A dedicated access point will provide much better performance, especially if the role is to create a wifi network to support remote control of audio and lighting consoles.

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman

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Roland Clarke

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2016, 04:47:45 am »

Geez an IT guy should know that a router forwards data packets between network segments.

I am unaware of any RF functionality of routers.

Some routers have built in wifi access points.  It's important not to confuse the roles of these different devices.

In fairness, the link provided in the original post shows a Belkin Wi Fi router and his text alludes to the fact that is what he is talking about.  I expect that there are "better" Wi Fi routers available, but Like most RF products (radio mics for instance) there are probably limits to output power to prevent too much interference.  Ultimately I suspect that there is probably little difference between the very best and the average performers.  I don't know if anyone make a directional router ariel, there are directional receiver ariels such as used by people with caravans to pick up and boost weaker signals, perhaps they can be adapted?
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Samuel Sjöbergsson

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2016, 07:59:34 am »

If you don't need the router part then there is some directional access points for example ubnt.com has some that you can configure as either access point or point to point

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Keith Broughton

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2016, 09:42:09 am »

With a basic router such as this as an example.      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833314063&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleKWLess&cm_mmc=KNC-GoogleKWLess-_-DSA-_-CategoryPages-_-NA&gclid=CN-liK6s38oCFc6RHwodZd8Cyw&gclsrc=aw.ds

Do these have directivity to them? Is there a correct way to place them? Are they omni spherical or do they have a reduced weak output area? 

Been searching but can't seem to find anything.

Douglas R. Allen
Most WiFi access points are pretty much omni directional.
If you need directionality, consider WAP with detatchable antenns and use directional antennas.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2016, 10:25:12 am »

I am sure there are, and some day they may genetically engineer egg laying milk pigs.

What is important is people know the difference between a layer 2 access point and a layer 3 router.  A consumer router is a crappy router and and a cheap access point all rolled into one.

A dedicated access point will provide much better performance, especially if the role is to create a wifi network to support remote control of audio and lighting consoles.



I have been saying this for years Scott and constantly state in our forums the need for a WAP, not a router. There are two things that stop most people from understanding the difference.

1. Walk into any Best Buy or similar store and almost everything available will be a router. Hence, the "That's what I need" attitude.

2. Laymen don't know that there is a huge difference between accessing a network and routing between networks.

Point #2 is the root, or should I say route, of all evil. Laymen don't understand routing, protocols, subnets, IP schemes, and most of all, wireless limitations, power concepts, security, channel selection and more.

Another point that could be made which may help in understanding is this. Any time two (2) or more devices communicate via a specific topology and protocol with each other a network has been created.

Any time that isolated network must seek or attach to any other network utilizing the same or dissimilar protocols, hardware or topology a router must make the translation to that dissimilar network. - - UNLESS, the protocol and IP addresses are the same for both networks.

Attaching a single Ipad to a mixer amounts to the creation of a small local network, a connection between two devices using the same protocol, IP address scheme, and a topology either wired or wireless.

Attaching additional devices to that small local network does not have to include routing to or from another network, that is unless the network MUST access a dissimilar network, i.e. The world wide web.

The small local area network can be expanded, either by attaching wired devices through the use of a hub or switch, or by attaching to and accessing that local area network wirelessly.

Accessing the LAN is a key point. If the LAN is to be accessed from another state, country, or remotely, then the users requests and data must be routed using many dissimilar networks. Dissimilar because they will not use the same IP scheme or even the same topology, and hence a translation is required from LAN to LAN across the , wait for it, WAN.

99% of the time users tend to unknowingly add complexity and probable/possible failure into what should be a very simple local area network, specifically because the word router is ingrained in the layman's network verbiage, and the wrong tool is chosen and used.

let's remove the complexity and attempt to use the correct terminology. If your goal is to expand or create a small local area network comprised of a board, DAW, DSP, amplifiers, etc., your tools will be Ethernet cable, small switches or hubs, and for those devices not physically attached to the network that require wireless ACCESS to that local area network you will need an access point, commonly known as a WAP (wireless access point).

If your local area network should develop a need to attach to the world wide web, or even another network using a dissimilar IP scheme, then you will need to ROUTE your network to the dissimilar network.

A small local area network can accommodate up to 253 devices using the internal network of 192.168.1.x (x=.1 to .253) and a class "C" mask of 255.255.255.0

Also keep in mind that many people will use a router because of the routers DHCP capability. In small networks, such as those being discussed here utilizing a WAP for access there will usually NOT be a DHCP server available, which is part of the routers functionality, and hence STATIC IP addresses not only should be used, but must be used. I'll also dispel the myth that assigning static IP addresses is tedious and complex. WRONG. Static addresses are by far the easiest way to insure your devices connect. Group your devices, give them each an address on the network and your done. No need to wonder if DHCP has assigned the same address. no lease, easy to troubleshoot, and easy to find on your network.

OK, so that's all I can say without building huge complexity into the conversation, and remember sport fans, you either want to access your network, or you want to route to another network. (Bridges will not be discussed here).


And to get back on track with the OP's question. No, that piece of shit is not directional.


https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=WAP&tbm=shop
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Keith Broughton

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Re: Router directivity
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2016, 12:11:18 pm »

I have been saying this for years Scott and constantly state in our forums the need for a WAP, not a router.
A rather long and unrelated post to the OP but an interesting read none the less. Seems to have hit a sore spot  ;)

OK, Ill bite...
I get the idea that a router is needed to access the Internet, and that's what most people need so no wonder that's what is on the shelves of retailers.(no surprise there)

Can I use a WAP to connect directly to my console or do I need a switch as well?
If I need a switch, why buy 2 pieces of equipment when I can get what is required in a router?
Is the performance of a WAP that much more superior to a "combination" router WAP?
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Router directivity
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2016, 12:11:18 pm »


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