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Author Topic: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00  (Read 18754 times)

Dan Andrews

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Hi All,
I was wondering if anyone has used the New Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? 

I think it coast around $2000.00 U.S.   For that kind of money is it the answer to control voice, without adding Compressors, EQ, Limiters, ect.?

All the Best,  Dan
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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 10:03:33 am »

Hi All,
I was wondering if anyone has used the New Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? 

I think it coast around $2000.00 U.S.   For that kind of money is it the answer to control voice, without adding Compressors, EQ, Limiters, ect.?

All the Best,  Dan

What do you mean by "control voice"?  Are you having a particular problem or problems? 

Phonic is generally regarded as a very low level line as far as equipment goes.  If you're looking for a low-priced digital mixer the Presonus StudioLive is probably the minimum acceptable piece.  More standard equipment lines such as Yamaha will be available to you in the used market.  The very fact that they hold their value and are sought after as used gear should tell you something about the initial quality.  I have never seen Phonic gear last long enough to make it to the used market which is a poor reflection on their build quality and usability.

       
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Don Sullivan

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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 10:26:30 am »

Haven't heard it, but for the money I'd get an 01v96. I enjoy 2 dynamics processors on each input.
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Thomas Lamb

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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2011, 11:12:23 am »

Hi All,
I was wondering if anyone has used the New Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? 

I think it coast around $2000.00 U.S.   For that kind of money is it the answer to control voice, without adding Compressors, EQ, Limiters, ect.?

All the Best,  Dan



+1 for the presonus and the used Yamaha both. For the same Money you can get a new presonus studio live 16 $1850.00ish and I think you will find it is a much better unit even though I have admittedly never touched the phonic. However typically on par or lower quality than behringer (ouch that hurts). We have installed many and they have all been great.  at a later date you can add a second sl16 for 32 channels I needed.
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Tom Young

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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2011, 02:25:23 pm »

What do you mean by "control voice"?  Are you having a particular problem or problems? 

Phonic is generally regarded as a very low level line as far as equipment goes.  If you're looking for a low-priced digital mixer the Presonus StudioLive is probably the minimum acceptable piece.  More standard equipment lines such as Yamaha will be available to you in the used market.  The very fact that they hold their value and are sought after as used gear should tell you something about the initial quality.  I have never seen Phonic gear last long enough to make it to the used market which is a poor reflection on their build quality and usability.   

I'll add to those who advise against buying unrealistically cheap products and especially digital processors and mixers. I don't need to name names. The price tells you what to expect.

Aside from holding their value (and none of the cheap products do), with digital processsors (as in system processors) and mixers there simply is too much at stake to risk you services to the greater likliehood for failure, noise issues and then, when you need help, lousy service.

In "pro audio" there seems to be more manufacturers pandering to those with no sense of what "good" costs. And there are more and more music stores, local pro audio shops and internet sellers who (along with these manufacturers)  see churches as prime targets for selling this junk.

Presonus has a very good track record and thus I suspect (and have heard reports indicating that) their digital mixers are a good value. As others have said, a used Yamaha is very likely to be a good deal, although you should (like anything else you buy used) check it out to ensure it hasn't been beaten up and that you have some recourse if things immediatley go wrong.

FWIW
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Dan Andrews

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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2011, 08:28:42 am »


What do you mean by "control voice"?  Are you having a particular problem or problems? 


Our minister voice goes from a whisper to a shout, so I added a DBX 266 Compressor to try and control the extreme volume differences,
but found that it isn't enough, even with the compression turned up to infinity, which I have been told makes it a limiter. We also get feedback before I get the volume turned up to what I think we need.  Looking at the coust of all the add-on equment, I thought haveing a digital mixer with everything built in should sound better and be chepper in the long run.



Phonic is generally regarded as a very low level line as far as equipment goes. 

That's what I suppected, but wasn't sure.

If you're looking for a low-priced digital mixer the Presonus StudioLive is probably the minimum acceptable piece.  More standard equipment lines such as Yamaha will be available to you in the used market. 

Here in Australia I don't there is much in the used market.

The very fact that they hold their value and are sought after as used gear should tell you something about the initial quality.  I have never seen Phonic gear last long enough to make it to the used market which is a poor reflection on their build quality and usability.

     
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Taylor Phillips

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Re: Has anyone used the Phonic Summit Digital Mixer? around $2000.00
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2011, 07:19:44 pm »

Quote
Our minister voice goes from a whisper to a shout, so I added a DBX 266 Compressor to try and control the extreme volume differences,
but found that it isn't enough, even with the compression turned up to infinity, which I have been told makes it a limiter. We also get feedback before I get the volume turned up to what I think we need.  Looking at the coust of all the add-on equment, I thought haveing a digital mixer with everything built in should sound better and be chepper in the long run.

If you're not able to control his voice with the compressor like that, it might be possible that when your minister shouts from the pulpit, what you're hearing is from his mouth and not your speakers, and all the technology in the world won't fix that.  I'd bet the feedback is result of the system design and configuration that can't be completely fixed with technology either, though some could help.
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Mac Kerr

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More compressors is not always a good thing
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2011, 08:07:04 pm »

Our minister voice goes from a whisper to a shout, so I added a DBX 266 Compressor to try and control the extreme volume differences, but found that it isn't enough, even with the compression turned up to infinity, which I have been told makes it a limiter. We also get feedback before I get the volume turned up to what I think we need.  Looking at the coust of all the add-on equment, I thought haveing a digital mixer with everything built in should sound better and be chepper in the long run.   

You can't get the voice loud enough because you are lowering the gain on that channel by over compressing. One of the side effects of this is feedback. Just because a sound source has a lot of dynamic range doesn't mean the proper response is to compress the shit out of it. The pastor uses his voice for dramatic effect, and the compression is working against his intent. I have run into very few instances where I wanted to use more than a 3:1 compression ratio, and a threshold that yields a gain reduction of about 6dB-8dB at maximum levels. The feedback is caused because you are turning the channel up to compensate for the gain reduction from compression, so when the level goes down, and the compressor releases, the channel gain goes up, and you get feedback.

Try 2.5:1 or 3:1 ratio and start with the threshold very high so there is no compression. Gradually turn down the threshold till you are getting at the most 6dB-8dB of gain reduction on his loudest voice, and let the dynamics exist beyond that. Even that much gain reduction may be too much if it reduces the dramatic impact of the pastor's words.

The soundman's job is not to make everything sound the same, it is to make everything sound right.

Mac
« Last Edit: March 28, 2011, 11:16:27 pm by Mac Kerr »
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Brad Weber

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Re: More compressors is not always a good thing
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2011, 12:27:44 am »

+1 to Mac's and Taylor's comments.  When addressing dynamics and related feedback a compressor is not going to alleviate all acoustical, system or operational factors, it won't replace an operator and if applied improperly, it can make things worse.
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Dan Andrews

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Re: More compressors is not always a good thing
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2011, 04:09:11 am »

+1 to Mac's and Taylor's comments.  When addressing dynamics and related feedback a compressor is not going to alleviate all acoustical, system or operational factors, it won't replace an operator and if applied improperly, it can make things worse.

Thanks Guys,

If I reduce the compression will I need a limiter to keep the record volume from clipping?

Thanks for your help.

All the Best, Dan
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