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Author Topic: "Age-ism" In Live Sound  (Read 13570 times)

Jack Arnott

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #50 on: December 14, 2015, 03:05:41 pm »

Hi all,

I'm 19 years old, have been working in audio for almost five years now, ....I'm told by (anonymous boss) to hold off on taking the call while he checks to see if I can handle the gig. After three days or so, (anonymous boss) will write back and say that they have found someone else to take the gig. To me, that seems like he's actively searching for someone else to take the call so I can't work it. This has happened a few times now, and only with this company- the other three view me as just another freelancer. Wondering if any of you have had similar experiences when you were first starting out and if anyone could give advice on how to handle this?

Thanks in advance,

Robert

Hi Robert, first off, you handle yourself very well in print/writing, so good job on that.

Does ageism exist? Of course. I am much less likely to hire the young punk, no matter how likable, because he is going to cost me more money with his inexperience. But I am also aware of the circle of life, and that people have to start somewhere.

I have not read the whole thread, but my take is, don't worry about it. Not everyone is going to like you, and hire you. If you are having problems with only one person, but are getting along well and getting hires from other people, this is a good sign. As JR said, sounds like a (his) personal problem.

Also the fact that you have communicated to him, and he changes the subject. This is his problem.

Keep putting in your name, but if anything comes up in the meantime, take it. If he ever does call back, then tell him straight up what happened. Thanks for calling back, but I took another offer in the mean time. It will make you only more appealing, as it shows you have other options, and other people who do trust you.

Are you getting his with ageism. Undoubtedly, but you will see much worse in this industry. Not every situation will be a good match for you. (There are more situations that are not a match for me, than those that are.)
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2015, 04:14:41 pm »

I would suggest never mentioning "ageism" again...

Keep your head down, work hard, and earn a good rep.

You will be too old before you know it so enjoy your youth while you can.


JR
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Bob Leonard

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #52 on: December 14, 2015, 06:26:11 pm »

Amen brother John. One day you wake up and everything hurts. Life is never the same after that.
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BOSTON STRONG........
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I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Steve M Smith

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #53 on: December 15, 2015, 02:45:31 am »

One day you wake up and everything hurts.
Definitely.  I realised I wasn't twenty anymore last weekend when I was up in the roof space of my mother's house fitting a new light fitting.


Steve.
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David Scoville

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #54 on: December 17, 2015, 12:18:34 am »

I would suggest never mentioning "ageism" again...

Keep your head down, work hard, and earn a good rep.

You will be too old before you know it so enjoy your youth while you can.
JR

Exactly, look, life happens, never expect everyone to throw arms open wide because you show up.  It sounds like alot of doors have already opened up early for you at your age. Age-ism, lmao, seriously?
   For most of us old guys around we started young, did all thecrap work for crappy pay, and maybe after several years we got the shot, some never do. But ya know, hell we loved the crap work because we were mainly just happy to be there, learn everything, everyday something, albiet small maybe, but something everyday.
   Trusting someone with high dollar equipment is one thing, the little part about how many hundred ways one can get killed is another. Experience is time spent.
   Please dont take this too wrong but yeah, life is tough, luck is really when opportunity meets the well preparred, so be that guy. And remember when you get the turn really be ready, because news of bad travels fast and far and is rarely forgotten.
   Keep at it, time will get you there, and hell, one day you may just take the plunge, be the man and buy build rent or cobble together your own show, with your entire career on the line who will you trust?
   Hang in there, bills and dues just gotta be paid. Honestly best of luck.
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Jim McKeveny

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #55 on: December 19, 2015, 07:29:07 am »

One day you wake up and everything hurts.

I remember when "waking up all stiff" meant something else entirely..
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Pete Erskine

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Re: "Age-ism" In Live Sound
« Reply #56 on: December 19, 2015, 11:01:15 am »

Wondering if any of you have had similar experiences when you were first starting out and if anyone could give advice on how to handle this?

Thanks in advance,

Robert

When I started out, around 1968 when I was 20, it seemed that there was no way to promote myself.  Had a little sound company and was not possible to advertise or cold call any gigs.

Over time it became obvious that this industry (sound for live events) works only on a referral basis or more specifically you only get hired if the client has met you on another job and liked your work...and you.

The fastest way to get known is to be nice, pleasant, and do a competent job.  Don't try to be the A1 mixer, be happy to do production assistant or audio grunt work.  Get to know the people you are working with.  They may be in a position to hire you later.

I was on a musical tour where the first week out one of the crew was let go and sent home not because he couldn't do a good job but because he was too negative and complained a lot.  Be nice, even if you haven't slept for a long time.

Strangely enough, Facebook is terrific for those in this kind of work.  Every job might be with a different bunch of people and you might not see them until the same job comes around next year.  FB lets you stay a part of your new friends lives.

Also always try to learn.  Every day learn at least one thing...how to coil a cable...what an intercom beltpack is...how does comm work...

Read all the industry mags...know what equipment is out there.  All manuals for sound equipment are online so download and read.

Ageism also means becoming known as an expert, even if you are young..  If you are competent and pleasant you will be looked upon as a valuable resource.

Specializing in a less popular kind of audio helps too.  Comms, RF coordination, and Protools are a few.

Look over my website, www.bestaudio.com.  There are a lot of tools, information and links for the newbie and the expert alike.

Good luck.

Pete
« Last Edit: December 19, 2015, 11:06:08 am by Pete Erskine »
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Pete Erskine
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