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Author Topic: Getting hazed by venues  (Read 1425 times)

Taylor Hall

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Getting hazed by venues
« on: November 17, 2015, 08:20:12 pm »

Well, not like that, at least. ;)

We've been getting a lot of small acts recently asking for basic lighting and we're more than happy to provide. Just some simple pars for washes and whatnot, and a couple scanners and flowers if they want to engage the crowd a bit. That's all been well and good, but a few times now, during our debriefing with the customers we've been told that they wish the lighting "popped" more. And I know exactly what they mean. A lightshow without some kind of haze in the air is just... flat. It lacks depth and can make many carefully planned elements easily missed, especially with moving heads/lasers.

Most venues put on the brakes when you mention fog due to their smoke detectors. We've tried working with the venues to meet a middle ground but it always ends in one of a few ways: 1) NO. 2) I'll OK it if I hear it from the Fire Marshall. 3) Give us a $XXXX.00 fee.

A lot of the problem lies in that we aren't the ones renting the venue, we're just "the sound guys" so we don't really have any bargaining power since our names aren't on the contract. We just show up, make light/noise for the band/DJ and then leave.

Are there any methods you guys use to help put venues at ease regarding fog? Whether its negotiation tactics, or physical manipulation of the fog itself that makes it less prone to triggering alarms. We have a great fogger that we love to use outdoors and for venues that will allow it, and I don't have to tell you what a difference even a puff of smoke can do for any lighting rig.
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Cailen Waddell

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Re: Getting hazed by venues
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2015, 08:57:21 pm »

I have found different systems have different sensitivities to differed fogs.  Some are ok with df-50s but not mdg. Some are only ok with Le maitre. 

The only way to make sure it happens is for the band to insist on it in their contract.  I get the impression at the level you are working at, the bands don't have that kind of bargaining power. 

If the venue has heat detectors only clearly you are good to go.  If it's smoke the system really needs to be silenced and put in test mode with a fireman on fire watch.  Those are the two safe ways to do it.  If one of those isn't an option then I wouldn't negotiate much since if something happened you could be liable possibly. 

I find enough lights upstage pointing downstage that are bright enough and enough humidity in the room and you can make it ok without haze. But haze is clearly better. 


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Nate Armstrong

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Re: Getting hazed by venues
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2015, 02:56:06 pm »

I have had much luck with the martin jem K1 Hazer. The haze particulates seem much much much  finer than that of my radiance.
The battery powered clean out function after power removal is a nice touch as well.  its kind of bulky but i think they have a Jr. model now.
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John Weaver

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Re: Getting hazed by venues
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2015, 03:19:29 pm »

Well, not like that, at least. ;)

We've been getting a lot of small acts recently asking for basic lighting and we're more than happy to provide. Just some simple pars for washes and whatnot, and a couple scanners and flowers if they want to engage the crowd a bit. That's all been well and good, but a few times now, during our debriefing with the customers we've been told that they wish the lighting "popped" more. And I know exactly what they mean. A lightshow without some kind of haze in the air is just... flat. It lacks depth and can make many carefully planned elements easily missed, especially with moving heads/lasers.

Most venues put on the brakes when you mention fog due to their smoke detectors. We've tried working with the venues to meet a middle ground but it always ends in one of a few ways: 1) NO. 2) I'll OK it if I hear it from the Fire Marshall. 3) Give us a $XXXX.00 fee.

A lot of the problem lies in that we aren't the ones renting the venue, we're just "the sound guys" so we don't really have any bargaining power since our names aren't on the contract. We just show up, make light/noise for the band/DJ and then leave.

Are there any methods you guys use to help put venues at ease regarding fog? Whether its negotiation tactics, or physical manipulation of the fog itself that makes it less prone to triggering alarms. We have a great fogger that we love to use outdoors and for venues that will allow it, and I don't have to tell you what a difference even a puff of smoke can do for any lighting rig.

Hazers are less prone to set off alarms than are foggers because of the dispersion typically. If using a fogger, run a strong fan to help dissipate the particulates.

In regards to dealing with the venue, I know some people who have created info sheets to help people with questions understand that haze has no adverse effects. Also, I've heard you can get an off-duty Fire Marshall for about $25-30 per hour & if needed, they can stand by the fire alarm system with a key in it, ready to shut it off if it kicks on. The big consideration is how much saturation you can use without tripping the alarm. A little haze can go a long way in making lights "pop". If you can get in and test your saturation and how often you have to run it to achieve that effect, you can get a good sense. The rule of thumb is to stand next to the lights & look out toward the audience, if you can see the beams from that direction, you should have enough haze.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2015, 12:27:22 am by John Weaver »
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Mac Kerr

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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2015, 11:06:59 pm »

We just bought a Chauvet Haze 3D hurricane

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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2015, 11:06:59 pm »


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