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Author Topic: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI  (Read 10117 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2015, 05:13:48 pm »

Not to veer off my own thread but speaking of smoke detectors, my old detector was a few decades old, and they are so cheap I decided to replace the entire detector with this years battery.

Smoke detectors are supposed to be replaced every 10 years. I replaced all the detectors in my house when we moved in during spring of 2012. A month ago I had to replace one because it started false alarming.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2015, 06:22:37 am »

John,

This is the kitchen, surrounded with water, multiple appliances, all types of chances to kill yourself with electricity. Why not run a new #12 cable from the kitchen to the panel?
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Mike Sokol

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2015, 07:37:55 am »

John,

This is the kitchen, surrounded with water, multiple appliances, all types of chances to kill yourself with electricity. Why not run a new #12 cable from the kitchen to the panel?

My son is a chef, and one of the first things I gave him in college was a NCVT and showed him how to test all those metal surfaces for voltage. Commercial kitchens are more dangerous than rock stages because, just as you noted, there's lots of metal appliances and tables, plus water is everywhere.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2015, 10:00:16 am »

I am not going to rewire my house, and hope the GFCI will prevent serious harm, but the energized mixer ground, even at very low current is annoying.

Yesterday I took the back off the mixer and see a lot of energized metal parts associated with the motor speed switch out in the open. There was also a fine coating of black/gray powder everywhere, probably from motor brushes after decades of wear.

Since a stinger cap to neutral doesn't squash this voltage completely (only drops to 40 VAC) I am really tempted to pull a separate ground wire from my panel..maybe 15' away but through a wall.  Wont be pretty but I don't feel like completely tearing down the mixer... A solid ground could possibly clear the leakage path or just catch fire.  ;D

JR

PS: I already plan to ground the outlet in my laundry room that my washing machine is plugged into. My dishwasher cord goes through the wall to plug into that same outlet. Not crazy to run a new ground wire through the hole into the kitchen.

PPS: Of course my NCVT says the mixer is hot, but it says all my kitchen appliances are hot so not very helpful.
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #24 on: October 26, 2015, 01:50:17 pm »

One other option would be to do like I habitually do anytime I step onto a farm site. Slip on a nice heavy (dry!!!) pair of leather gloves. If it is wet or hot enough to make gloves sweaty get out the voltage rated gloves.  Not always convenient, but the older I get the more allergic I am to lectricty.


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Steve Swaffer

Jason Lavoie

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #25 on: October 26, 2015, 02:04:03 pm »

No DCR or C  to my cold water pipe under the sink... (but I haver a plastic water feed from the meter to house since my steel pipe rusted out).

Any chance your panel was solely grounded to the water system (it happens), and now that ground is floating?

Jason
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2015, 02:36:33 pm »

Any chance your panel was solely grounded to the water system (it happens), and now that ground is floating?

Jason

No there is a proper ground wire from my meter panel straight down into the earth. I know the distro is grounded from my miswired extension cord and enertgized chassis sump pump in my wet yard.  :o
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Sorry I can't see wearing heavy leather gloves just for operating my kitchen mixer..

JR
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

David Buckley

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #27 on: October 26, 2015, 06:45:36 pm »

Something like this, perhaps?

No, not some random cap found on eBay.  A cap that is connected from line to ground should be a Y rated cap, which are designed for this sort of application.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #28 on: October 26, 2015, 07:26:47 pm »

No, not some random cap found on eBay.  A cap that is connected from line to ground should be a Y rated cap, which are designed for this sort of application.
yeah, that too... but wrong value first...wrong type next... The 0.15uF i used to confirm that it didn't work was A) only 100V, and b) not a Y cap...   Am I in trouble? (no not still plugged in.)

I did a search for 0.15uF Y caps for my stinger GFCI drop and that apparently is not a common value for that technology cap (most are smaller values).

But I am still looking because that is the value it needs to be to meet my dual requirements (>5 mA and <10mA at 120VAC-60Hz to trip the GFCI while doing no harm to the meat puppets)
 
JR
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Don't tune your drums half-ass. Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Mike Sokol

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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2015, 08:02:26 pm »

No, not some random cap found on eBay.  A cap that is connected from line to ground should be a Y rated cap, which are designed for this sort of application.

I'm not suggesting Line to Ground. This would be connected Ground to Neutral. ;D  I know that's a small distinction, but you're probably correct. So where do you buy Y-rated suppression capacitors? I've been looking around but don't see a source.
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Mike Sokol
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Re: How much fun (shock) can we have without tripping our GFCI
« Reply #29 on: October 26, 2015, 08:02:26 pm »


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