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Author Topic: baseboard electric heat  (Read 4359 times)

Bob Leonard

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2015, 08:30:45 am »

Same here. My 1923 house had K&T wiring in a lot of the rooms, with the light switches on the neutral side. So turning the switch "off" would cause the the fixture to go "hot". I found that out by accident some 20 years ago when I thought the circuit was unenergized Since then I've upgraded most of the wiring to modern code, and corrected all the silly stuff. Getting ready to put in a new panel with separate ground and neutral bus bars this spring. Right now the 60's panel has all the ground and neutral jammed into the same bus-bar with no room to correct it. I'll add a generator transfer switch at the same time that I change out the panel. 

I went through the exact same thing in my old house built in 1890. Everything had potential, and even the plumbing (galvanized) was hot depending on what switch was on of off. The panel was 30A and half the house was K&T, the other half armored cable. I worked with a friend who is a licensed master in three states, and when we were done every inch of wiring had been removed and replaced.

The initial run was from the panel the full length of the house using 1.5" EMT and #12 THNN with junction boxes every 6 feet. The run ended at the soon to be demolished section of the house with an additional 10 circuits available (which have since been used). Separate circuit for everything and most rooms have there two 20A circuits running to them. Since then I've added an expansion panel and manual switch for the generator. We planned for 20 years, it's been over 30 years with no issues, except one, which is flickering hall lights that I've just noticed. Very subtle flicker and very hard to notice, but it's there, and I'll have to find out why.
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BOSTON STRONG........
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I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Bob Leonard

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2015, 08:39:24 am »

Yeah, planning on the manual interlock for the genny. It will be good to get all those stacked breakers out of the old box. I can also drop in a feed to a new sub-panel in the garage at the same time.

I bought and installed a Reliance kit. everything you need in one box. Very good quality and from box to back of house took about two (2) hours to install. All I've had to do is buy an extension for the included 20 house to generator cable. It's been put to use more than once and everything works just fine.


http://www.reliancecontrols.com/ProductDetail.aspx?31406CDK

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BOSTON STRONG........
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I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Frank DeWitt

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2015, 09:56:16 am »

My first house came with a two circuit fuse box. One for a single outlet in each room downstairs  and one for a single wall sconce upstairs.

I put in a 150 amp service and a new panel and installed about 5 duplex outlets next to the panel. I ran extension cords to places that needed more power like the kitchen and anywhere I was using power tools.  As each room was remodeled the plaster was torn out, insulation and new wiring back to the panel put in and then drywall. It took a couple of years to rewire the whole house. 

I learned my lesson. remodeling is HARD  when we moved I built new. Much quicker and easier.  6 months from brake ground to move in. 
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Tom Bourke

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2015, 11:46:45 am »

My first house came with a two circuit fuse box. One for a single outlet in each room downstairs  and one for a single wall sconce upstairs.

I put in a 150 amp service and a new panel and installed about 5 duplex outlets next to the panel. I ran extension cords to places that needed more power like the kitchen and anywhere I was using power tools.  As each room was remodeled the plaster was torn out, insulation and new wiring back to the panel put in and then drywall. It took a couple of years to rewire the whole house. 

I learned my lesson. remodeling is HARD  when we moved I built new. Much quicker and easier.  6 months from brake ground to move in.
We had a similar situation in the house we bought.  Existing wiring was impossible to make safe.  I pulled all the fuses and wired in a small stage distro.  Band stringers for the down stairs and the FOH run went up stairs.  That held us for a few months as we waited for the 80+ year old building inspector to remember to come over and approve the new 200A service.  I would call once a week and have to explain who I was and what I needed.

It still took years of remodelling hell to finish that house.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2015, 12:11:40 pm »

I wish I could have remodeled. We didn't paint walls, we tore them down. Nothing was square, nothing done right, and the newspaper insulation told it's own story. Papers went from late 1800's to about 1923, and pulling them out was just like pulling horse hair lath. Just finished rebuilding the front porch, which I started before my heart attack in August. The tools, saws, ladders, etc. are still on the porch and I don't have the energy or time to put them away. Sad.
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BOSTON STRONG........
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I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Chris Hindle

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2015, 02:25:47 pm »

Just finished rebuilding the front porch, which I started before my heart attack in August. The tools, saws, ladders, etc. are still on the porch and I don't have the energy or time to put them away. Sad.
Bob, look at it this way. A lot of folks here are quite happy you didn't join the Great Gig in the Sky.
In late June, i had a kidney transplant. Shit takes a lot longer to get done than it used to. It's getting better, back full time at work, but still, a lot of recovery to go.
Don't be hard on yourself. Recover and grow.
Chris.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2015, 10:25:53 pm »

Thanks Chris.
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BOSTON STRONG........
Proud Vietnam Veteran

I did a gig for Otis Elevator once. Like every job, it had it's ups and downs.

Chris Hindle

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2015, 08:43:39 am »

Thanks Chris.
Your welcome Bob.
I've had to learn new ways of doing old things. Also, my "fuse" is a LOT longer these days  ;D

Just continue getting better.
Chris.
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Ya, Whatever. Just throw a '57 on it, and get off my stage.

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Re: baseboard electric heat
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2015, 08:43:39 am »


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