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Author Topic: A/V wireless transmission  (Read 2610 times)

Bill Beach

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A/V wireless transmission
« on: October 10, 2015, 02:00:20 am »

can anyone give me a recommendation for a good unit (package) to transmit HDMI wirelessly about 300 feet to the next building.
if there is capability of adding another receiver in the future that would be ideal.
thank you
PS roofers tore out the coaxial I did have in place.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2015, 02:03:31 am by Bill Beach »
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2015, 12:02:54 am »

Bill, is there any way to get a physical connection between buildings? Many HDMI extenders are fairly capable over that distance and CAT6 cable is not terribly expensive (it might already be run).

Fiber is a better option, in my opinion, with wireless as a last resort.

If sync/timing with the original source isn't crucial, then you could explore Video over IP solutions that can use a pre-existing wifi setup.


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Jordan Wolf
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"We want our sound to go into the soul of the audience, and see if it can awaken some little thing in their minds... Cause there are so many sleeping people." - Jimi Hendrix

John Rutirasiri

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2015, 10:53:16 am »

Teredek Bolt Pro 600
http://teradek.com/pages/bolt

Sit down when you see the price.  I would rent it if it's a one-time use.  Couple hundred dollars a day.

When I have to go that distance, I convert HDMI to SDI and run Belden 1694 coax with a distribution amp/reclocker every 300ft.

Best,
John R.
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ClearImpact Sound & Event Services, Inc.
Sound/Lighting/Corporate A/V

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Bill Beach

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2015, 12:11:41 am »

Bill, is there any way to get a physical connection between buildings? Many HDMI extenders are fairly capable over that distance and CAT6 cable is not terribly expensive (it might already be run).  building built in 70's, no wiring of that type, but Cat5 can be run (I suggest Cat5 only because I have a bunch that could be used for this)

Fiber is a better option, in my opinion, with wireless as a last resort.

If sync/timing with the original source isn't crucial, then you could explore Video over IP solutions that can use a pre-existing wifi setup.  sync/timing not crucial, but the current wifi doesn't go that far, barely makes it to the back of the building -- about 75 feet.


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Bill Beach

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2015, 01:42:54 am »

Fiber is a better option, in my opinion, with wireless as a last resort.
being as fiber is a better option, I did some looking around and came across these options;
E-More® LKV378 HD 1080P Video Processing HDMI Extender Over Optic Fiber Up To 20KM Transmitter and Receiver
E-More® DT200 HDMI Optic Fiber Extender 20Km with IR and 1080P HD-Video Over Optic-Fiber Transmitter and Receiver

we have the capability to run a fiber cable from our main seating building to the hall behind it in a concealed manner.
for the other building (youth building) in question, we don't have that option -- however we do have Cat5 run from the front of the main building to the youth building.  wondering if it would make any sense (or just complicate things) to run HDMI over fiber optic from the back of the main building to the front (to keep the HDMI signal from degradation - about 100 feet) and then using baluns to run the HDMI through the Cat5 to the youth building (about additional 300 feet).  kind of a lot of rigmarole but also the cards we have been dealt.
please give any insight/advice.
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Jordan Wolf

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2015, 11:46:02 am »

Check out units from Atlona, Extron, Kramer, Gefen, Magenta Research, etc.

They make many that accept fiber and shouldn't break the bank of fiber is actually an option.


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Jordan Wolf
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"We want our sound to go into the soul of the audience, and see if it can awaken some little thing in their minds... Cause there are so many sleeping people." - Jimi Hendrix

Bill Beach

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2015, 01:15:44 am »

Pastor asked me and I couldn't answer....
surveillance cameras (to my knowledge) use coaxial cable oftentimes for very great distances and produce a good clear picture with very little degradation. 
my experience with composite video ran over coaxial cable produced a less than desirable picture.
I think he may be trying to save some money for something we don't use real often, but when it is needed, it is totally needed!  and sometimes with very little prior notice.
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Steve Alves

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2015, 11:01:37 am »

We use http://www.matrox.com/graphics/en/products/video_over_ip/maevex/

One encoder and a decoder at each location. Uses Cat5/6
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Steven Alves
South Florida Sound, Fort Lauderdale, FL
www.southfloridasound.com

TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: A/V wireless transmission
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2015, 11:04:43 am »

Pastor asked me and I couldn't answer....
surveillance cameras (to my knowledge) use coaxial cable oftentimes for very great distances and produce a good clear picture with very little degradation. 
my experience with composite video ran over coaxial cable produced a less than desirable picture.
I think he may be trying to save some money for something we don't use real often, but when it is needed, it is totally needed!  and sometimes with very little prior notice.
Old security cameras are analog video which can travel a long way.  Newer ones are either Ethernet or SDI/HD-SDI.  HDMI is not a long-distance protocol.   

At our church we are using a Canon camcorder with HD-SDI out over 250' of RG6Q coax to an Aja HD-SDI -> DVI converter box.  The converter box was about $600 and it works great.  Both audio and video are transported.
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