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Author Topic: Meyer horizontal symmetry  (Read 1707 times)

Alberto Escrina

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Meyer horizontal symmetry
« on: September 29, 2015, 12:57:15 pm »

Hi guys,
Does anybody knows if Leo, Lyon or Leopard Meyer systems also apply low pass filters to one of the low frequency drivers in order to avoid unwanted side lobes on mid range as they do in their M line models?
I'm trying to deduce if they are acoustically symmetrical in the horizontal plane at close distances or not.
Thank you!
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Alberto Escriña
R&D for STS Sound Touring Systems
Buenos Aires,
Argentina

Hayden J. Nebus

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Re: Meyer horizontal symmetry
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2015, 01:05:49 pm »

Hi guys,
Does anybody knows if Leo, Lyon or Leopard Meyer systems also apply low pass filters to one of the low frequency drivers in order to avoid unwanted side lobes on mid range as they do in their M line models?
I'm trying to deduce if they are acoustically symmetrical in the horizontal plane at close distances or not.
Thank you!

MAPP could probably tell you.
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Dan Mortensen

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Re: Meyer horizontal symmetry
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2015, 02:49:14 pm »

Hi guys,
Does anybody knows if Leo, Lyon or Leopard Meyer systems also apply low pass filters to one of the low frequency drivers in order to avoid unwanted side lobes on mid range as they do in their M line models?
I'm trying to deduce if they are acoustically symmetrical in the horizontal plane at close distances or not.
Thank you!

While I can't say for sure, but since they do that on every other one of their products with multiple LF drivers and have for at least 15 or 20 years in order to successfully avoid the problem you name, one would think that it is a feature on these models, too.

And not just in the M line; also in the Ultra series with UPM. That *may* have been where they used it first, so however long those have been out.

Sorry to not be more definitive, though.
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Alberto Escrina

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Re: Meyer horizontal symmetry
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2015, 07:14:27 pm »

In fact, the distance between acoustic centers of the loudspeakers have been reduced on these series mounting them behind the horn and not at the sides like on the M series. This change might make not necessary to low pass one of them. Besides, on the previous designs description, they claimed to do that. Now they don't say anything. That makes me think those speakers are working in the same passband and the crossover frequency with the compression driver was set as low as possible.
If this is the case, the close field horizontal dispersion should be symmetrical unlike the older ones.
Thank you for your answer anyway.
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Alberto Escriña
R&D for STS Sound Touring Systems
Buenos Aires,
Argentina

Dan Mortensen

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Re: Meyer horizontal symmetry
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2015, 06:34:14 pm »

In fact, the distance between acoustic centers of the loudspeakers have been reduced on these series mounting them behind the horn and not at the sides like on the M series. This change might make not necessary to low pass one of them. Besides, on the previous designs description, they claimed to do that. Now they don't say anything. That makes me think those speakers are working in the same passband and the crossover frequency with the compression driver was set as low as possible.
If this is the case, the close field horizontal dispersion should be symmetrical unlike the older ones.
Thank you for your answer anyway.

Hi Alberto,

You are right, the speakers are indeed working together in the same passband. I finally got a reply from Meyer Support with a paper from John Meyer that says the LF driver mounting is an innovative design that lets both drivers operate up to 500Hz, where the HF driver takes over. There are some other unspecified tricky things happening to allow the horn to not get in the way of the LF drivers at their upper limit.

Thanks for raising the issue and getting me to learn more about this cool speaker system, which I haven't yet heard.
Dan
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