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Frequency Coordination video example

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Neil White:

--- Quote from: Pete Erskine on August 29, 2015, 11:05:35 AM ---So use tripple beat IM when selecting frequencies which will be actively combined.  Turn off the triple beat IM when searching for mic freqs since these freqs are not actively combined.

--- End quote ---

Pete,

Assuming that there is enough available spectrum for the number of required frequencies, does calculating for 3 transmitter 3rd order intermodulation for all transmitters, including Mics, produce a more robust overall co-ordination?

Has having the BTR belt pack TX in a separate zone ever caused issues with transient intermod affecting frequencies in the main zone?

Neil

Pete Erskine:

--- Quote from: Neil White on August 29, 2015, 03:08:13 PM ---Assuming that there is enough available spectrum for the number of required frequencies, does calculating for 3 transmitter 3rd order intermodulation for all transmitters, including Mics, produce a more robust overall co-ordination?

--- End quote ---

No  the additional triples have almost no effect on mics transmitters.  Won't hurt and if you get to the point where you run out of freqs, then turn it off.  More of a time saver, not more robust.


--- Quote from: Neil White on August 29, 2015, 03:08:13 PM ---Has having the BTR belt pack TX in a separate zone ever caused issues with transient intermod affecting frequencies in the main zone?

--- End quote ---

Rarely the RX of the beltpack on the base falls on an intermod product of, lets say, and IEM frequency.  Then you will hear the IEM in the BTR but not be able to see it on a SA because it's so low.  Move the RX.  For this reason I try to do it in the same zone as much as possible and then if I have not enough BP TX freqs, I drag the Previously coordinated freqs into another zone and continue to add more. (you will get an error that your coordination is not valid - ignore.)

Choosing BTR Beltpack freqs with just the 3rd order on is sufficient.

Neil White:

--- Quote from: Pete Erskine on August 29, 2015, 04:16:46 PM ---No  the additional triples have almost no effect on mics transmitters.  Won't hurt and if you get to the point where you run out of freqs, then turn it off.  More of a time saver, not more robust.

--- End quote ---

From the video it looks like IAS has global settings for the spacing to avoid 3rd / 3TX 3rd / 5ths intermodulation products, where as Shure WWB6 has this information as part of each equipment profile. What information does IAS track in its equipment profiles? Do you have a default set of values for these parameters that works with most equipment or does it vary with the quality and performance of the systems?

Mac Kerr:

--- Quote from: Neil White on August 29, 2015, 06:10:12 PM ---From the video it looks like IAS has global settings for the spacing to avoid 3rd / 3TX 3rd / 5ths intermodulation products, where as Shure WWB6 has this information as part of each equipment profile. What information does IAS track in its equipment profiles? Do you have a default set of values for these parameters that works with most equipment or does it vary with the quality and performance of the systems?

--- End quote ---
Attached is the edit window for individual hardware profiles. The "Presets" tab just displays all the available frequencies.

Mac

Tom Bourke:
How does IAS compare to wireless workbench for quality?  I have used WWB6 here in Las Vegas and had good results.  Others claim it does not work at all here.  I will admit that some of the set-ups it said would NOT work do.  I attribute that to our wireless being spread out over a very large area.  I normally deal with convention set-ups so I will have lots of rooms/zones with less than 5 microphones in them.

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