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Author Topic: Finding trhe perfect x-over point  (Read 9383 times)

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2015, 09:55:39 pm »

I don't know how low you, or anyone else can sing, but I hear vocals in the subs even with a 100Hz crossover if I don't use aux fed subs. For anyone near the subs it sounds very bad.

Mac

I just did around 90 or a bit below with no problem.
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Tim Weaver

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2015, 10:44:34 pm »

I just did around 90 or a bit below with no problem.

The lead guitar player in my band can hit a solid 60hz on a good night. And I mean SOLID.
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Bullwinkle: This is the amplifier, which amplifies the sound. This is the Preamplifier which, of course, amplifies the pree's.

Jeff Bankston

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2015, 11:00:06 pm »

maybe its the type of crossovers you guys are using and that will make a difference. My Ashlys are 24db/oct. 18db and 12db will allow more to cross into the other drivers due to the shallower slope. i was under the impression that 24db/oct l-r crossovers had become the standard long ago. i wish someone made a 48db/oct active crossover. i knew a speaker builder that made 48db/oct passive crossovers but he retired and dissapeared several years ago.
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Tim Weaver

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #23 on: August 06, 2015, 02:11:55 am »

maybe its the type of crossovers you guys are using and that will make a difference. My Ashlys are 24db/oct. 18db and 12db will allow more to cross into the other drivers due to the shallower slope. i was under the impression that 24db/oct l-r crossovers had become the standard long ago. i wish someone made a 48db/oct active crossover. i knew a speaker builder that made 48db/oct passive crossovers but he retired and dissapeared several years ago.

There are 48db/oct crossovers out there. In fact most of the mid to high-end DSP's will do that.
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Robert Lofgren

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2015, 03:21:32 am »

I assume that there is some low-cut applied since this is vinyl but he has a great deep voice and show off in the end of the song.

http://youtu.be/adoeYmbEC2Q
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2015, 03:37:00 am »

I assume that there is some low-cut applied since this is vinyl but he has a great deep voice and show off in the end of the song.

http://youtu.be/adoeYmbEC2Q
he got pretty low at the end. his voice has some weight to it.
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John L Nobile

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2015, 07:25:18 am »

A true bass vocal will get down to 80 hz while a baritone will go down to 100 hz. I've never worked with a true bass.
Tenors only go down to 130 hz.
This is from a vocal range chart and may only apply to a trained vocalist. Do they still exist?
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2015, 05:04:35 pm »

A true bass vocal will get down to 80 hz while a baritone will go down to 100 hz. I've never worked with a true bass.
Tenors only go down to 130 hz.
This is from a vocal range chart and may only apply to a trained vocalist. Do they still exist?
i dont know but the Oak Ridge Boy singer is the lowest i ever heard. i only listen to the Elvira song they do. I am a rock n roll guy.
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AllenDeneau

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2015, 05:05:09 pm »

WOW, it seems I hadn't been notified of the multitude of additional responses, sorry...

Yes, My system is actually comprised of a Main box with a High and a Low and an additional subwoofer.

130Hz, well, my subs sound like total crap crossed over that high, very floppy and muddy.

As per the manufacturer's specs, they recommend a 90Hz crossover point at a minimum and it sounds pretty good there but I've found that the system gels a bit better when I move the crossover point a bit lower.

Like I said, I'm pretty happy with my setting, I was just wondering if anybody had any tricks they'd like to share to help me get to the best possible crossover point a bit quicker, that's all.
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John L Nobile

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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2015, 10:59:13 am »

i dont know but the Oak Ridge Boy singer is the lowest i ever heard. i only listen to the Elvira song they do. I am a rock n roll guy.

Singer with the Crash Test Dummies is the lowest pop vocalist I can remember hearing. Very nice character in his voice. I'd say that he's a true bass.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1c1j2szXTk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIbcqgXh5-4

I'd be setting my HPF at 80 for this guy.
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Re: Finding trhe perfect x-over point
« Reply #29 on: August 07, 2015, 10:59:13 am »


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