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Author Topic: Tapped Out  (Read 9640 times)

frank kayser

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2015, 10:07:02 am »

We have "back stab" outlets kind of like that.  They suck.  They only use a little spring to bite into the wire.  Run any current on them and they heat up and fail, some times very badly.  I will only use side wire or back wire where the screw clamps down.  Wire nuts are spring loaded as well but they use wire to wire contact and the spring is just to keep that connection from loosening.
Some of the better back-stab outlets actuallly use the side screws connected to a clamp inside - one clamp per pair - and are actually quite secure.  I agree about the spring load back-stab - don't trust 'em, and they also score/nick the wire which I've seen becone a failure point.
frank
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2015, 11:11:33 am »

We have "back stab" outlets kind of like that.  They suck.  They only use a little spring to bite into the wire.

I don't think I would use them.  I don't use push fit plumbing fittings either.


Steve.
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frank kayser

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #32 on: August 01, 2015, 12:48:23 pm »

I don't think I would use them.  I don't use push fit plumbing fittings either.


Steve.
My experience is VERY limited - my plumber showed me the Shark Bite push-on fittings. They do work easily, and seem well designed. Great for places where one just can't get the propane torch. (torch in English is flashlight - so Steve, what do they call a propane soldering torch  on that side of the pond...)
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Jeff Carter

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2015, 02:04:11 pm »

My experience is VERY limited - my plumber showed me the Shark Bite push-on fittings. They do work easily, and seem well designed. Great for places where one just can't get the propane torch. (torch in English is flashlight - so Steve, what do they call a propane soldering torch  on that side of the pond...)

The other nice thing about Shark Bites is that if you have to, you can push a valve on while the water is pouring out full bore. I changed the main shutoff valve in my basement a couple of years ago that way, though my brother (who's a plumber) cringed a little when I told him the story afterward.
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Mothers, don't let your babies grow up to be physics PhDs

Steve M Smith

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2015, 02:29:56 pm »

My experience is VERY limited - my plumber showed me the Shark Bite push-on fittings. They do work easily, and seem well designed. Great for places where one just can't get the propane torch. (torch in English is flashlight - so Steve, what do they call a propane soldering torch  on that side of the pond...)

Gas torch.

In my last house, I had one push fit connector... in the roof... and it let go of the pipe when I wasn't there.

(I think you meant flashlight in English is torch).


Steve.
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Daniel Levi

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2015, 02:40:14 pm »

A propane torch in England is generally called a blowtorch.

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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2015, 03:46:30 pm »

Does your wiring have multi strand conductors?  Ours are solid copper which I don't think would work with wire nuts.



Push fit connectors are becoming popular here.  They used to be used internally in light fittings and some other equipment.

https://www.connexbox.com/index.php?source=adwords&gclid=CODDlOjxh8cCFaPnwgodxWMGDw


Steve.
stranded wire is illegal to connect to a 15a U ground outet unless it has spade connectors crimped on it and we dont use stranded except for motors. we use #12 solid wire for recepticals on commercial jobs. #12 is the minimum size allowed on commercial jobs. i dont do house wiring but all of it is #14 or #12 romex solid wire. when #10 stranded and larger is used crimp on connectors are used if the outlet doesnt have a hole with a clamp that clamps down on the wire. wire nuts work exelent with solid and stranded wire. the best thing about wire nuts is they squeeze the wire very tight and it will not loosen. wire nuts are as good as a solder joint. hand held torches became obsolete for soldering building wire in the 70's.
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Rob Spence

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2015, 04:20:10 pm »

One wire per screw is fine, and if the device has a clamping plate, each screw has facilities for two wires. Passing the hot and neutral on to the next device using these means is standard procedure.  Ground wires require pigtails and a wire nut, however, as there is only one ground screw per device.

Current code (as 2008 residential ) doesn't permit wire nuts on grounds. They have to be twisted and crimped.


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« Last Edit: August 01, 2015, 04:25:42 pm by Rob Spence »
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #38 on: August 01, 2015, 10:59:09 pm »

Iowa inspectors do require a "pressure connector" on grounds-but wire nuts are acceptable and UL listed for the purpose.

At a continuing ed class as state inspector, when asked about using crimp on connectors for stranded wire on receptacles argued that the receptacles are "listed" for use with stranded or solid wire-not with spade connectors.

Just depends on the AHJ as to what you can do. Lacking the presence of an AHJ, everyone has their preference. I almost always pull stranded wire in conduit, but a fair amount of commercial wiring in this area uses MC cable.  I did some work for a Bible camp close to me that is owned by a church from the Chicago area.  When we built some new cabins, code allowed us to use romex to wire them-but the electricians (licensed and experienced) from their church did not know the proper methods for running romex, since everything in their area (including residential) is required to use emt/conduit.

Like most materials, wire nuts work great when properly applied.
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Steve Swaffer

Jeff Bankston

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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2015, 01:14:16 am »

Iowa inspectors do require a "pressure connector" on grounds-but wire nuts are acceptable and UL listed for the purpose.

At a continuing ed class as state inspector, when asked about using crimp on connectors for stranded wire on receptacles argued that the receptacles are "listed" for use with stranded or solid wire-not with spade connectors.


In Los Angeles the dept of building and safety requires spades to be used with stranded on recepticals that I call Type One. There is no way to keep all the strands under the screw head and properly tighten it.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2015, 01:18:05 am by Jeff Bankston »
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Re: Tapped Out
« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2015, 01:14:16 am »


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