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Author Topic: Overseas Power Board  (Read 8295 times)

Steve M Smith

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2015, 03:38:45 pm »

It is only rated at 15A through each of the face connections. A device with a 15A plug is not supposed to draw more than 15A

This is why I like our system with a fuse in every plug (although there's nothing to stop someone putting a 13A fuse in when a 3A would be more suitable).

The advantage is that it doesn't matter how many multi way adaptors you connect up, you could have hundreds of things connected to a single outlet, if the load exceeds 13A the fuse will blow.


Steve.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2015, 04:21:48 pm »


Same with the women here

Sent from my XT1030 using Tapatalk

Now THAT'S the kind of topic swerve I'm talking about. 8)  Luckily I run a loose ship...
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2015, 06:07:55 pm »


(For those outside the United States, "spec grade" refers to a commercial-quality device that generally meets military specifications; sometimes also called "mil-spec". I'm slowly replacing the "residential grade" receptacles in my own home with spec-grade ones because they provide a better connection and are more durable.)

Most commercial/industrial receptacles are not tamper resistant-TR are now code required in homes.  IMO, a better solution would be to use a quality resi grade receptacle-I prefer Leviton, P&S also seem to be good.  TR offers improved safety-especially with toddlers around-they won't be able to copy mom & dad and stick something in the "keyhole".

IF a system is installed according to code, breakers will protect the building wiring regardless of the load that is connected.  Fuses are no longer acceptable for new wiring for just that reason-it is too easy to install a bigger  one when it is not safe.  Fuses in plugs would make sense-plugging a 16 or 18 gauge extension cord into a 15 or 20 amp circuit then plugging in one of these TV advertised "super-efficient" heaters is any easy way to start a fire.  But the fuse holders need to reject oversize fuses to really be effective.  The same person that will use an undersize cord will have no qualms in using an oversize fuse.

What I don't understand is the European and/or Australian use of odd capacities-13 amp/32 amp etc.  I know calculators are everywhere, and maybe I am just mentally lazy, but I find it much easier to derate and figure allowable load for "continuous" etc when I am dealing with multiples of 5 or 10.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2015, 08:56:20 pm »

What I don't understand is the European and/or Australian use of odd capacities-13 amp/32 amp etc.  I know calculators are everywhere, and maybe I am just mentally lazy, but I find it much easier to derate and figure allowable load for "continuous" etc when I am dealing with multiples of 5 or 10.
Quickly grabbing my calculator, I see that 13 amps times 230 volts equals pretty close to 3,000 watts. Could that be the reason for the seemingly oddball numbers. Do the Brits and Aussie's know something we don't know in the US?
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Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2015, 09:55:57 pm »

Quickly grabbing my calculator, I see that 13 amps times 230 volts equals pretty close to 3,000 watts. Could that be the reason for the seemingly oddball numbers. Do the Brits and Aussie's know something we don't know in the US?

Yes, they do; but even on a loosely-run ship I'll hold those thoughts to myself.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2015, 01:20:50 am »

Quickly grabbing my calculator, I see that 13 amps times 230 volts equals pretty close to 3,000 watts. Could that be the reason for the seemingly oddball numbers. Do the Brits and Aussie's know something we don't know in the US?
No as it was originally 240 volts until will dropped to 230 volts to be in line with the rest of Europe. 240 x 13 = 3120.

Before we had the 13A BS1363 plug, we had three round pin plugs in domestic use rated at 3A, 5A and 15A.  These were not fused.  The 15A round pin plug remains in use for theatre lighting.

Our industrial connectors follow a strange pattern of current rating.  They are 16A, 32A, 63A and 125A.  It would have made more sense for the last two to be 64A and 128A.

Yes, they do; but even on a loosely-run ship I'll hold those thoughts to myself.
And that!


Steve.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2015, 01:33:18 am »

Do the Brits and Aussie's know something we don't know in the US?

It must be metric electricity.
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Stop confusing the issue with facts and logic!

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2015, 01:41:50 am »

Most commercial/industrial receptacles are not tamper resistant-TR are now code required in homes.  IMO, a better solution would be to use a quality resi grade receptacle-I prefer Leviton, P&S also seem to be good.  TR offers improved safety-especially with toddlers around-they won't be able to copy mom & dad and stick something in the "keyhole".

Since we just adopted our first child (an infant girl), I have identified some commercial grade tamper-resistant receptacles I plan to order and install.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004YK6HSQ
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #18 on: July 16, 2015, 02:35:21 am »

It must be metric electricity.
In the UK we don't use metric as much as you think we do.

All road signs are in miles, yards and miles per hour and those of us above a certain age use feet and inches.
I use metric for engineering drawings but imperial if I am doing some work on a house.
As the inventors of the imperial system, we are not going to give it up that easily!
 
Since we just adopted our first child (an infant girl), I have identified some commercial grade tamper-resistant receptacles I plan to order and install.
Another advantage of our sockets and plugs is the safety aspect especially with regard to children.  The live and neutral apertures have shutters over them which move out of the way when the earth pin is inserted.  The earth pin is slightly longer so the shutters move out of the way just as the live and neutral pins get inserted.  This prevents children from sticking things into the socket.
 


And a switch as an added bonus!

The longer earth pin also ensures the appliance is earthed when the plug is not inserted all the way.  It is the first pin to make contact and the last to disconnect.

And on the subject of the plug not being inserted all the way, the live and neutral pins have a plastic sleeve so if the plug is only half way in, little fingers feeling round behind the plug cannot get electrocuted.

 
Steve.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2015, 07:44:30 am by Steve M Smith »
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David Buckley

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2015, 07:33:03 am »

The longer live pin also ensures the appliance is earthed when the plug is not inserted all the way.  It is the first pin to make contact and the last to disconnect.
I believe you mean the longer earth pin :)

The picture illustrates a shuttered socket with the shutters opened by means of the earth pin.  A mechanism that can be defeated by using a screwdriver to get your test prods in the live and neutral holes.  An even better arrangement doesn't use the earth pin to open the shutters, but demands equal force from the plug pins onto the shutters whereupon they then open.  Unequal force - no go.  These sockets are far more resistant to inadvertent opening.

 
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #19 on: July 16, 2015, 07:33:03 am »


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