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Author Topic: Overseas Power Board  (Read 6751 times)

Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2015, 01:44:14 pm »

"Hard-use" is how hard, seems like a bit of overkill. Here it is on the Legrand website, wasn't immediately obvious.
https://www.legrand.us/passandseymour/receptacles/fed-spec-grade/hard-use-tamper-resistant/tr5262w.aspx#res

Not sure what the "CP6" at the end refers to.   Note the "upside down" picture though - does legrand endorse the somewhat common practice of putting the ground on top so if the cover plate (which is usually metal in hard-use areas) comes loose and falls off it makes contact with the plug's pin in ground first?
There's no picture of the back:
Residential duplex sockets usually have the ground screw at the bottom, so if this socket has the ground screw at the top, the wiring behind the socket might need some extra twists.   Older houses have very small and crowded workboxes behind the duplex.

Re: the back of the receptacle; the feature list includes "Internal screw-pressure-plate back and side wire capability." I'm interpreting that to mean it's the kind where you stick the wire in the back and tighten down the screw; I think that is a superior method to even wrapping the wire around the screw, especially if you are using stranded wire.

My house was gutted then rewired by an electrician in 1996 (previous homeowners suffered a fire which required a complete remodel). So all of the boxes are the plastic nail-on boxes, which have plenty of room. The few that I've opened up have plenty of length on the wire, so it should be no problem orienting the receptacle one way or the other. If a wire does prove to be too short, there should be sufficient space to pigtail it.

Hard use? I'm convinced that residential receptacles actually get harder use than commercial receptacles (except for the ones used for vacuum cleaners), especially in the kitchen.

Sorry, didn't mean to hijack the thread, but everybody else is doing it, too!
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2015, 02:02:28 pm »

Another advantage of our sockets and plugs is the safety aspect especially with regard to children.  The live and neutral apertures have shutters over them which move out of the way when the earth pin is inserted.  The earth pin is slightly longer so the shutters move out of the way just as the live and neutral pins get inserted.  This prevents children from sticking things into the socket.

And a switch as an added bonus!

The longer earth pin also ensures the appliance is earthed when the plug is not inserted all the way.  It is the first pin to make contact and the last to disconnect.

And on the subject of the plug not being inserted all the way, the live and neutral pins have a plastic sleeve so if the plug is only half way in, little fingers feeling round behind the plug cannot get electrocuted.

The TR receptacles in the US (which I believe are now required by NEC in new residential constructions) have shutters over the live (hot) and neutral (groundED) slots. The shutters cannot be moved unless equal pressure is exerted on both simultaneously. Using the groundING pin to open the shutters doesn't work here, due to the large installed base of two-prong plugs. Every table lamp and double-insulated appliance uses only a two-prong plug.

I do wish, however, that our plugs had the insulated sleeves on the back part of the prongs like yours do.

For our three-prong plugs, the earth (groundING) pin is longer. But the quality of most plugs is so poor (thanks, China!) that the earth pin is easily broken off.

On a side trail of this side trail, it's interesting to note the difference in terminology between the UK and the US (and the NEC):

Quote
UK vernacular=US vernacular=National Electrical Code terminology
---------
Live=Hot=Current Carrying Conductor
Neutral=Neutral=Grounded current carrying conductor -- but doesn't really exist as such in the UK, does it?
Earth=Ground=Equipment Grounding Conductor (EGC)

The National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) did not even define "Neutral conductor" until the 2008 edition of the code, and at least one interpretation of the definition says that on a 120V circuit single-phase circuit, what's called 'neutral' in the vernacular isn't even neutral:
http://www.ecmag.com/section/codes-standards/neutral-or-not
« Last Edit: July 16, 2015, 03:39:25 pm by Jonathan Johnson »
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2015, 02:11:51 pm »


Sorry, didn't mean to hijack the thread, but everybody else is doing it, too!

"Everything rises and falls on leadership"!!
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Steve Swaffer

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Overseas Power Board
« Reply #32 on: July 16, 2015, 02:11:51 pm »


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