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Author Topic: Soviet Rotary Switches  (Read 14422 times)

Mike Sokol

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #60 on: July 23, 2015, 07:35:56 pm »

You need a porcelain or bakelite/phenolic edison-base fuse holder to install in the incoming hot/live line.
Now I'm really going down the rabbit hole. Take a look at this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/10x-VINTAGE-USSR-Military-Bakelite-Fuse-Holder-6x30-Silver-NEW-/191105768125

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Mike Sokol
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #61 on: July 23, 2015, 11:26:23 pm »

Can you get fuses for them?

Also, I would verify the operation of the GFCI-especially since you are intentionally creating a potentially hazardous situation.  Some time ago there was a problem with Chinese clones of breakers that were merely a switch.  Not to be pessimistic-just cautious.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #62 on: July 24, 2015, 06:51:40 am »

Can you get fuses for them?
I already looked, and 6mm x 30mm fuses are very common.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/301231431663?lpid=82&chn=ps
Quote
Also, I would verify the operation of the GFCI-especially since you are intentionally creating a potentially hazardous situation.  Some time ago there was a problem with Chinese clones of breakers that were merely a switch.  Not to be pessimistic-just cautious.
That's good intel. I'll do a quick test to make sure it trips with a 6 mA fault current. Note that I'm using non-conductive boxes for everything, and even a nylon screw to attach the receptacle cover. You are correct that this FUBARator can certainly create very dangerous outlet conditions, so I'm taking every safety precaution I can think of. 
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Mike Sokol
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #63 on: July 27, 2015, 03:37:13 pm »

I've metered the rotary switch over the weekend and confirmed that it's break-before-make. It's a 4-pole / 5-throw configuration, and works beautifully. As you can see from the picture, there's brass center screw with a tapered index notch on the shaft and phenolic knob. Of course, there's no real documentation but it's pretty simple to sort out.

So here's the question. I'm going to have 5 different switch positions that will be matrixed out to the 3 receptacle contacts of Hot, Neutral, and Ground. H for Hot, N for Neutral and G for Ground seems obvious. But I also want to have O for Open and "something" for ghost voltage leakage with maybe a 100K resistor to the incoming Hot. I don't want to use L for Leakage since that could also be L for Line. And I can't use G for Ghost Voltage since that's also G for Ground. Maybe R for resistive hookup?

Again, this is going to have 3 rotary switches in a row with 5 positions each. And each rotary switch will have its center tap connected to the Hot, Neutral or Ground contact of the test receptacle/outlet. There will also be a master On/Off switch with an incoming fuse and indicator light to show that it's one and sending "something" to the remote test receptacle.

Hot    Neutral    Ground

 H          H            H
 N          N            N
 G          G            G
 O          O            O
 R          R             R

Does that configuration make sense? Are these letters confusing to anyone out there who speaks a different language? Is HNGOR a bad word in any language you can think of?

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Mike Sokol
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #64 on: July 27, 2015, 10:49:02 pm »

O is OK, also P hantom or F loating  might be a better.  Also, maybe a small transformer with power to one side of the primary and the other disconnected, then the secondary having one lead floating and one connected to the switch position might better simulate inductive/capacitive coupling that creates a "ghost-phantom-floating" voltage?  A 100k or 10 meg resistor with no load or only a high impedance DMM for a load is going to read a solid 120 VAC.
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Tom Bourke

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #65 on: July 27, 2015, 11:01:37 pm »

Maybe add a 4th switch with various failures, capacitor, resistor, the open winding transformer light bulb or others?
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #66 on: July 27, 2015, 11:37:32 pm »

O is OK, also P hantom or F loating  might be a better. 
Now that I think about it, maybe this should be a small value stinger cap instead of a resistor. With a high-z voltmeter it will read 120 volts, but a low-z meter will drag the voltage down to a smaller value, maybe 30 or 40 volts. That's pretty much what happens when open wiring couples to other conductors in a common run.
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Mike Sokol
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #67 on: July 28, 2015, 12:05:31 pm »

Again, this is going to have 3 rotary switches in a row with 5 positions each. And each rotary switch will have its center tap connected to the Hot, Neutral or Ground contact of the test receptacle/outlet. There will also be a master On/Off switch with an incoming fuse and indicator light to show that it's one and sending "something" to the remote test receptacle.

Hot    Neutral    Ground

 H          H            H
 N          N            N
 G          G            G
 O          O            O
 R          R             R

Does that configuration make sense? Are these letters confusing to anyone out there who speaks a different language? Is HNGOR a bad word in any language you can think of?

How about throwing in some 208 or 240V just for kicks?
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #68 on: July 28, 2015, 03:51:44 pm »

How about throwing in some 208 or 240V just for kicks?
I've considered doing the 240-volt fail option, but think it's too dangerous for Version 1. But you are correct that 240-volt mis-wiring is a potential fail. Once I get the first version of the Fubarulator (????) built, maybe I'll build version 2 with the 240-volt option. Would be kinda fun. 8)
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Mike Sokol
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Soviet Rotary Switches
« Reply #69 on: July 29, 2015, 01:14:39 pm »


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