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Author Topic: Sparky Language Lesson  (Read 9135 times)

Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2015, 11:24:37 pm »

I recently discovered that while the Hubbell CS6364/6365 series devices only accept up to 6 AWG, the Leviton version accepts 4 AWG. For longer runs, other than cost and weight, it seems like 4 AWG wire would be the way to go. Am I missing anything?

Edit: correct Hubbell wire size. Doh!
« Last Edit: June 26, 2015, 12:48:02 am by Mark Cadwallader »
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Rob Spence

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2015, 11:57:49 pm »

"50A 120/240v split (aka single) phase, 3 wires plus ground, terminated to Hubbell CS6369 or to lugs in a fused disconnect switch."

When you specify 120/240v service it requires (or at least infers) that the 2 hot legs are 180 apart, with the center tap acting as Neutral.

While I like Hubbell, I would not restrict it. There are other brands I like better but as long as it meets the CS6369 spec, I don't much care.


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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2015, 03:17:02 am »

i'm a commercial electrician. just ask for lugs for the wire gauge you need. For 50 amp ask for #6 lugs. #8 will work but its easier to put it in the larger #6 hole.
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Timothy J. Trace

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #23 on: June 26, 2015, 10:07:20 am »

50A 120/240v split (aka single) phase, 3 wires plus ground, terminated within 125' of the stage to CS6369 or #6 lugs in an overload-protected disconnect switch.

How's that look to your experienced eyes?
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Frank Koenig

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #24 on: June 26, 2015, 10:26:52 am »

I note that the various posters used 110, 120 and 125 (and the associated double).

As far as I know, 110 has fallen out of common usage and while NEMA identifies connectors as 125/250, the most seen usage seems to be 120/240.

Comments?

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I agree. I find it strange how "110 Volts" just won't go away. Even stranger is how (on electric vehicle forums, in particular) I often see "110V" right next to "240V".

While we're on terminology, "split-phase" has no meaning in the world of power. There is single-phase and three-phase and that's it. Some services offer multiple voltages by virtue of being derived from transformer windings that are tapped, and sometimes the center taps are grounded. It's still single-phase.

Split-phase refers to a starting strategy used in certain single-phase induction motors in which a second "starting" winding that has a different inductance and resistance from the main winding is engaged by a centrifugal switch during start in order to provide the necessary rotating field.

-F
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Frank DeWitt

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2015, 10:42:06 am »

I agree. I find it strange how "110 Volts" just won't go away. Even stranger is how (on electric vehicle forums, in particular) I often see "110V" right next to "240V".
-F

OK I know it was 110 (That was Edisons standard.  Now it is 120 or 125  but who said?  who is in charge? When did it change? why.

BTW  In the beginning Edison set out some goals.  He wanted bulbs as bright as good residential gas lighting (because that was what he planned to compete against.)  He decided that that would require 100 watts.  He felt that 1 amp per lamp would allow for reasonable wiring so that meant 100 volts He added 10 volts to take care of losses and we got 110 volts.

At the time there was already some wiring in cities, both for telegraph and for arc street lighting.  Te street lighting voltage was very high.



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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2015, 11:01:26 am »

i'm a commercial electrician. just ask for lugs for the wire gauge you need. For 50 amp ask for #6 lugs. #8 will work but its easier to put it in the larger #6 hole.

If you are using portable cord you need at least #6 for 50 amps-in some cases #4 is required. Most lugs for #4 will be fine with #6.
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #27 on: June 26, 2015, 11:07:57 am »

OK I know it was 110 (That was Edisons standard.  Now it is 120 or 125  but who said?  who is in charge? When did it change? why.

BTW  In the beginning Edison set out some goals.  He wanted bulbs as bright as good residential gas lighting (because that was what he planned to compete against.)  He decided that that would require 100 watts.  He felt that 1 amp per lamp would allow for reasonable wiring so that meant 100 volts He added 10 volts to take care of losses and we got 110 volts.

At the time there was already some wiring in cities, both for telegraph and for arc street lighting.  Te street lighting voltage was very high.
I did some research on this a while back.  As you mention, 110v was a historical maximum: 100V + 10% allowable, which was revised in 1954 (ANSI C84) to the current US voltage standard of 120v +/- 5%.  Plugs and receptacles are often rated at 125V/250V, which allows for the high side of the allowable range - i.e. the maximum allowable voltage, not the nominal.  Other oddball voltages like 115 or 117 volts often appear on motors, and this was to indicate the expected voltage at the motor - 120V minus a few volts for distribution wiring.

If you actually measure voltage above 125V, there's either a loose neutral, or a buck/boost transformer that's set too high.  Neither are good situations.
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Timothy J. Trace

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #28 on: June 26, 2015, 11:14:42 am »

If you are using portable cord you need at least #6 for 50 amps-in some cases #4 is required. Most lugs for #4 will be fine with #6.
My cords are #6, 4-wire.

So ... "50A 120/240v split (aka single) phase, 3 wires plus ground, terminated within 125' of the stage to CS6369 or #4 lugs inside an overload-protected disconnect switch."

LOL! So much discussion to get to this, but it seems a good time was had by all ;)    .....and I've learned things in the process. Win.
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TJ (Tom) Cornish

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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2015, 11:22:05 am »

My cords are #6, 4-wire.

So ... "50A 120/240v split (aka single) phase, 3 wires plus ground, terminated within 125' of the stage to CS6369 or #4 lugs inside an overload-protected disconnect switch."

LOL! So much discussion to get to this, but it seems a good time was had by all ;)    .....and I've learned things in the process. Win.
You'll probably be OK with that terminology, but asking with the right words is no guarantee you'll get what you need.  Testing is necessary.  Your #6 cables are fairly commonly used for 50A distribution, however technically they are illegal.  A picky inspector may ding you on that.  For future cable purchases, move up to #4 cabling for 50A.  You'll have less voltage drop, and less to worry about from inspectors.
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Re: Sparky Language Lesson
« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2015, 11:22:05 am »


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