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Author Topic: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s  (Read 13803 times)

Scott Holtzman

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2016, 11:48:45 pm »

Had a GAS preamp (Thalia I think) in the '70-80s until I got my ML7.  Good sounding and well made stuff.  I did bring home an Amber amp to try and it was a bit blurry.  That warm and fuzzy sound similar to late '70s Marantz.

Stephen, trying to remember what an amp sounded like almost 40 years ago is a bit of a challenge.  I am sure my perceptions and expectations have changed.

I doubt the Amber would be considered coherent by Ivan.  I do remember I heard it on a pair of Ohm Walsh speakers.   I also recall I auditioned an Earl Klugh and Supertramp's Crime of the Century.  The guy at the high end stereo shop was really nice to me considering I was barely old enough to drive.  He would wash my records and vacuum them for me and seemed impressed I would bring material I was familiar with to audition the new gear he would get in. 

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Scott AKA "Skyking" Holtzman
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2016, 02:43:46 am »

You weren't kidding.

I just guessed at a weight of 50lbs and it looks like around $400 US from you.

That is a bit more than I am willing to part with.

Maybe the next time you come to the US you can bring it as carry on  ;D ;D ;D

I think your weight guess is about right. It seems to be about the same weight as a CS800 and I think they are 47lbs.

Is there another way such as sending it to Danley Europe?

We have factories in the US.  I will investigate the cost using our courier but I doubt that it will be much different.
 
I could strip out the insides and send an empty shell - but that wouldn't quite be the same as having the amp!


Steve.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2016, 07:38:20 am »


I think your weight guess is about right. It seems to be about the same weight as a CS800 and I think they are 47lbs.

Is there another way such as sending it to Danley Europe?

We have factories in the US.  I will investigate the cost using our courier but I doubt that it will be much different.
 
I could strip out the insides and send an empty shell - but that wouldn't quite be the same as having the amp!


Steve.
I don't care if it works or not (about half of mine don't work)-it is for display only and conversation pieces.

Us old guys LOVE to look at the gear we grew up using and talk about it.

My office is one of the "must sees" during a visit (at least for older sound guys).

It is amazing how many people walk up and start to touch the various amps-turn the level controls and on/off switches.

Something about that just brings back memories.

But I also have a number of "unique" items-such as a Crest 8001, serial #1, a Crown prototype that never made it into production etc.

I like odd stuff like that.  And amps like the Studio Master that people (at least over here) are unaware that were made.

I have the standard Phase Linear collection (400-700-200) but am looking for some of the touring professional amps they made.  They are pretty rare
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2016, 07:44:52 am »

I don't care if it works or not (about half of mine don't work)-it is for display only and conversation pieces.

Us old guys LOVE to look at the gear we grew up using and talk about it.
I'm just about in the old guy category but these amps are a bit before my time in live sound.  I go back as far as CS800s and the HH FET power amplifiers.
 
When I have a bit of spare time I will have a go at stripping out anything superfluous (mainly the transformer) and see what weight it ends up as.  If nothing else, it will give me spares for the other one if I try to get it working.

I haven't actually tried them yet.  I should do that first.  It would be silly to take apart a working one then use its parts to repair a non working one!


Steve.
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Ivan Beaver

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2016, 12:28:59 pm »



I haven't actually tried them yet.  I should do that first.  It would be silly to take apart a working one then use its parts to repair a non working one!


Steve.
Agreed

You could end up with twice as much work-if they actually need repair
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A complex question is easily answered by a simple-easy to understand WRONG answer!

Ivan Beaver
Danley Sound Labs

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Stephen Kirby

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2016, 09:58:10 pm »

Stephen, trying to remember what an amp sounded like almost 40 years ago is a bit of a challenge.  I am sure my perceptions and expectations have changed.

I doubt the Amber would be considered coherent by Ivan.  I do remember I heard it on a pair of Ohm Walsh speakers.   I also recall I auditioned an Earl Klugh and Supertramp's Crime of the Century.  The guy at the high end stereo shop was really nice to me considering I was barely old enough to drive.  He would wash my records and vacuum them for me and seemed impressed I would bring material I was familiar with to audition the new gear he would get in.
No doubt the Mobile Fidelity half speed mastered versions.   :D

I had this old SS Dyna stereo I bought when I moved out and had to trouble shoot with nothing but a schematic from the library and a VOM when it crapped out on me.  When I had more money and bought a pair of Magnepans and the GAS preamp I went looking for a new amp.  The high end dealer at the time would let you take things home.  The Amber didn't sound any better to me than the Dyna.  And as I said, reminded me of the Marantz I was selling at the camera/stereo shop I worked at.  Eventually I found a deal on an used ARC D75 someone had traded in.  When we hooked it up and turned it on the store owner and I looked at each other and he realized he was giving it away.  He grinned when I said I'd take it.  Never a/b'd it with a D76 but it sure sounded glorious.
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2016, 02:17:54 am »


I think your weight guess is about right. It seems to be about the same weight as a CS800 and I think they are 47lbs.

Is there another way such as sending it to Danley Europe?

We have factories in the US.  I will investigate the cost using our courier but I doubt that it will be much different.
 
I could strip out the insides and send an empty shell - but that wouldn't quite be the same as having the amp!


Steve.

Get the guys that left the triceratops in Godshill to move the amplifier.  Should be easy for them.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2016, 02:43:12 am »

Get the guys that left the triceratops in Godshill to move the amplifier.  Should be easy for them.
Good idea.  The owner says it takes five men to move it a few feet so he has no idea how they got it into the road.

No one else here has a clue what we are referring to!!
 
EDIT:  Did you see it on the BBC news?
If anyone cares, in the village of Godshill on the Isle of Wight, a dinosaur based business has a full size fbreglass tricerotops on its land.  One night last week, someone (or more likely lots of people) moved it out into the road, blocking it in both directions.


Steve.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 02:49:19 am by Steve M Smith »
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duane massey

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #38 on: March 02, 2016, 11:13:19 pm »

I noticed the Carlson cabinets in your photo, Ivan. Here's a pic from our set-up in the early 70's. Note the Carlson cabinet in the middle.
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Duane Massey
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Jeff Bankston

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Re: Recording Studio Design power amplifiers from the 1970s
« Reply #39 on: March 03, 2016, 01:10:57 am »

I noticed the Carlson cabinets in your photo, Ivan. Here's a pic from our set-up in the early 70's. Note the Carlson cabinet in the middle.
What PA amps did you have ?
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