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Author Topic: Trussing Question  (Read 1846 times)

Jason Moore

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Trussing Question
« on: May 15, 2015, 12:08:16 am »

I have a client who wants to add 20' by 20' trussing system to their nightclub on 15' vertical truss supports (think trade show booth). The truss won't have much load on it. Heaviest item would be 4 old martin roboscan 812s. Only other lighting would be led par cans and maybe a handful of small movers like adj inno spots.

My question is, should we use square truss or could triangle do the job? We'd really prefer triangle if at all possible for cost reasons. What size bases should we use and how do we attach them to the floor?

Thanks,
Jason
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Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Trussing Question
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2015, 12:38:47 am »

There is nothing inherently wrong with triangle truss, assuming that it otherwise meets the required loading specs with an appropriate margin of safety.  There are a number of grades of truss available. Are you looking at .125" wall truss (3 mm wall thickness), or are you vonsidering light-duty DJ truss (e.g. Global truss, 2mm /.080" walls)?  I am not a structural engineer, but I would not want to trust light-duty truss to drunks trying to climb up the verticals.  I also would not want use conical connectors; bolted, plated truss seems far more secure in that application.

If you have solidly installed threaded anchors of an appropriate size and grade, I suspect that simply bolting through the plated end should be sufficient, and less of a trip hazard. I would want a licensed professional to review and stamp the design of a fixed installation in any case. I respectfully suggest that the venue owner probably needs that assuance in order maintain its public liability insurance. YMMV.
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James Feenstra

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Re: Trussing Question
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2015, 09:52:53 am »

I also would not want use conical connectors; bolted, plated truss seems far more secure in that application.
I would disagree on this point, as the conical coupler system gives you a stronger, better connection that the other methods (pin/fork, bolt, tube) without the bending stress on the gusset plates, which gives you an overall higher load rating.

Granted, you should always check your manufacturers loading tables as there are a lot more factors than connection method that determine what a truss can hold.

Odds of someone being able to unpin the truss while it's under load anyways is slim to none, especially if it's an upright, unless the night club patrons tend to bring hammers with them (as opposed to them just being hammered).

I think your biggest issue will be more preventing people from climbing it than anything

A good reference for trussing/rigging applications is the Prolyte Black Book;
https://www.prolyte.com/en/download-center/blackbooks

I would definitely consult a qualified installer who can provide engineering specs for any structure, especially for insurance reasons
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Cailen Waddell

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Re: Trussing Question
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2015, 07:48:47 pm »

Any reputable truss manufacturer should be happy to help you develop a solution with their product and provide a stamped engineered drawing. 


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Re: Trussing Question
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2015, 07:48:47 pm »


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