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Author Topic: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often  (Read 6992 times)

Ivan Beaver

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2015, 07:51:17 am »

Most of us got into this business as DIY-er's, or at least the "older" group. I have reached the point that I only build something if there is nothing available that will take it's place. I enjoy building things, but not mass-production. I'll leave that to the big guys.
I still build various pieces of electonics/controls etc for testing-demos etc.

Mainly because there is nothing available at any price that will do what I want it to do.  So you HAVE to build it yourself.

And I STILL enjoy that aspect.  There is something that just "takes me back" and gives you pride when it works. :)
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Tom Bourke

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2015, 08:22:33 am »

What software are you using?  I have downloaded and installed Linux CNC.  It is a superbly written and documented piece of software but you do need to run Linux for it to work.
I am running Linux CNC as well.  Most of my computers have linux of one form or another on them.  Been using linux for over 10 years so it was an easy choice for me.  My mill is the MicroMark variant of the sx2.  X,Y, and spindle are under computer control.  I am working on Z but it is slow going.  Most of my free time lately has been spent on building furniture because we could not find what we wanted.
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duane massey

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2015, 11:30:45 am »

I doubt that I could utilize a CNC system for my projects as the pieces I work with tend to be very large. A full-size machine could do the work but not a small one.
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Duane Massey
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Tom Bourke

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2015, 07:02:32 pm »

I doubt that I could utilize a CNC system for my projects as the pieces I work with tend to be very large. A full-size machine could do the work but not a small one.
With any luck by the time I build a CNC for sheet goods I will have enough space and money to build a full size unit.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2015, 02:45:15 am »

The system in the linked video is great.  I would love to have that... actually, I would love to have just the space for it.


Steve.
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Richard Turner

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2015, 10:49:25 am »

I'm guessing a decision was made somewhere to use CNC routering for all sheet stock cutting.

A vertical panel saw would leave a cleaner edge and cut faster. They are available fully automated but then the cut pieces would have to be fed back to the router anyway for cutting holes and chamfering edges....

Guess the bean counters figured out the math.

Also I guess most electronics are still done on 1 sided boards so they are still using a wave solder for the most part

Sure would like to have seen a video from the peavey woodshop from when it was in full production 20-25 years ago
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2015, 11:03:22 am »

I'm guessing a decision was made somewhere to use CNC routering for all sheet stock cutting.

A vertical panel saw would leave a cleaner edge and cut faster. They are available fully automated but then the cut pieces would have to be fed back to the router anyway for cutting holes and chamfering edges....

Guess the bean counters figured out the math.

Also I guess most electronics are still done on 1 sided boards so they are still using a wave solder for the most part

Sure would like to have seen a video from the peavey woodshop from when it was in full production 20-25 years ago
Which wood shop? The cabinet area in the middle of plant 3 used huge panel saws(?) and was hopping, but not extremely automated AFAIK. OTOH Hartley pioneered using CNC machinery in the guitar plant to accurately cut repeatable guitar necks.

The automation of the huge sheet metal machines were pretty impressive, where the fork lift would load in 4x8' stacks of sheet metal and it would slice and dice them down into piles of perfect parts.

JR 

PS: I know a little about DIY, I used to run a kit business back in the '70s
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Steve M Smith

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2015, 11:19:52 am »

Sure would like to have seen a video from the peavey woodshop from when it was in full production 20-25 years ago
I visited the one in England about 25 years ago and it was quite impressive.


Steve.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2015, 11:36:00 am »

I visited the one in England about 25 years ago and it was quite impressive.


Steve.

Corby was a modest operation compared to Plant 3 in Meridian. The plant 3 building was 1/4 mile long. I recall having to walk through the wood shop to get to receiving that was at the opposite end of the building from where my office was. Even with the dust collection systems it was hard to see in the wood area with so much sawdust in the air.

JR

PS: But plant 3 is now open with a skeleton crew. That Undercover Boss episode showed them making some cheap PA cabinets in the wood shop but AFAIK that line is now shut down.
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Steve M Smith

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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2015, 12:58:07 pm »

Yes, the Corby plant was quite modest and the speakers I saw being built were the Eurosys with a fairly simple glued and stapled together rectangular box.  But it was interesting to watch a sheet of wood come in and be turned into a finished cabinet as we watched.  Especially as I had never seen anything like it before.


Steve.
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Re: seeing as homebrew comes up on here most often
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2015, 12:58:07 pm »


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