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Author Topic: Wiring A Stage For AC Power  (Read 6755 times)

Frank Koenig

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2015, 10:07:54 am »

You need to contact your local building inspector to begin the discussion. They should be able to direct you to relevant codes that need to be complied with.

This may sound silly, but I have found the word "guidance" to have magical properties when said to building officials. It appears to be the keyword that says, in effect, I want to know how to do it right but I'm not asking you to engineer the system for me. So, for example, "We're planning to do X and would like some GUIDANCE with respect to local codes." Good luck. --Frank
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #21 on: February 05, 2015, 01:36:30 pm »

As for GFCI location, if the receptacle on the wall is GFCI, the downside is that a trip takes down everybody.  If the Levition GFCIs will work (they really nice!), the a GFCI trip would only shut part of the stage down.  Less interruption-and fewer places to look for a problem.

Yes, remember that ground leakage currents are additive, so several "leaky" pieces of gear on the same GFCI can easily hit the 6mA threshold and trip. But three separate pieces of gear, each leaking 2 or 3 mA to ground on their own GFCI will be fine.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #22 on: February 05, 2015, 04:00:46 pm »

Stage boxes installed in a stage need to be wired as a permanent install, whether the stage is permanent or movable. In the case of a movable stage, you would have a junction box where you transition from "installed" methods (i.e., conduit) to "moveable" methods (i.e., SO with a plug on the end).

On the other hand, stage boxes that are NOT installed permanently, constructed as a stringer, could be wired using SO cord. However, all boxes, clamps, and strain reliefs must be listed for exposed, moveable use and SO-type cord (no "handy boxes" with knockouts that could be accidentally knocked out). The end of the SO must be equipped with a plug; if the source end is hard wired into a junction box then it's no longer considered a moveable installation. It might just be cheaper and easier to buy a premade stringer.

If possible, I recommend that each receptacle be a GFCI rather than one GFCI protecting several receptacles. That way, one faulty device will not trip the power to other devices.
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Jerome Malsack

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #23 on: February 13, 2015, 12:53:54 pm »

Stage boxes installed in a stage need to be wired as a permanent install, whether the stage is permanent or movable. In the case of a movable stage, you would have a junction box where you transition from "installed" methods (i.e., conduit) to "moveable" methods (i.e., SO with a plug on the end).

On the other hand, stage boxes that are NOT installed permanently, constructed as a stringer, could be wired using SO cord. However, all boxes, clamps, and strain reliefs must be listed for exposed, moveable use and SO-type cord (no "handy boxes" with knockouts that could be accidentally knocked out). The end of the SO must be equipped with a plug; if the source end is hard wired into a junction box then it's no longer considered a moveable installation. It might just be cheaper and easier to buy a premade stringer.

If possible, I recommend that each receptacle be a GFCI rather than one GFCI protecting several receptacles. That way, one faulty device will not trip the power to other devices.


Powercon on mobile connections ?  Do inspectors know what these are, and prefer them over the edison plug ?
 
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Rob Spence

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2015, 01:40:03 pm »



Powercon on mobile connections ?  Do inspectors know what these are, and prefer them over the edison plug ?
 

I suspect most inspectors know nothing about Powercon.
The good news is that since they are not NEMA 5-15 (or 20), they often don't count as accessible to the public for what that might be worth.

What is an Edison plug? Are you referring to receptacles or male connectors?

I put my grinch hat on this morning as it is cold here :-)
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Jerome Malsack

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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2015, 01:58:53 pm »

yes sorry,  Should have been 5-15 or 20. 
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Re: Wiring A Stage For AC Power
« Reply #25 on: February 13, 2015, 01:58:53 pm »


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